Depth Psych
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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Depth Insights - What is Depth Psychology?

Depth Insights - What is Depth Psychology? | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Depth psychology, a term first coined by Swiss psychiatrist, Eugene Bleuler, around the end of the 1800’s, has its beginnings in the work of Sigmund Freud and another Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Gustav Jung, along with Pierre Janet and William James. Depth Psychology, which encompasses the field of Jungian Psychology, explores the hidden or deeper parts of human experience by seeing things in depth rather than taking them apart.

The self we think we know is only a tiny portion of the self that really exists. The ego self, the self we are aware of and can observe, is just the tip of an iceberg in a vast ocean of unconsciousness. Since what is unconscious is not known, our known version of our self is limited and confined. We are vastly influenced by the immense hidden aspects of the greater self that surrounds us, which is mostly out of sight or understanding.

Depth Psychology seeks to uncover or reveal repressed or hidden aspects of our self, rather like opening a window from inside the limited (click title to continue reading)...
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Jane Brody's curator insight, January 1, 2013 3:58 PM

I have been working using these concepts as an acting teacher, with no name for my practice.  I am grateful to have come upon this concept which is completely related to the work of Sanford Meisner and other great acting theoreticians.

Eva Rider's curator insight, October 5, 2014 3:25 PM

more on defining the depth of Depth Psychology by Bonnie Bright , Founder of Depth Psychology Alliance.

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Jung and the Archetype of the Apocalypse

Jung and the Archetype of the Apocalypse | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
As we have noted in earlier essays,[1] Jung was very intuitive. Thanks to his keen intuition he was able to sense shifts in the collective consciousness long before outer changes made these shifts obvious to others. One of the shifts he noted was the approach of the end time and the activation of what he called the archetype of the apocalypse.[2] As early as the 1950’s Jung foresaw the approach of the “end time.”[3]
Jung felt it was important for people to know about this archetype because he recognized the power each individual has to change the future.[4] He knew that if enough people become aware of the apocalypse, as an archetype, understand its intentions and internalize its meaning in their own lives, the fate of the world might be more positive.[5] In this essay we are going to discuss briefly the meaning and features of archetypes, with particular attention to the archetype of the apocalypse, and then consider how... (Click on the title to continue reading)
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THE DEPTH OF THE SOUL: JAMES HILLMAN’S VISION OF PSYCHOLOGY

THE DEPTH OF THE SOUL: JAMES HILLMAN’S VISION OF PSYCHOLOGY | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
For the past quarter century James Hillman has been creating a new vision of psychology, one in which psychology becomes a "supreme discipline" concerned not only with the psyche of humanity but the "soul" which is at the heart of the world. Vilified by some, he has been called brilliant, explosive and poetic by others. His ideas, through their popularization in the writings of the best selling author, Thomas Moore (1992, 1994), have reached millions, yet he is unheard of by many professional psychologists.

While some psychologists have applauded Hillman's call for a return of the soul to a central place in psychology (Elkins, 1995), others have been put off by the fact that Hillman's own writings are critical of the humanist tradition, highly provocative and occasionally... (Click title to read more)
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Jane Brody's curator insight, January 1, 2013 4:03 PM

Absolutely unbelievably good response to Hillman.  By the way, I saw him tap dance at a conference, he was so full of joy and love, that he gave the dance to us all as a sort of kiss.

 

ProPastoralCounsel's curator insight, February 19, 2014 9:46 AM

The search for the soul is alive and well.

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About Joseph Campbell

About Joseph Campbell | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Over one hundred years ago, on March 26th in 1904, Joseph John Campbell was born in White Plains, NY. Joe, as he came to be known, was the first child of a middle-class, Roman Catholic couple, Charles and Josephine Campbell.


Joe's earliest years were largely unremarkable; but then, when he was seven years old, his father took him and his younger brother, Charlie, to see Buffalo Bill's Wild West show. The evening was a high-point in Joe's life; for, although the cowboys were clearly the show's stars, as Joe would later write, he "became fascinated, seized, obsessed, by the figure of a naked American Indian with his ear to the ground, a bow and arrow in his hand, and a look of special knowledge in his eyes.”

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