Depth Psych
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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Biophilia: The New Plant-Based Way To Stay Healthy

Biophilia: The New Plant-Based Way To Stay Healthy | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

We now spend an average of 90 percent of our time living and working in sealed-off, air-tight, toxic, manmade environments....

 

Plants make us feel good. In fact, other elements of the natural world do also. Why is that?

In a word, it's "biophilia." A term coined by social psychologist Erich Fromm in the 1960s, biophilia is our biologically-inherited need to commune with nature. Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson, in his book Biophilia defines it as "the connections that human beings subconsciously seek with the rest of life." In his biophilia hypothesis, Wilson has urged that these connections are imperative for healthy emotional development and wellbeing.⊃1;

When I first heard about biophilia... it really resonated with me. I had recently learned about Nature Deficit Disorder (NDD)⊃2; an unofficial behavioral disorder that stems from the "disconnect" our children have with the natural world. Biophilia certainly explained the challenge of NDD and why it has a profound impact on our future.

As a species, humans evolved over millions of years amid natural surroundings. Our physical, mental, emotional and spiritual... (Click title for more)

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Holotropic Breathwork: New Perspectives in Psychotherapy and Self-Exploration (Stan Grof)

Holotropic Breathwork: New Perspectives in Psychotherapy and Self-Exploration  (Stan Grof) | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In the last few decades, Western therapists have rediscovered the healing potential of breath and developed techniques that utilize it. Deliberate increase of the pace of breathing  typically loosens psychological defenses and leads to a release and
emergence of unconscious (and superconscious) material.

 

The extraordinary healing power of holotropic states — which  ancient and native cultures used for centuries or even millennia in their ritual, spiritual, and healing practices — was confirmed by modern consciousness research conducted in the second half of the twentieth century. This research has also shown that the phenomena occurring during these states and associated with them represent a critical challenge for current conceptual frameworks used by academic psychiatry and psychology and for their basic metaphysical assumptions. The work with Holotropic Breathwork thus requires a new understanding of consciousness and of the human psyche in health and disease. The basic principles of this new psychology were discussed in another context (Grof 2000, 2007). (Click title for more)

 
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Laura M. Smith's curator insight, October 15, 2014 9:46 PM

Wonderfully illustrated piece on holotropic breathwork as a psycho-spiritual healing practice...piques my curiosity to bring this into my work with dreams, specifically focusing on trauma as opened by the dream and where it's held in the body.

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THE WOUNDED HEALER

THE WOUNDED HEALER | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

One of the deeper, underlying archetypal patterns which is being constellated in the human psyche that is playing itself out collectively on the world stage is the archetype of the “wounded healer.” To quote Kerenyi, a colleague of Jung who elucidated this archetype, the wounded healer refers psychologically to the capacity “to be at home in the darkness of suffering and there to find germs of light and recovery with which, as though by enchantment, to bring forth Asclepius, the sunlike healer.”


The archetype of the wounded healer reveals to us that it is only by being willing to face, consciously experience and go through our wound do we receive its blessing. To go through our wound is to embrace, assent, and say “yes” to the mysteriously painful new place in ourselves where the wound is leading us. Going through our wound, we can allow ourselves to be re-created by the wound.


Our wound is not a static entity, but rather a continually unfolding dynamic process that manifests, reveals and incarnates itself through us, which is to say that our wound is teaching us something about ourselves. Going through our wound means realizing we will never again be the same when we get to the other side of ... Click title for more

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Eva Rider's curator insight, July 10, 2014 1:11 AM

Looking to the placement  of Chiron in the astrological chart, offers both clues and keys to healing inner Chiron , the wounded healer in us all.

 

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“The Red Book” by Carl Jung: A Primer For Healing Madness In A Mad World

“The Red Book” by Carl Jung: A Primer For Healing Madness In A Mad World | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Through his meticulous design of The Red Book, Carl G. Jung interwove his experience of madness with the collective suffering of his era. Such syntheses are rare — and just what the current mental health field desperately needs. In what follows, I look at how The Red Book became Jung’s journey out of madness as well as the foundation for his analytical psychology. Even today, over 50 years after his death, Jung’s analytical psychology is a relevant, non-pathologizing method for transcending madness, while also relating individual suffering to the larger collective.

The Ways of Jung’s World

In the early twentieth century, when Jung was “flooded” with “an enigmatic stream” that threatened to break him, the field of psychology was just beginning to make a science of the study of madness. Practitioners still acknowledged the wisdom of artists, novelists, and poets with regards to the nature of the human psyche. The soul was still in need of cure, and hearts were broken as much as brains. There were perhaps five diagnoses in use...(Click title for more)

 

 

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Expanded Consciousness: The Instinctive Bond Between Humans and Nature: Developmental Psychology

Expanded Consciousness: The Instinctive Bond Between Humans and Nature: Developmental Psychology | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The biophilia hypothesis asserts the existence of a fundamental, genetically based, human need and propensity to affiliate with life and life like processes. Consider, for example, that recent studies have shown that even minimal connection with nature—such as looking at it through a window—increases productivity and health in the workplace, promotes healing of patients in hospitals, and reduces the frequency of sickness in prisons.

 

Other studies have begun to show that when given the option, humans choose landscapes such as prominences near water from which parkland can be viewed that fit patterns laid down deep in human history on the savannas of East Africa. Wilson (1992) points out that people crowd national parks to experience natural landscapes, and ‘‘travel long distances to stroll along the seashore, for reasons they can’t put into words’’.

According to Wilson (1984), the biophilic instinct emerges, often unconsciously, in our cognition, emotions, art, and ethics, and unfolds ‘‘in the predictable fantasies and responses of individuals from early childhood onward. It cascades into repetitive patterns of culture across most or all societies’... (click title to read more)

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On wounding... from Rumi

On wounding... from Rumi | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"The wound is the place where the light enters you"~ Rumi

http://depthpsychologylist.com/Rumi-wound-is-where-light-enters

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Finding deeper meanings in the language of mental health

Finding deeper meanings in the language of mental health | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

A word is like a promise; a failure to deliver a kind of betrayal.  What does the language of mental health promise?


PSYCHOLOGY “study of the soul” (ψυχή, psukhē, meaning “breath”, “spirit”, or “soul”); and (-λογία -logia, translated as “study of” or “research”)

 

An essential part of the “scientific” training for young psychology/psychiatry/counseling grad students is a total denial of the spiritual (implicitly or explicitly, the message is that a true scientist must, by definition, be an atheist, and that faith is a foolish and primitive superstition).  You’d be hard pressed to find a mainstream mental health professional willing to call himself a “soul healer” or a “student of the soul” in English, though in Greek the claim is proudly printed on their business cards. .. (Click title for more)

 

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Wounded Healer

Wounded Healer | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Wounded Healer: An archetypal dynamic that may be constellated in an analytic relationship.


This term derives from the legend of Asclepius, a Greek doctor who in recognition of his own wounds established a sanctuary at Epidaurus where others could be healed of their ‘wounds’.


Those seeking to be cured went through a process called incubation. First they had a cleansing bath, thought to have a purifying effect on the soul as well as the body. Uncontaminated by the body, the soul was free to commune with the gods. After preliminary sacrificial offerings, the incubants lay on a couch and went to sleep. If they were lucky, they had a healing dream; if they were luckier, a snake came in the night and bit them.


The wounded healer archetype can be schematized by a variation of the diagram used by Jung to illustrate the lines of communication in a relationship...(click title for more)

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Exploring Depth Psychotherapy

Exploring Depth Psychotherapy | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Here’s a start to a few blog entries exploring important aspects of psychotherapy as practiced by depth psychologists of various stripes.


Let’s assume a basic working definition of depth psychotherapy. Let’s assume that it’s a form of therapy that goes out of its way to include the unconscious psyche in treatment. By unconscious psyche we mean at minimum certain dynamic patterns that are always at play beneath the surface of our awareness. Let’s assume that engaging the psyche stimulates growth and movement and often helps to ease problematic symptoms of emotional suffering.


So how does a therapist go about engaging the psyche? Truth is, there are lots of ways...(Click title to read full post)

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Reconnecting with Wholeness with Depth Psychology -- DepthList Blog

Reconnecting with Wholeness with Depth Psychology -- DepthList Blog | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
The depth psychological view focuses on mystery and the creativity and potentiality that resides in the unknown. The mysteries of the unconscious manifest when they are ready. According to James Hillman, contemporary archetypal psychologist, each of us is pulled toward a telos, a whole and complete finished product, each unique, like an acorn that turns into a massive oak tree. This is also the call of the Self to which Jung refers.

Jungian thought identifies “health” as wholeness, and “pathology” or lack of health as lack of wholeness. Jung (Memories, Dreams, Reflections, 1964) asserted that current western cultures have lost a sense of the sacred, and in so doing have become dislocated and disoriented, losing meaning and vitality by losing contact with what he calls the regulating center of the soul. This condition of being out of balance is often...(Click title to continue)
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