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Ghost Stories and Haunted Places: The Archetypes of Hauntings

Ghost Stories and Haunted Places: The Archetypes of Hauntings | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

When I read about folklore and even when I hear ghost stories that are true ghost stories, I hear patterns in them that correspond a little with Jung's archetypes.  Carl Jung was an early psychologist who believed  in something called a collective unconscious.  He believed all people drew their thoughts from a similar source and this accounted for why people from every different culture had myths and stories that were very similar without ever having known each other. 

 

For example; most cultures have a dragon myth and a Cinderella story. He also believed we all had universal symbols that we use to interpret the world.  Jung's main archetypes included the Great Mother, the wise old man, the child, the beautiful woman, the devil, the trickster, the scarecrow, and the shadow. These archetypes symbolize core desires within us. I think many of the hauntings I've explored fall into similar archetypes as these and I'm going to break down and explain some of these hauntings....

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Megan Kopke's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:31 PM

jung's archetypes in stories - ghost stories, fairy tales, etc. 

Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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Planet Beehive—An eco-depth-psychological look at bees, philosophy, and culture

Planet Beehive—An eco-depth-psychological look at bees, philosophy, and culture | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
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Why the World Doesn't End - Michael Meade

Why the World Doesn't End - Michael Meade | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Fears of the end have been with us from the very beginning. Endings and beginnings are mythic moments par excellence; they depict the extremes of existence and are the bookends of creation. There are countless stories of how it all began, and tales of apocalyptic endings can be found in many cultures.

 

Humans are naturally myth-makers and storytellers. We find our way by "storying" the world around us. We turn everything into a news story or a dramatic tale that helps make sense of the ever-changing, often threatening events of the world. Whether it is a major storm, a horrifying massacre, a new scandal or the threat of war, we look for elements of the story that can help us understand what is happening to us.

 

To be alive at this time means to be exposed to great uncertainty and to feel the raw forces of nature as well as the rough edges and sharp divisions of culture. It is not simply that the air has become dangerously polluted and overheated, or that the political atmosphere is increasingly poisonous and destructive. We live amidst rapid changes, increasing fears and devastating tragedies. We suffer increasing extremes that include... (click title for more)

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Jungian Depth Psychology Quotes & Images

Jungian Depth Psychology Quotes & Images | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
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Lessons of Jung's Encounter with Native Americans

Lessons of Jung's Encounter with Native Americans | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1973) Jung described his encounter with Native Americans he met in New Mexico in 1925.  This event, though brief, had a profound effect on Jung, and he referred to it many times in his writings. He commented that his experience in New Mexico made him aware of his imprisonment "in the cultural consciousness of the white man" (Jung, 1973, p. 247).


At the Taos pueblo, Jung spoke for the first time with a non-white, a Hopi elder named Antonio Mirabal (also known as Ochwiay Biano and Mountain Lake), who said that whites were always uneasy and restless: "We do not understand them. We think that they are mad" (Jung, 1973, p. 248). Jung asked him why he thought the whites were mad, and the reply was " 'They say that they think with their heads . . . . We think here,' he said, indicating his heart" (p. 248).


Impressed, Jung said he realized that Mountain Lake had unveiled a significant truth about whites. To Jung the Indians he met appeared to be tranquil and dignified, which Jung attributed to their belief that (as Mountain Lake explained) through their religious practice, they helped the sun cross the sky every day. Jung believed this belief and practice served the function of making the Indians' ... (Click title for more)

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Soul-Making and Spiritual Cliche' Busting: James Hillman: Postmodern Romantic Reductionist, and Trickster

Soul-Making and Spiritual Cliche' Busting: James Hillman: Postmodern Romantic Reductionist, and Trickster | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

  For more than a decade James Hillman has been my favorite writer and most influential teacher. I discovered him in 1996 when The Soul's Code was published, which I devoured, or perhaps more rightly stated, which devoured me. My ideational world was turned inside out. From The Soul's Code I went on to read Hillman's opus,Re-Visioning Psychology.


It is no exaggeration to say that the Ideas from this Pulitzer Prize nominated book changed practically everything about the way I viewed psyche, religion, myself, others and the larger world--specifically through the four main chapters titled Personifying, Pathologizing, Psychologizing, and Dehumanizing, which the author describes as "four ideas necessary for the soul-making process" (ix).


His view ofpathologizing was especially revolutionary, helping me to make room for emotional suffering and psychic fragmentation in a culture obsessed with chronic emotional well being and wholeness. ... Click title for more

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Eva Rider's curator insight, July 10, 10:26 PM

from Michaelbolgar Blog spot on James Hillman and Soul Making.

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A Skin for the Imaginal

A Skin for the Imaginal | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

My interest in the psychological function of the skin began when several years ago I was doing research into Jung's infancy and childhood, and the impact that this had upon the evolution of his psychology (Feldman 1992).


In Memories, Dreams, Reflections (Jung 1961), Jung's autobiography, written when he was eighty-three years old, he talks about his infancy and childhood with a great deal of candour and insight. When Jung was three years old his mother was hospitalized for what appears to have been a severe depression. She was hospitalized in a Swiss psychiatric hospital for several months, and Jung says that her hospitalization was related to difficulties that were surfacing in the parental relationship.


During his mother's absence he was taken care of by a maid. He also developed a severe skin disorder, eczema that he connected with the separation of his parents and his mother's hospitalization.

I thought it probable that Jung's severe eczema was linked to the sense of psychic catastrophe that he experienced upon his separation from his mother. It was as if he was unable to contain tortuous and painful emotions within himself and they burst out in a somatic form as a severe skin disorder... (Click title for more)

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Pomegranates: symbolism in mysticism and dreams

Pomegranates: symbolism in mysticism and dreams | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Last night I dreamed of pomegranates...

 

Carl Jung saw a garden of pomegranates when he was near to death: "“I myself was, so it seemed, in the Pardes Rimmonim, the garden of pomegranates, and the wedding of Tifereth with Malchuth was taking place. Or else I was Rabbi Simon ben Jochai, whose wedding in the afterlife was being celebrated. It was the mystic marriage as it appears in the Cabbalistic tradition. I cannot tell you how wonderful it was. I could only think continually, “Now this is the garden of pomegranates! Now this is the marriage.. (Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 26, 2:47 AM

The Pomegranate: Symbol of the fruit of the Underworld and perhaps,  thus signifying the marriage of the above and below. Tifereth (Beauty) and its married to Malkuth (kingdom). Love redeemed and made manifest in Matter. Lovely!

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Wounded Healer

Wounded Healer | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Wounded Healer: An archetypal dynamic that may be constellated in an analytic relationship.


This term derives from the legend of Asclepius, a Greek doctor who in recognition of his own wounds established a sanctuary at Epidaurus where others could be healed of their ‘wounds’.


Those seeking to be cured went through a process called incubation. First they had a cleansing bath, thought to have a purifying effect on the soul as well as the body. Uncontaminated by the body, the soul was free to commune with the gods. After preliminary sacrificial offerings, the incubants lay on a couch and went to sleep. If they were lucky, they had a healing dream; if they were luckier, a snake came in the night and bit them.


The wounded healer archetype can be schematized by a variation of the diagram used by Jung to illustrate the lines of communication in a relationship...(click title for more)

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Soul Spelunker » Search for the Gods

Soul Spelunker » Search for the Gods | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The old alchemists used various ores in their work. They considered “metals as seeds” (Hillman 2522), lead being a seed of Saturn, copper a seed of Venus, silver a seed of the Moon, etc. These ores were not understood as objects separate from the imaginative minds of the observers. Just like seeds, they visualized them as possessing “encoded intentionality” (Hillman 2527), the innate tendency to fulfill their destinies, metamorphosing into what they were intended to become. These metals were viewed as ensouled entities, or what I would refer to as animaterial entities.


Via Zeteticus, Eva Rider
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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 17, 4:56 AM

From Saturn to the Sun; Lead into Gold and all the rich nuance connecting the properties of alchemical metals to planetary energies. what feast for the archetypal astrologers and depth psychologists.. alchemists of the 21st C.

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The Psychoanalytic Muse: Edward Edinger: The Ego-Self Axis

The Psychoanalytic Muse: Edward Edinger: The Ego-Self Axis | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In what follows we shall be using three terms repeatedly to describe different forms of relatedness between ego and self. These terms should perhaps be introduced at the outset. They are: ego-self identity, ego-self separation, and ego-self axis. The meaning of these terms is indicated by the following figures representing progressive stages in the relationship between ego and self.


Clinical observation leads one to the conclusion that the integrity and stability of the ego depend in all stages of development on a living connection with the self...

Damage to the ego-self axis leads to ego-self alienation. In this condition the ego loses, to a greater or lesser extent, its vital contact with the self—the ego's origin and source of energy and stability. Although ego-self alienation ... (Click title for more)

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Carl Jung and I Ching

Carl Jung and I Ching | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In his introduction to the English version of I Ching made by one of his acquaintance, Jung admits having practiced the oracle 30 years before meeting Richard Wilhelm, the German translator of the book. He was interested in the method of exploration of the unconscious. He said:

 

"For more than thirty years I have interested myself in this oracle technique, or method of exploring the unconscious, for it has seemed to me of uncommon significance. I was already fairly familiar with the I Ching when I first met Wilhelm in the early nineteen twenties; he confirmed for me then what I already knew, and taught me many things more. (Foreword to the I Ching) ."

 

Using the oracle with his patients in psychotherapy Jung could remember a great deal of meaningful answers. He recalled the story of a patient stuck between ambivalent feelings related to... (Click title for more)

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Memories, Dreams, Reflections: A Rare Glimpse Inside Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung’s Mind

Memories, Dreams, Reflections: A Rare Glimpse Inside Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung’s Mind | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
"…the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being."

 

In the spring of 1957, at the age of 84, legendary psychiatrist Carl Jung (July 26, 1875–June 6, 1961) set out to tell his life’s story. He embarked upon a series of conversations with his colleague and friend, Aniela Jaffe, which he used as the basis for the text.

 

At times, so powerful was his drive for expression that he wrote entire chapters by hand. He continued to work on the manuscript until shortly before his death in 1961. The result was Memories, Dreams, Reflections — a fascinating peek behind the curtain of Jung’s mind, revealing... (Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 21, 12:47 AM

This is Jung's only autobiography and it continues to live and deepen our understanding into the humaness that was Jung and offer solace for those of us who seek meaning to the mysteries of the soul throughout life and beyond. I have it at my fingertips always.

 

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A Jungian Analyst Talks about Psychological Types

A Jungian Analyst Talks about Psychological Types | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

John Beebe, M.D., is a Jungian analyst, editor of the San Francisco Jung Library Journal, co-editor of the Journal of Analytical Psychology, and an expert on Jung's psychological types.

While many people have become familiar with psychological types as a way of examining the differences between people, Dr. Beebe has been pioneering their use intrapsychically as a way to explore the depths of the psyche.


Trained at the Jung Institute in San Francisco with its strong tradition of interest in typology, in this wonderfully informal interview he gives us an intimate glimpse of what this neglected dimension of typology looks like in practice. He explains how his analysands often come to their own insights into their psychological types, and how he, himself, discovered the importance of dreams through his own depression, and encountered his own anima in the form of a Chinese laundress. And he deals with related questions about types and archetypes, and types and the inferior... (Click title for more)

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Mystical Emergence: An Architectural Journey Through Jung's Tower

Mystical Emergence: An Architectural Journey Through Jung's Tower | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Houses are where we begin and end each day. They shape our patterns of living and contain our relationships. We cook, eat, sleep, procreate, study, raise children, store our belongings, make our plans for the future, and interact with each other within them. They frame our view of the outside world, while providing privacy for our interior lives.


Paradoxically, they conceal our deepest secrets while transparently displaying our values, tastes, and social status through their form and style. Yet, despite the extremely personal role our houses play in our lives, few of us actually design or build them ourselves anymore. More often, like the resourceful hermit crab, we move into the best shells that we can find. We rely on the skills of architects, contractors, and interior designers to shape or remodel our homes to fit our personal tastes. The elusive goal of achieving the ideal home seduces us endlessly to fantasize a “dream house” where our lives are imagined as complete, in perfect harmony between a person and a place.


Magazines, newspapers and television run stories about them twenty-four hours a day. Home tours of the rich and famous satisfy our voyeuristic interest in seeing how others live. Recently, this hype and longing for gorgeous, seductive architecture has been referred to as “yuppie porn.” Yet, it is human nature to be interested in where and how other people live. This is especially true of such deeply personal places as Carl Jung’s private retreat at Bollingen... (Click title for more)

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Review: "A New Earth" by Eckhart Tolle

Beneath the surface, everything is connected with everything else and also connected to the Source of all life. When you first hold on to an object without naming it, you feel its essence, which is the same as your essence or Being.

 

When you do not cover the world with words, a miracle of newness and freshness is experienced by your essential self. One must disentangled oneself with all the forms that one has been mixed up with of so far. This disentanglement is what this book is all about. The faster one labels things the more intelligent one becomes, but the less wisdom one has.

 

The Illusion of self. The words “I”, “me”, “my” and “mine” are the most frequently used and also the most misleading. “I” embodies the primordial error, a misconception of who you are, an illusory sense of identity. This is the ego. This illusory sense of self is according to Albert Einstein “an optical illusion of consciousness.” That illusory self then becomes the basis for all further interpretations or rather misinterpretations of reality, all thought processes, interactions, and relationships ... (Click title for more)

 

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Dimitris Tsantaris's curator insight, July 14, 3:51 PM

Even if it flirts with commercialised/pop new-ageism, Tolle's "A New Earth" is a great book with very interesting and useful concepts.

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Quotes from C.G. Jung On The Shadow

Quotes from C.G. Jung On The Shadow | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Unfortunately there can be no doubt that man is, on the whole, less good than he imagines himself or wants to be. Everyone carries a shadow, and the less it is embodied in the individual's conscious life, the blacker and denser it is. If an inferiority is conscious, one always has a chance to correct it. Furthermore, it is constantly in contact with other interests, so that it is continually subjected to modifications. But if it is repressed and isolated from consciousness, it never gets corrected.
"Psychology and Religion" (1938). In CW 11: Psychology and Religion: West and East. P.131
"Taking it in its deepest sense, the shadow is the invisible saurian tail that man still drags behind him. Carefully amputated, it becomes the healing serpent of the mysteries. Only monkeys parade with it.The Integration of the Personality. (1939) (Click title for more)
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THE WOUNDED HEALER

THE WOUNDED HEALER | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

One of the deeper, underlying archetypal patterns which is being constellated in the human psyche that is playing itself out collectively on the world stage is the archetype of the “wounded healer.” To quote Kerenyi, a colleague of Jung who elucidated this archetype, the wounded healer refers psychologically to the capacity “to be at home in the darkness of suffering and there to find germs of light and recovery with which, as though by enchantment, to bring forth Asclepius, the sunlike healer.”


The archetype of the wounded healer reveals to us that it is only by being willing to face, consciously experience and go through our wound do we receive its blessing. To go through our wound is to embrace, assent, and say “yes” to the mysteriously painful new place in ourselves where the wound is leading us. Going through our wound, we can allow ourselves to be re-created by the wound.


Our wound is not a static entity, but rather a continually unfolding dynamic process that manifests, reveals and incarnates itself through us, which is to say that our wound is teaching us something about ourselves. Going through our wound means realizing we will never again be the same when we get to the other side of ... Click title for more

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Eva Rider's curator insight, July 10, 1:11 AM

Looking to the placement  of Chiron in the astrological chart, offers both clues and keys to healing inner Chiron , the wounded healer in us all.

 

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The Red Book of C. G. Jung: Jung on Self and God

The Red Book of C. G. Jung: Jung on Self and God | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Few of Jung’s ideas have enlisted as much interest and controversy both within and beyond psychology as Jung’s equation of the God archetype with the Self. Especially in his later works, Jung is careful to point out that this equation is purely psychological in nature and he means to imply nothing about the nature of an actual metaphysical deity, the existence of which, Jung says, is beyond the scope of his purely empirical inquiry.


Such disclaimers, however, have not deterred others from reading between the lines and deriving from Jung the view that in our own time the transcendent God has died and divinity has been reborn in mankind (Altizer), that Jung adopted an almost solipsistic Gnosticism in which God is discovered through an immersion in the self rather than through an “I-thou” encounter with others (Buber), or even that Jung created an oral tradition, parallel to his writings, that set himself up as a spiritual prophet .. (Click title for more)

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Carl Jung's Near Death Experience

Carl Jung's Near Death Experience | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In a hospital in Switzerland in 1944, the world-renowned psychiatrist Carl G. Jung, had a heart attack and then a near-death experience. His vivid encounter with the light, plus the intensely meaningful insights led Jung to conclude that his experience came from something real and eternal. Jung’s experience is unique in that he saw the Earth from a vantage point of about a thousand miles above it. 

His incredibly accurate view of the Earth from outer space was described about two decades before astronauts in space first described it. Subsequently, as he reflected on life after death, Jung recalled the meditating Hindu from his near-death experience and read it as a parable of the archetypal Higher Self, the God-image within. Carl Jung, who founded analytical psychology, centered on the archetypes of the collective unconscious. The following is an excerpt from his autobiography

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The Famous Letter Where Freud Breaks His Relationship with Jung (1913)

The Famous Letter Where Freud Breaks His Relationship with Jung (1913) | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

“ Freud and Jung. Jung and Freud. History has closely associated these two who did so much examination of the mind in early 20th-century Europe, but the simple connection of their names belies a much more complicated relationship between the men themselves.”


Via Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts), Erel Shalit
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Snake Symbol Significance in Dreams

Snake Symbol Significance in Dreams | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The ouroboros, the snake forever swallowing its own tail, is a famous alchemical symbol of transformation. Jung saw the ouroboros much like he saw the mandala, as an archetypal template of the psyche symbolizing eternity and the law of endless return. Instead of looking at life as a finite game played between the bookends of birth and death, the ouroboros symbolizes a dynamic state of change and purification.

 

A literal ouroboros isn’t necessary for a dream to have its symbolic meaning. Since waking life snakes routinely shed their skins, they are ready made symbols for change and transformation. Dreams where snakes shed skin or seeing snake skins in a dream also symbolize change and transformation. Old, outgrown behavioral patterns, relationships, or even... (Click title for more)

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What a Shaman Sees In a Mental Hospital

What a Shaman Sees In a Mental Hospital | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The Shamanic View of Mental Illness In the shamanic view, mental illness signals “the birth of a healer,” explains Malidoma Patrice Somé.  Thus, mental disorders are spiritual emergencies, spiritual crises, and need to be regarded as such to aid the healer in being born.

 

What those in the West view as mental illness, the Dagara people regard as “good news from the other world.”  The person going through the crisis has been chosen as a medium for a message to the community that needs to be communicated from the spirit realm. 


“Mental disorder, behavioral disorder of all kinds, signal the fact that two obviously incompatible energies have merged into the same field,” says Dr. Somé.  These disturbances result when the person does not get assistance in dealing with the presence of the energy from the spirit realm... (Click title for more)

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Foreword to the I Ching - By C. G. Jung

Foreword to the I Ching - By C. G. Jung | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Carl Jung's foreward to the "Book of Changes" about the IChing 

 

Since I am not a sinologue, a foreword to the Book of Changes from my hand must be a testimonial of my individual experience with this great and singular book. It also affords me a welcome opportunity to pay tribute again to the memory of my late friend, Richard Wilhelm. He himself was profoundly aware of the cultural significance of his translation of the I Ching, a version unrivaled in the West.

 

If the meaning of the Book of Changes were easy to grasp, the work would need no foreword. But this is far from being the case, for there is so much that is obscure about it that Western scholars have tended to dispose of it as a collection of "magic spells," either too abstruse to be intelligible, or of no value whatsoever. Legge's translation of the I Ching, up to now the only version available in English, has done little to make the work accessible to Western minds.[1]Wilhelm, however, has made every effort to open the way to an understanding of the symbolism of the text...

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Jungian Fairy Tale Interpretation

Jungian Fairy Tale Interpretation | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Who hasn’t remembered the experience of listening to a fairy tale as a child? Why were we so enthralled by these tales? Are these stories for adults or children? How do they differ from myths, legends and sagas?

 

I am going to interpret this fairy tale using a Jungian approach, and, as I do, try to explain some of the reasoning behind what I am doing. There are particular issues to bear in mind as we do this together : the whole tale is a description of the psychodynamics of an individuation process in one psyche, and, all characters in the tale represent structures in the psyche.

 

One thing I do know having worked with, and taught fairy tale interpretation, is that strong emotions are stirred up by our interaction with tales. People’s complexes and typology are constellated in uncanny ways through this work. The most common error one can make is to take a fairy tale character and expect human or... (Click title for more)

 

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People’s complexes and typology are constellated in uncanny ways through fairy tales

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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 9, 4:49 AM
Fairy tales really are incomparable teaching tools for us about the personal complexes and how they interface with the collective. The bridge matter and spirit via the cultural imagination. What is most extraordinary, I find, exploring them now, as an adult, is how precisely fairy tales detail the alchemical processes that point us towards Individuation and the redemption. They are a imagination's blueprint for the soul journey.
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The Art of Focus

The Art of Focus | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
The secret to winning the internal battle against distraction is not to say “no” to trivial things but to say “yes” to powerful longings.

Via Erel Shalit
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