Depth Psych
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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Greater than the Sum of Its Parts: Depth Psychology and the Honeybee Hive - PGIAA

Greater than the Sum of Its Parts: Depth Psychology and the Honeybee Hive - PGIAA | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
One glorious late spring day on Pacifica’s Ladera Campus I witnessed a humming, writhing, vibrant swarm of honeybees on a bougainvillea bush. It stopped me in my tracks, entrancing me with the sheer number and proximity of bees buzzing around what seemed to be a living, breathing organ that almost pulsed with power—what turned outRead More
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Planet Beehive—An eco-depth-psychological look at bees, philosophy, and culture

Planet Beehive—An eco-depth-psychological look at bees, philosophy, and culture | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
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The Archetypal Field of Leadership by Silvia Behrend

The Archetypal Field of Leadership by Silvia Behrend | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The Pacific Northwest is frequently cold and gray both in the spring and summer. However, the weather does not essentially change the natural patterns of bird migration. Thus, I was surprised to hear the honking of a lone goose flying through the early spring air as the migration had not yet begun. Why was it flying alone?

 

I followed the goose as long as possible and imagined different things: the goose was lost, it was re-joining its mate or its flock, it was flying reconnaissance. Whatever the reality of that one goose, I was moved in a powerful and non-rational way. I experienced a flash of intuitive knowing that the archetypal field of leadership is one of service to the mandates of the Self, predicated upon a conscious ego-Self relationship. In this paper, Self specifically refers to the ordering principle of the Psyche, which is understood to be the totality of all psychic processes. The Self is that which brings the ego into conscious relationship with the psyche, and may be called... (click title for more)

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Jung and Synchronicity: The Union of Nature and Psyche

Jung and Synchronicity: The Union of Nature and Psyche | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

C.G. Jung determined that the psychological and physical features we perceive in the world are dual aspects of one underlying reality (Pauli et al., 2001). He came to view mind and matter as a continuum, with psyche located on one end and the physiological instinct on the other, and the archetype serving as the bridge between them (C. G. Jung, 1947/1985, p. 216), though he ultimately expressed a desire to do away with a theory of psychophysical parallelism altogether in lieu of a unitary reality known as the unus mundus, a union of spirit, soul and body (C. G. Jung, 1958/1978a, p. 452).

Pointing to ways in which inanimate objects seem to “collaborate” with the unconscious by forming symbolic patterns, Jung even cited instances where clocks stop at the moment of their owner’s passing, or where items break within a home where someone is going through a powerful emotional crisis. Click title to read more...

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Susan Scott's curator insight, May 7, 2015 3:16 AM

I loved this - so insightful and broadening. Thank you.

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Reconnecting with the Sacred: Finding "Home"

Reconnecting with the Sacred: Finding "Home" | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Watching what’s going on on our planet each day, I am continually struck by the suffering and grief that seems to be inherent in the human condition. It occurs to me that part of the problem is that western culture places so much value on individualism, independence, and getting ahead, venerating community and interdependence less.


As a result, many of us generally live lives of separation, disconnected in various ways from a larger kinship of our fellow human beings, unable to perceive how intrinsic each of us and every single aspect of earth and nature is to each other. It often seems to take a tragedy to bring us together in community, force us to meet our neighbors, or realize a felt sense of being part of something larger than our individual selves living our everyday lives.


Due to our overwhelming self-centeredness (a term I use not to mean arrogance so much as the unconscious evolutionary tendency to create our lives to revolve around what’s important to “me”: my life, my schedule.... (click title for more)

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Renee Baribeau's curator insight, June 14, 2013 12:01 PM

How to we bridge our separation? An important question to ask during these times of rapid dissemenation of information.