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» It’s Halloween: Recognizing Our Shadow Side - Psych Central

» It’s Halloween: Recognizing Our Shadow Side - Psych Central | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Watching a friend struggle to create an owl costume for her pre-schooler to wear this Halloween, I asked her why she didn’t persuade him to think of something simpler. “He says he wants to be an owl because it’s the scariest thing he can think of,” my friend replied.

 

Ahh. Precisely. Her little guy is wiser than I am. He knows instinctively what I had forgotten: From ancient times, the point of Halloween has always been to confront our fears of the dark, of death, of evil spirits and all the things that “go bump in the night.”

 

Death always has been and probably always will be a mystery and mysteries make people nervous. Our fears and anxieties about what happens next has driven the imagination of ... (click title for more)

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Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 4, 2013 4:46 PM

TOUT EST GRATUIT mon ami sinon je je n'y serais pas lol !
http://www.globallshare.com/fr/1200655.html

Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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Depth Insights » Jung in the Garden of Eden: A Myth of the Transformation of Consciousness by Arthur George, J.D

Depth Insights » Jung in the Garden of Eden: A Myth of the Transformation of Consciousness by Arthur George, J.D | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The biblical story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden (Genesis Chapters 2-3) is foundational to our Western culture and has influenced the upbringing and psychology of all of us, whether we realize it or not. Mythologists as well as many biblical scholars recognize the story as being in the genre of myth, which makes it appropriate to analyze it from the perspective of depth psychology, among other approaches.


Indeed, as Joseph Campbell concluded, “This story yields its meaning only to a psychological interpretation” (2001, p. 50). Further, Carl Jung (CW 9.2, para. 230) had already written that “cosmogonic myths are, at bottom, symbols for the coming of consciousness.” But the literature about the Eden story taking such a psychological approach is scant, largely due to traditional and problematic gaps and tensions between academic disciplines....


. - See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/jung-in-the-garden-of-eden-a-myth-of-the-transformation-of-consciousness-arthur-george-j-d/#sthash.nvkjfuuH.dpuf

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Jung on "Instinct"

Jung on "Instinct" | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Instinct. An involuntary drive toward certain activities. All psychic processes whose energies are not under conscious control are instinctive.

 

Jung identified five prominent groups of instinctive factors: creativity, reflection, activity, sexuality and hunger. Hunger is a primary instinct of self-preservation, perhaps the most fundamental of all drives. Sexuality is a close second, particularly prone to psychization, which makes it possible to divert its purely biological energy into other channels. The urge to activity manifests in travel, love of change, restlessness and play. Under reflection, Jung included the religious urge and the search for meaning. Creativity was for Jung in a class by itself. His descriptions of it refer specifically to the impulse to create art.

 

Though we cannot classify it with a high degree of accuracy, the creative instinct is something that deserves special mention. I do not know if “instinct” is the correct word. We use the term “creative instinct” because this factor behaves at least dynamically, like an instinct. Like instinct it is compulsive, but it is not common, and it is not a fixed and invariably....(Click title for more)

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maria taveras's curator insight, January 24, 2:04 PM

Thank you Bonnie  for this gem of a fine. 

Laura Smith's curator insight, January 24, 9:20 PM

Our instincts and how they have been distorted, misused, or repressed are often reflected in the dreams. The dream will always want to move us toward wholeness...all instincts functioning and engaged in our lives.

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The Robert Moss BLOG: Symbol magnets and Jung's fish tales

The Robert Moss BLOG: Symbol magnets and Jung's fish tales | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
When Jung was immersed in his study of the symbolism of the fish in Christianity, alchemy and world mythology, the theme started leaping at him in everyday life. On April 1, 1949, he made some notes about an ancient inscription describing a man whose bottom half was a fish. At lunch that day, he was served fish. In the conversation, there was talk of the custom of making an "April fish" - a European term for "April fool" - of someone.
    In the afternoon, a former patient of Jung's, whom he had not seen for months, arrived at his house and displayed him some "impressive" pictures of fish. That evening, Jung was shown embroidery that featured fishy sea monsters. The next day, another former patient he had not seen in a decade recounted a dream in which a large fish swam towards her.
    Several months later, mulling over this sequence as an example of the phenomenon he dubbed synchronicity, Jung walked by the lake near his house, returning to the same spot several times. The last time he repeated this loop, he found a fish a foot long lying on top of the sea-wall. Jung had seen no one else on the lake shore that morning. While the fish might have been dropped by a bird, its appearance seemed to him quite magical, part of a "run of chance" in which more than "chance" seemed to be at play
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Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs | The Secret Meaning of Myth

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs | The Secret Meaning of Myth | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
A simplified life in nature exemplifies the ideal environment for inner growth; this fact has been alluded to in mystical literature, which expressed the need for humbleness, quietude and the beautiful surrounding of the country. You won’t find sacred literature extolling the need for 25,000 square foot castles, or the newest electronic gadget for that matter. The point was made there is a higher purpose to life, other than materialistic or narcissistic acquisitions, this involves serious inner work on our own ignorance. The advice to “Know Thyself” was the quintessence of Greek philosophy, also applies here.
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Psychology and Alchemy: Reviewed

Psychology and Alchemy: Reviewed | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Dr. Carl G. Jung was an historian! Who knew?! His five-decade long study of the mystery of alchemy seemed a sideshow to me for the longest time. Why resurrect an ancient practice, which had been discarded by intellectuals for centuries? What does making gold have to do with it?

Gradually, over many years of studying the master’s work, it became obvious to me that it would be necessary to enter the labyrinth of his oeuvre on alchemy, to understand what Dr. Jung was really saying in all of those books. Finally, I bought a copy, and like the Philosopher’s Stone to which it refers, it remained on my bookshelf for months, untouched by human hands—incorruptible.

Via Skip_Conover, Eva Rider
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Eva Rider's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:52 PM

Thank you for this insight into Jung's work and study on Alchemy. Jungian psychology without the study of Alchemy is without its core. I have come to this understanding as well. We must go backwards and understand the roots of alchemy to move forward.

The study of the cultural roots of Egyptian and Greek Hermeticism and Gnosticism is key to understanding Jung. The Renaissance alchemists and philosophers did so in order to put the pieces of the puzzle together to find the Philosopher's Stone.  Jung pointed us both backward and forward to our selves and our relationship with Cosmos, Psyche and Matter. So, true.."he more we understand, the less we know".

Skip_Conover's comment, October 23, 2014 4:16 PM
Dear Eva, Many thanks! It's nice to see someone is reading what I write! That's something ... I hope to find more interactions with you. Best regards, Skip Conover PS Please follow http://archetypeinaction.com
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Biophilia: The New Plant-Based Way To Stay Healthy

Biophilia: The New Plant-Based Way To Stay Healthy | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

We now spend an average of 90 percent of our time living and working in sealed-off, air-tight, toxic, manmade environments....

 

Plants make us feel good. In fact, other elements of the natural world do also. Why is that?

In a word, it's "biophilia." A term coined by social psychologist Erich Fromm in the 1960s, biophilia is our biologically-inherited need to commune with nature. Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson, in his book Biophilia defines it as "the connections that human beings subconsciously seek with the rest of life." In his biophilia hypothesis, Wilson has urged that these connections are imperative for healthy emotional development and wellbeing.⊃1;

When I first heard about biophilia... it really resonated with me. I had recently learned about Nature Deficit Disorder (NDD)⊃2; an unofficial behavioral disorder that stems from the "disconnect" our children have with the natural world. Biophilia certainly explained the challenge of NDD and why it has a profound impact on our future.

As a species, humans evolved over millions of years amid natural surroundings. Our physical, mental, emotional and spiritual... (Click title for more)

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Depression During the Holidays

Depression During the Holidays | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

We all have complexes. At the heart of every complex there is a trauma, and also the archetype of that situation, providing the instinctual response and symbols.

 

When something triggers a complex, we are automatically identified with its underlying archetype. They are a trio—trauma, complex, and archetype—and the particular trio leading to the Outsider is perhaps the most dangerous. Humans very often simply despair and give up when they feel permanently left out in the cold... (Click title for more)

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Review - Constructing The Self, Constructing America

Review - Constructing The Self, Constructing America | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Psychotherapist and historian Philip Cushman views person and culture abiding within one another in gradual, constant flux. In this "strange, unorthodox" and remarkable book, he relates the evolution of psychotherapy from Freud to the present in the context of social change from Victorian to post-modern culture. By the same token he portrays psychotherapy as simultaneously determined by, and influential in, the cultural milieu. This will annoy therapists who see themselves as occupying a scientific perch nicely insulated from social pressure, governed by universal, immutable truths about human nature.  It will also challenge historians who sniff at psychological theory without knowing how deeply it has affected their terrain.

 

Cushman writes about the "empty self," the self as commodity created and fulfilled by what he sees as a social milieu emphasizing individualism, consumption, political ignorance, advertising and marketing.

 

Psychotherapy--and its relationship to the United States--is anything but simple; it is one of the most complex, colorful, and strange artifacts of the modern era.  It is a social institution with many theoretical frameworks, ideologies, and guilds. It features some of the most varied and creative ideas of the last 150 years. Its practitioners have developed some of the most unusual... (Click title for more)

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Depth Insights » Stones, Spaceshots, and Shadow Siblings: Symbolic Review of Far Side of the Moon By Colleen Szabo

Depth Insights » Stones, Spaceshots, and Shadow Siblings: Symbolic Review of Far Side of the Moon By Colleen Szabo | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Canadian Robert Lepage’s Far Side of the Moon (Le face cachée de la lune) is a marvelous alchemical stirring of science, history, myth, and philosophy. It’s refreshing in that, rather than portray integration as occurring between a man and woman, Lepage’s polarized human psyche is characterized by two brothers played by Lepage.

 

As opposed to frequent philosophizing from Philippe, we know nothing of André’s internal life. He is indeed the dark side of the moon, Philippe’s shadow. Popular film often portrays the integration drama from the standpoint of the worldly one. Materially successful protagonist discovers the depths of soul and feeling hidden beneath a restless seeking after socioeceonomic power; it’s the Scrooge portrait. Lepage gives us the flip of this cinematic norm; artist and visionary with Scrooge-like shadow-brother longs to experience his creative gifts reflected....

 

- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/stones-spaceshots-and-shadow-siblings-symbolic-review-of-far-side-of-the-moon-by-colleen-szabo/#sthash.3PVIrzGg.dpuf

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C.G. Jung: "Warmth is the Vital Element for the Soul of the Child"

C.G. Jung: "Warmth is the Vital Element for the Soul of the Child" | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child. ~C.G. Jung

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Depth Insights » American Cerberus: Meditations on Pit Bulls and the Underworld by Elizabeth Selena Zinda

Depth Insights » American Cerberus: Meditations on Pit Bulls and the Underworld by Elizabeth Selena Zinda | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Admired by some as strong and loyal, vilified by others as vicious killers, and cherished by many as sweet family members, pit bull type dogs inhabit extreme and contradicting places in the American imagination. For decades public debate has raged over the nature of pit bulls and their rightful place in communities (“pit bull” is not the name of a specific breed but rather refers to few breeds and mixes, notably the American Pit Bull Terrier and American Staffordshire Terrier).

 

Since pit bulls began to be imagined as inherently dangerous in the 1980s they have been the subjects of wave after wave of negative media representation. Municipalities across the country implemented breed-based regulations and bans, resulting in countless dogs being surrendered to shelters or seized and euthanized. In recent years rescue and advocacy efforts emerged in response, with a shift toward positive representation and public education to debunk myths and...


- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/american-cerberus-meditations-on-pit-bulls-and-the-underworld-by-elizabeth-selena-zinda/#sthash.N841ysd1.dpuf

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Depth Insights » "Artemis without Arrows: Aggression Lost and Found" by Betsy Hall

Depth Insights » "Artemis without Arrows: Aggression Lost and Found" by Betsy Hall | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Contemporary American stereotypes, resulting from fixed and rigid typologies, reveal cultural beliefs and psychological truth. Evolving out of a faulty understanding of hunting and farming mythologies, and patriarchal and feminist assertions, one such stereotype is the belief that by nature men, and not women, are hunters.

 

By extension, the binary fantasy that men are aggressive and women are nurturers is a testimonial to the lost archetype of woman as hunter within our everyday life. Denial of feminine aggression has rendered Artemis, a feminine archetype of the Hunt, to an unconscious and split-off position—she has been stripped of her arrows. Drawing upon my own life and with a specific focus on women’s experience, this article examines both the psychological consequences of the lost archetype and the transformation offered by a present day practice that facilitates a conscious re-integration of aggressive instincts.

According to Depth psychology, myths are timeless and eternal stories that contain and reveal essential patterns, and archetypal instincts, that underlie all human experience. The ancient Greek myth of Artemis... (click title for more)

 

Photo credit: Copyright http://www.123rf.com/profile_malchev

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Depth Insights » Frontispiece for Liber Novus: Biblical Texts on Folio Page One of the Red Book by Gerald F. Kegler

Depth Insights » Frontispiece for Liber Novus: Biblical Texts on Folio Page One of the Red Book by Gerald F. Kegler | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

C.G. Jung opens his Liber Novus (The Red Book) with several elements: an elaborately painted initial, “Der Weg des Kommenden” (The Way That is to Come), three calligraphic script passages in Latin from the biblical book of Isaiah, and one from the Gospel According to John.


This material fills the entire first page and closes in Latin with, “Written by C.G. Jung with his own hand in his house in Kusnach/Zurich in the year 1915” (Jung, 2009, folio p. 1). Shamdasani (2012) places Jung’s Red Book in the tradition of William Blake’s illuminated printing.


Jung combined poetic word and artistic imagery in the creation of the Liber Novus. Like the frontispiece of Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, we may appropriately characterize this first folio page as the frontispiece for Liber Primus and the whole Liber Novus.


- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/frontispiece-for-liber-novus-biblical-texts-on-folio-page-one-of-the-red-book-bygerald-f-kegler/#sthash.REmvJ9ZB.dpuf

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Mercury Retrograde and the Imagination

Mercury Retrograde and the Imagination | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The purpose of this post isn’t going to be about what you think it’s going to be about.

You read the word imagination in the title, but actually I’m going to talk about the word in a different way.

And so this little exchange will be a good example of how the mind works when Mercury is retrograde. Or rather what we see about the nature of our habitual mind and the way it works. Which is usually predictable and reactive — thinking but not really understanding.

Mercury retrogrades can be a fortuitous time to foster understanding, because the mental process of the mind is heightened, more engaged and possibly — with a little effort — more present. In fact, compared to its normal rhythm, the mind is liable to feel charged with Mercurial quicksilver.

So what I’m talking about here is this: (Click on the title for more)


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Soul Astrologer's curator insight, January 22, 8:45 AM

Attention Scoop.It followers of Soul Astrology:

The blog and postings will now be based from my website. Since some of the transit information is timely, and Scoop.It sometime delivers it up to 24 hours after posting, I want you to receive the information in the most timely manner.

 

To Keep up with daily postings on astrology, follow me at:

http://soulastrology.wordpress.com/blog/

 

I will parallel posts on Scoop.It for a couple more weeks 

I look forward to continuing our connections.

 

Soul Astrologer

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Awaken from the Illusion of Separateness

Awaken from the Illusion of Separateness | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"We are here to awaken from our illusion of separateness"

- Thich Nhat Hanh

   
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Our Unique Image - James Hillman

Our Unique Image - James Hillman | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"Each life is formed by its unique image, an image that is the essence of that life and calls it to a destiny. As the force of fate, this image acts as a personal daimon, an accompanying guide who remembers your calling." (James Hillman)


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Our Unique Image - James Hillman

Our Unique Image - James Hillman | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"Each life is formed by its unique image, an image that is the essence of that life and calls it to a destiny. As the force of fate, this image acts as a personal daimon, an accompanying guide who remembers your calling." (James Hillman)


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Depth Psychology List - Self-psychopathology-struggle-growth

Depth Psychology List - Self-psychopathology-struggle-growth | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"One way to the experience of the Self is by means of our psychopathology, since an archetypal strand of the Self is found within it. We can carry our own wounds with the realization that they both derive from the Self and are healed by the Self. Our struggle now is for conscious participation in this process rather than for vicarious sacrifice; each individual must make his or her own sacrifice as demanded by the Self." ~Lionel Corbett, The Religious Function of the Psyche (pp. 110-11) (click title for more depth psychology image quotes

 

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Jung, Steiner, and Evolution of Consciousness - Patricia Damery

Jung, Steiner, and Evolution of Consciousness - Patricia Damery | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The common ground of carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner offers keys to an evolution of consciousness through their common ancestor, Goethe...

 

Although contemporaries, Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner never met. And although they did not have much good to say about the other, they shared a common philosophical ancestor, Wolfgang von Goethe. (Rumor has it that Jung may have shared more than a philosophical lineage as his grandfather may have been an illegitimate offspring of Goethe’s!) Both men studied Goethe’s book length poem Faust as teenagers, Jung at the suggestion of his mother, and Steiner encouraged by a teacher who was editing Faust at the time.


Goethe’s work presents an alternative approach to the natural world and the psyche, from the mechanistic way that has developed since Descartes. It reflects an approach that perceives the whole as a living substance, whether that be the human psyche or the flower growing along the roadside. Goethe developed techniques to communicate with the living substance of a plant... Click title for more


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Carl Jung on the Symbol of the “Diamond”

Carl Jung on the Symbol of the “Diamond” | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

So it is the same idea as in alchemy—that the earth had been transformed into a transparent, waterlike, yet hard and imperishable, incorruptible structure. 

Therefore, the philosopher’s stone is the expression of the highest perfection of the earthly body, and, therefore, you also find the idea that the lapis philosophorum is man himself, that is, his corpus glorificatum, his body at the Resurrection.

This immortal body is the subtle body that had left the physical body and is beyond corruption. The diamond, the hardest mineral, is synonymous with the lapis philosophorum. This is ancient metaphysics, old speculation in symbolic form.

What does this mean psychologically?... (Click title for more)


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Psyche, Eros, and Aphrodite: The Beauty/Soul Connection - Myth and More

Psyche, Eros, and Aphrodite: The Beauty/Soul Connection - Myth and More | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The myth of Psyche (the word psyche means “soul” in Greek), Cupid, her invisible lover (Eros in Greek), and Cupid’s mother, the goddess of beauty and love, Venus (Aphrodite in Greek), illustrates how deeply Beauty, Soul, and Love are interrelated.

 

This relationship can show up in a modern context of the spa experience.  The many spa treatments readily available might be presumed to be merely pampering and possibly even decadent. However, if approached in the right frame of mind, they have the potential to touch us deeply and nurture the soul.

 

STORY OVERVIEW

The story of “The Invisible Lover” is a chapter from the greater work of The Metamorphoses (also known as... (Click title for more)...

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Carl Jung on Wonder and Gratitude

Carl Jung on Wonder and Gratitude | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

“If our religion is based on salvation, our chief emotions will be fear and trembling. If our religion is based on wonder, our chief emotion will be gratitude.” ~C.G. Jung

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Carl Jung, John Weir Perry, and Emotion in Dreams

Carl Jung, John Weir Perry, and Emotion in Dreams | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The important but limited focus of the more cognitive and problem solving modes of therapy tend to hurry over deeper personal needs and truths, in my opinion. Those invaluable core sources of meaning are just waiting to be revealed; by including dreams in therapy, or in our peer-to-peer conversations for those of us with lived experience.


I always encourage the people I serve to bring their dreams to our therapy sessions, because I know how valuable understanding what our dreams are telling us can be. Every night our unconscious psyches process enormous amounts of emotional content that is symbolically portrayed in imagery. This dreaming work of our deep psyches is so vital, that if we are kept from dreaming for a few nights, we will start to hallucinate, and soon will enter a so-called psychotic or extreme state of consciousness.


But every morning we have the chance to shed light on what our deepest desires, fears and individual life purpose is revealing – if we attend to our dreams. The best way I have found to explore dreams comes from what Jung told Perry...(click title for more)

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Depth Insights » "Wotan in the Shadows: Analytical Psychology and the Archetypal Roots of War" by Ritske Rensma

Depth Insights » "Wotan in the Shadows: Analytical Psychology and the Archetypal Roots of War" by Ritske Rensma | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung lived in a time of crisis. He was confronted with the atrocities of two world wars, spent his final years in the climate of the cold war, and was hugely concerned about mankind’s inability to find solutions to the recurring occurrences of mass conflict he was forced to witness in his lifetime. It should come as no surprise, then, that Jung wrote extensively about the possible causes of war and conflict. A central notion which he defended throughout his career was that the roots of war are to be found in the human psyche, in what he called our “war-like instincts,” which we will never be able to eradicate:


"Anything that disappears from your psychological inventory is apt to turn up in the guise of a hostile neighbor, who will inevitably arouse your anger and make you aggressive. It is surely better to know that your worst enemy is right there in your own heart. Man‘s war-like instincts are ineradicable – therefore a state of perfect peace is unthinkable..."


- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/wotan-in-the-shadows-analytical-psychology-and-the-archetypal-roots-of-war-by-dr-ritske-rensma/#sthash.kSBbesZw.dpuf

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On wounding... from Rumi

On wounding... from Rumi | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"The wound is the place where the light enters you"~ Rumi

http://depthpsychologylist.com/Rumi-wound-is-where-light-enters

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Jung on Active Imagination: Key readings selected by Joan Chodorow

Jung on Active Imagination: Key readings selected by Joan Chodorow | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Book review by Tasha Tollman

 

Joan Chodorow, dance therapist, analyst and analyst member of the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco combed through volumes of Jung’s writings and lectures to bring us this collection of Jung’s writings on Active Imagination. Fascinating for me was the insight into the many different names Jung used for this process – transcendent function, picture method, active fantasy, active phantasying, trancing, visioning, exercises, dialectical method, technique of differentiation, technique of introversion, introspection and technique of the descent – before settling on the term Active Imagination.


Chodorow introduces the topic, beginning with Jung’s ‘Confrontation with the Unconscious’, following his break with Freud in 1912/1913.  During this period Jung entered a period of disorientation and intense inner turmoil: 

“He suffered from lethargy and fears; his moods threatened to overwhelm him.  He had to find a way, a method to heal himself from within. Since he didn’t know what to do, he decided to engage with the impulses and images of the unconscious.” (p.1)...(Click title for more....)


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maria taveras's curator insight, November 29, 2014 4:04 PM

Joan Chodorow is a colleague whose work I respect and value deeply. Dream  Art: Art, Active Imagination and the Creative Process is a paper which evolved once I had read and understood  Chodorow's work of "Jung on:  Active Imagination." Thank you, with gratitude for all of your contribution to Depth Psychology. Maria Taveras, Jungian analyst.