Depth Psych
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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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Symbols and the Transformation of the Psyche

Symbols and the Transformation of the Psyche | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The delusional idea of a cancerous growth in a healthy body, then, is a symbol, which can provide a point of entry into the unconscious realm of complexes, processes, and hidden conflicts. And just as a physical cancer will suck the life out of a living organism if it is allowed to grow and remains unchecked, a psychic cancer too will drain a person's life of psychic energy and produce a state of hopeless stagnation and eventually even psychic death. Symbols have the power to do just that. They collect, hold, and channel psychic energy, for good or ill.//

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Taking Direction From the Spirit In Shamanism and Psychotherapy

Taking Direction From the Spirit In Shamanism and Psychotherapy | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Generally speaking shamans have good reason to be leery of psychology, which historically has dismissed shamans as schizophrenics, epileptics, and hysterics. Jung, who at least does not pathologize shamanism, nevertheless seems to denigrate it when he says that shamanism works out of a “primitive mentality” which sees the psyche as “outside the body,” whereas we denizens of the 20th Century West have no choice but to view the psyche as “inside.”

 

What separates shamanism and psychotherapy, in short, is a clash of metaphysics. Mainstream psychotherapy -- including much that is Jungian -- locates the real “inside” and constructs a topography of drives, instincts, archetypes, complexes, and the like to explain our experience as the result of “interior dynamics.” Meanwhile shamanism locates the real “outside” and maps a greater cosmos...

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Who Are We Really?: C.G. Jung's "Split Personality"

Who Are We Really?: C.G. Jung's "Split Personality" | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Desiring neither to be like his long-suffering, dispirited, hen-pecked father (a Swiss parson) nor his sometimes psychotic, emotionally unstable (possibly borderline) mother, Jung, already innately introverted, was forced farther inward to seek and create his own personality. Or, as Jung himself puts it, his two personalities.

 

The first personality was the ordinary, mundane, dependent, as yet undeveloped and immature boy, with his banal, bourgeois, conventional, rational outer reality and intense inferiority feelings. But the second personality was precisely the polar opposite: mature, powerful, wise, superior, autonomous, instinctual, spiritual, mystical, and deeply rooted and embedded in nature and the irrational. In hindsight, the grown Jung seems to have recognized that the second personality was clearly compensatory to the first, what we today refer to as a "grandiose self" designed to offset painful feelings of...

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Carl Jung's Trickster Archetype and Trickster Deities

Carl Jung's Trickster Archetype and Trickster Deities | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
A look at Jung's Trickster archetype, the trickster gods upon which he based them, and how we still have the remnants of the trickster gods today.

 

One of the psychological archetypes established by Carl Jung is the Trickster. Jung's archetypes are often confused with being symbolic figures, but that is not quite an accurate description. Archetypes are rather closer to being a social tendency that has its foundation in the biological construct of humanity; this tendency then goes on to influence the formation of symbolic representations. The archetypes function at the psychological level of the unconscious but not...

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Carl Jung and the Shadow: An Introduction

Carl Jung and the Shadow: An Introduction | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The Jungian Shadow: Its Phenomenology, Detection and Conscious Integration

Psychiatrist Carl Jung’s construct of the shadow,
comprised of the denied aspects of the self (1959, p. 20), conceals within itself the golden key not only to understanding the agency by which wars and feuds of all kinds tend to start, but the very solution to preventing their emergence in the first place. Such conflicts develop out of constricted, narrow views, and Jung claimed the shadow itself was the result of a narrow identification with the persona—the social mask, at the expense of the unattended aspects of...

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What is Synchronicity?

What is Synchronicity? | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

What is Synchronicity?

The term synchronicity is coined by Jung to express a concept that belongs to him. It is about acausal connection of two or more psycho-physic phenomena. This concept was inspired to him by a patient's case that was in situation of impasse in treatment. Her exaggerate rationalism (animus inflation) was holding her back from assimilating unconscious materials. One night, the patient dreamt a golden scarab - cetonia aurata. The next day, during the psychotherapy session, a real insect this time, hit against the Jung's cabinet window. Jung caught it and discovered surprisingly that it was a golden scarab; a very rare presence for that climate....

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The Father of Analytical Psychology: Carl Jung's near-death experience

The Father of Analytical Psychology: Carl Jung's near-death experience | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In a hospital in Switzerland in 1944, the world-renowned psychiatrist Carl G. Jung, had a heart attack and then a near-death experience. His vivid encounter with the light, plus the intensely meaningful insights led Jung to conclude that his experience came from something real and eternal. Jung's experience is unique in that he saw the Earth from a vantage point of about a thousand miles above it.

 

His incredibly accurate view of the Earth from outer space was described about two decades before astronauts in space first described it. Subsequently, as he reflected on life after death, Jung recalled the meditating Hindu from his near-death experience and read it as a parable of the archetypal Higher Self, the God-image within. Carl Jung, who founded analytical psychology, centered on the archetypes of the collective unconscious. The following is an excerpt from his autobiography entitled Memories, Dreams, Reflections describing his near-death experience...

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The clown archetype: Reflections on the age-old wisdom within the fool’s humor

The clown archetype: Reflections on the age-old wisdom within the fool’s humor | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

A wise and teaching clown image appeared to me once during an Active Imagination and Authentic Movement session. During the session I was working on the contrasting images of an old hobo and the new man, Adam. The old hobo came through as derelict and aimless, while Adam was unsullied and new, but also aimless. I discovered that although they seemed to be worlds apart, they actually were very similar, and even the same in one very important aspect: they both lived with little future orientation, in the moment of now. As symbolic images, a slight but huge difference between them is that the hobo is an aimless wanderer living from day to day, while Adam is an aimless wonderer in the beautiful paradise of the present. Their similarity however is the awareness of, and focus on, the now.


After these opposite but similar figures appeared during the Authentic Movement session, two other images came that also seemed worlds apart, yet were closely linked in similarity: the “Eternal Sower”, the provider, the giver of life and sustenance, and the “Eternal Beggar”, the taker, the one who only wants for himself...

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The Making of The Red Book

The most influential unpublished work in the history of psychology.

 

When Carl Jung embarked on an extended self-exploration he called his “confrontation with the unconscious,” the heart of it was The Red Book, a large, illuminated volume he created between 1914 and 1930. Here he developed his principle theories—of the archetypes, the collective unconscious, and the process of individuation—that transformed psychotherapy from a practice concerned with treatment of the sick into a means for higher development of the personality....

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Redefining Reality: Psychology, Science and Solipsism- Dr. Stephen Diamond

Redefining Reality: Psychology, Science and Solipsism- Dr. Stephen Diamond | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The Zen teacher Chuang Tzu dreamed he was a butterfly. When he woke, he wondered, "Am I a man who dreamt about being a butterfly, or am I really a butterfly who now dreams about being a man?"

The fundamental question regarding the nature of reality is partly philosophical, partly spiritual, part psychological, and partly scientific in nature. But it is not merely academic. For how we perceive, understand, experience, interpret and respond to reality has concrete and practical repercussions in both our intrapersonal and interpersonal relationships, for the practice of psychotherapy, as well as regarding how we relate to the planet and cosmos. Last year, I posted a few thoughts on the topic of subjective or relative reality. As we enter 2010, it seems an opportune time to review what was said, and continue the conversation here on what is real and what is not. I invite readers to share their personal insights and realities in response....

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A Review of Several Books on the Works of Carl Gustav Jung

A Review of Several Books on the Works of Carl Gustav Jung | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Major Work by Jung offers Intriguing Insight into Jung Himself and the Social Origins of Analytic Psychology.
This column reviews several books about the work and thought of C.G. Jung: "Atom and Archetype: The Pauli/Jung Letters, 1932-1958" edited by C. A. Meier, "Jung: A Feminist Revision" by Susan Rowland, "Carl Gustav Jung" by Ann Casement, and "Translate the Darkness: The Life of Christiana Morgan, the Veiled Woman in Jung's Circle" by Claire Douglas. Also included are "VISIONS: Notes of the Seminar Given in 1930-1934 by C. G. Jung", edited by Claire Douglas, the "Cambridge Companion to Jung" edited by Polly Young-Eisendrath, "C.G. Jung: His Myth in Our Time" by Marie e-Lousie Von Franz, and "Memories, dreams, Reflections" by C. G. Jung.

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"Crete Spring"-An Appreciation for James Hillman (1926-2011)

"Crete Spring"-An Appreciation for James Hillman (1926-2011) | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Trauma rearranges us. We know that. But so, sometimes, does reading. In this piece, Louise Steinman reflects on both, and pays tribute to a writer who had a deep impact on many of us, directly and indirectly. — Tom Lutz

 

During the seventies and eighties my longtime friend, a painter, lived in Greece, on the island of Crete. In 1981, when spring beckoned after a long, dark New York City winter, I scraped together the money to visit her there for the first time.

My friend lived with her Greek husband, a musician from Athens, in an old stone house painted robin’s egg blue in a village outside the port city of Chania, 25 miles from the western edge of the island. Though none of us had much money, we ate royally on produce from the garden augmented occasionally by fresh catch from local fishermen and always with excellent cheap local wine decanted into a liter bottle from a barrel at the grocer’s.

 

My friend’s house had no indoor plumbing, no hot water, no electricity. Mail was rare, phone service was conducted from a pay phone over open boxes of salted sardines at the corner ...

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Jung as Father and Husband

Jung as Father and Husband | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Carl Jung married Emma Rauschenbach on Valentine’s Day, 1903.[4] In the first 11 years of their marriage they had 5 children: Twenty-two months after their wedding they had their first child, Agatha, followed by Anna Margaretha (Gret) 14 months later. Their only son, Franz, was born in November, 1908, and they had two younger daughters, Marianne (born in September 1910) and Emma Helene (born in March 1914).[5]

 

In one of the many letters he wrote to Freud, Jung noted how they tried to prevent pregnancies but obviously without much success.[6] After 1914, the Jungs had separate bedrooms, which was the usual arrangement for persons of their social class with completed families.[7]

 

What sort of parent was Jung? In a word, “severe.”[8]...

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Roberta McDonnell's comment, February 15, 2012 2:12 PM
I just finished reading Deirdre Bair's biography of Jung and while it's thin onthe depths of his work in my opinion, it does give a sense of the complexity of Jung as a man, a husband, father and colleague. The impression is one of sterness and impatience at times but also of depth of attachment and tenderness, especially in later years.The later chapters are actually quite moving and Bair's strength is that she allows us to understand Jung the man in the social and interpersonal world he inhabited. Swiss culture at that time was highly prescriptive of restrained social and personal behaviour, especially for women. Jung seems to have had a wicked sense of humour though and a strong attachment to hios wife and children as well as several female colleagues. I thoroughly enjoyed the book.
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Oedipus Redivivus Freud, Jung, and Psychoanalysis

Oedipus Redivivus Freud, Jung, and Psychoanalysis | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Freudian psychoanalysis, a related body of clinical technique, interpretive strategy, and developmental theory, was articulated piecemeal in dozens of publications by Sigmund Freud, spread over a period of forty-five years. The structure of Freud's monumental twenty-three volume corpus of work has been the subject of thousands of critical studies, and Freud is still one of the most popular subjects for biographers. Despite this wealth of writing, however, the effectiveness of Freud's therapeutic methods and the adequacy of his theories remain subjects of animated debate.

 

This chapter is concerned with the status of Freud's theorizing during his collaboration with Carl Jung, and with the mutual influence of each thinker on the other in the years following their estrangement. Jung's seven year discipleship with Freud was a turning point in his emergence as a distinctive thinker of world importance (Jung, 1961). At the beginning of his fascination with Freud in 1906, Jung was a...

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A Jungian Approach to Psychosis: The Inner Apocalypse in Mythology, Madness & The Future

A Jungian Approach to Psychosis: The Inner Apocalypse in Mythology, Madness & The Future | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

All we have learned of psychotherapy suggests that it is at the precise time when the individual feels as if his whole life is crashing down around him, that he is most likely to achieve an inner reorganisation constituting a quantum leap in his growth toward maturity.

 

Our hope, our belief, is that it is precisely when society's future seems so beleaguered – when its problems seem almost staggering in complexity, when so many individuals seem alienated, and so many values seem to have deteriorated – that it is most likely to achieve a metamorphosis in...

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Loving the Mystery: Jung on Our "De-Psychized" Modern Reality

Loving the Mystery: Jung on Our "De-Psychized" Modern Reality | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Why is our current attitude to mystery so dangerous? And what would Jung want to see supplant it? This essay will consider these questions: why the current orientation of Western culture is dangerous, and what Jung called for to remedy or lessen the danger....

 

Our One-Sidedness---Western culture lacks balance. We put far too much emphasis on logic, linear thinking, and the rationality of the left brain. We are one-sided in our development of our instinct for knowledge, seemingly oblivious of the need to nourish and develop other instincts, like that for spiritual meaning and a sense of purpose in life. We also overvalue external objects, ignoring or denigrating the inner life and intangibles. This is due in part to the materialistic ethos of our culture, with its focus on “getting and spending,” downplaying spirituality...

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Why Go Into Analysis?

Why Go Into Analysis? | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

“The analytical procedure, especially when it includes a systematic dream-analysis, is a ‘process of quickened maturation,’ as Stanley Hall once aptly remarked.”[1]~Jung, 1945

“…psychoanalysis… gives the patient a working philosophy of life based on empirical insights, which, besides affording him a knowledge of his own nature, also make it possible for him to fit into this scheme of things.”[2]~Jung, 1912


Jung’s Thoughts
The quotes above from Jung give some of the benefits he saw in analysis. Jung clearly appreciated Stanley Hall’s idea that analysis quickens the...

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Carl Jung Quotes from "Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious"

Carl Jung Quotes from "Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious" | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The concept of archetypes as the mode of expression of the collective unconscious is discussed. In addition to the purely personal unconscious hypothesized by Freud, a deeper unconscious level is felt to exist. This deeper level manifests itself in universal archaic images expressed in dreams, religious beliefs, myths, and fairytales. The archetypes, as unfiltered psychic experience, appear sometimes in their most primitive and naive forms (in dreams), sometimes in a considerably more complex form due to the operation of conscious...

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Carl Jung's "Stages Of Life"

Carl Jung's "Stages Of Life" | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"Something in us wishes to remain a child, to be unconscious or, at most, conscious only of the ego; to reject everything strange, or else subject it to our will; to do nothing, or else indulge our own craving for pleasure or power."
-- Carl Jung, The Structures & Dynamics of the Psyche

 

According to Carl Jung, what prevents people from becoming autonomous, fulfilled and....

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Freud & Jung: Written Revelations

Freud & Jung: Written Revelations | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The contrasts between the handwriting of Sigmund Freud and that of Carl Jung show that they had very different temperaments and give credence to speculation that the difference in their personalities was an important factor in the final dissolution of their friendship. Notice Freud’s compact, heavily pressured writing with numerous restrictions. These qualities show temperamental volatility, emotional torment, and impulsive outbursts. Contrast that with the much more controlled writing of Jung, seen in the small size and more proportionate lengths of the upper and lower extending strokes.....

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Mary Watkins, Helene Lorenze, & the Post-Jungian Liberationist Imagination

Mary Watkins, Helene Lorenze, & the Post-Jungian Liberationist Imagination | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Just as the rise of the rational ego ruling the psyche paralleled the rise of the hierarchical nation-state, so did the development of depth psychology coincide with the rise of the post-colonial liberation movements.


Forms of inner oppression, including defense, forgetting, projection, repression, denial, splitting, sadistic superego, shadow, narcissism, echo forms of outer oppression that characterize colonial hegemony. A liberationist depth psychology names these as colonial operations in need of deconstruction and "seeing through" (Hillman).

 

For how many years did history books portray the genocide caused by colonial expansion as a triumph of civilization, the tragedy of slavery and the plantation system as unrelated to the wealth amassed for industrialization, the exclusion of women, Native Americans and African Americans from the political process as the rise of democracy? Educated in this paradigm, how much have we learned...

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Mythology in Psychotherapy: An Interview with Jonathan Young, PhD

Mythology in Psychotherapy: An Interview with Jonathan Young, PhD | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

How does myth apply to psychotherapy and to psychological growth and development?

Myths provide guidance for difficult times. They can give encouragement as we struggle to survive horrendous ordeals. I have found that in clinical work, and in my own journey, it is useful to study mythic stories for hope. After all, those classic heroic seekers did get through their awesome challenges. The tales also provide hints on dealing with mid-life crises or other difficult transitions.

 

The heroic journey is a description of an initiatory adventure. In many ways, psychotherapy is an initiatory process. People seek help when their coping mechanisms fail. This is the boundary of a new country, a place they have not traveled before. The ancient sagas provide roadmaps for people dealing with anxiety-producing experiences and the mysteries of the unconscious. The tales help with the difficult life situations that most of us don’t have the conscious resources to handle. It is useful that those who came this way before left a record of what they learned in the form of wisdom tales.... More

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"Christ, a Symbol of the Self " by Jerry Wright, Jung Society of Atlanta

"Christ, a Symbol of the Self " by Jerry Wright, Jung Society of Atlanta | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Carl Jung’s ideas and writings about God, religion, Christ, Christianity, and the Christian Church are some of his most challenging, controversial, and fruitful. His approach was to take ancient “thought forms that have become historically fixed, try to melt them down again and pour them into moulds of immediate experience.” (CW:11:par.148) Jung’s own experience of the numinosum (holy) was a lifelong passion and most of his major written works in the last third of his life were devoted to some aspect of religious experience and religious symbols, with particular attention to the symbols of the Christian myth.

 

In Aion (Collected Works, Vol. 9,ll) Jung addresses Christianity’s central figure, Christ, and unpacks the meaning of Christ as a symbol of the Self. At the request of many of his readers who asked for a more comprehensive treatment of the Christ/Self relationship, and apparently inspired by a dream during a temporary illness, Jung worked on the project for several years...

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A glossary of Jungian terms

A glossary of Jungian terms | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

A glossary of Jungian terms, coagulated by Craig Chalquist, MS PhD,....I collected these terms and concepts on my journey through Jung's letters, seminars, and Collected Works as well as from my studies in Depth Psychology. Terms defined elsewhere in this document appear in italics. You might also want to peruse my Glossary of Freudian Terms and some quotations by James Hillman and Alfred Adler. And of course we all need to get Horney now and then....

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“On the Importance of Numinous Experience in the Alchemy of Individuation”~Murray Stein

“On the Importance of Numinous Experience in the Alchemy of Individuation”~Murray Stein | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In a letter to P.W. Martin (20 August 1945), the founder of the International Study Center of Applied Psychology in Oxted, England, C.G. Jung confirmed the centrality of numinous experience in his life and work: “It always seemed to me as if the real milestones were certain symbolic events characterized by a strong emotional tone. You are quite right, the main interest of my work is not concerned with the treatment of neuroses but rather with the approach to the numinous. But the fact is that the approach to the numinous is the real therapy and inasmuch as you attain to the numinous experiences you are released from the curse of pathology. Even the very disease takes on a numinous character” (Jung 1973, 1: 377).

 

If one holds the classical Jungian view that the only genuine cure for neurosis is to grow out of it through pursuing individuation, then treatment based on this model would seem necessarily to include “the approach to the numinous,” as Jung states so firmly in this letter. The individuation process, as proposed by Jung and his followers, typically includes experiences of a numinous nature. The question is: How are such momentous experiences related to...

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