Depth Psych
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Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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Depth Insights » "Wotan in the Shadows: Analytical Psychology and the Archetypal Roots of War" by Ritske Rensma

Depth Insights » "Wotan in the Shadows: Analytical Psychology and the Archetypal Roots of War" by Ritske Rensma | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung lived in a time of crisis. He was confronted with the atrocities of two world wars, spent his final years in the climate of the cold war, and was hugely concerned about mankind’s inability to find solutions to the recurring occurrences of mass conflict he was forced to witness in his lifetime. It should come as no surprise, then, that Jung wrote extensively about the possible causes of war and conflict. A central notion which he defended throughout his career was that the roots of war are to be found in the human psyche, in what he called our “war-like instincts,” which we will never be able to eradicate:


"Anything that disappears from your psychological inventory is apt to turn up in the guise of a hostile neighbor, who will inevitably arouse your anger and make you aggressive. It is surely better to know that your worst enemy is right there in your own heart. Man‘s war-like instincts are ineradicable – therefore a state of perfect peace is unthinkable..."


- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/wotan-in-the-shadows-analytical-psychology-and-the-archetypal-roots-of-war-by-dr-ritske-rensma/#sthash.kSBbesZw.dpuf

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Carl Jung: Religion and the search for meaning

Carl Jung: Religion and the search for meaning | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Mark Vernon: Jung thought psychology could offer a language for grappling with moral ambiguities in an age of spiritual crisis

 

In 1959, two years before his death, Jung was interviewed for the BBC television programme Face to Face. The presenter, John Freeman, asked the elderly sage if he now believed in God. "Now?" Jung replied, paused and smiled. "Difficult to answer. I know. I don't need to believe, I know."

What did he mean? Perhaps several things.

 

He had spent much of the second half of his life exploring what it is to live during a period of spiritual crisis. It is manifest in the widespread search for meaning – a peculiar characteristic of the modern age: our medieval and ancient forebears showed few signs of it, if anything suffering from an excess of meaning. The crisis stems from the cultural convulsion triggered by the decline of religion in Europe. "Are we not plunging continually," Nietzsche has the "madman" ask when he announces ... (click title to continue)

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