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Roles of a Shaman: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 3

Roles of a Shaman: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 3 | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The various roles in which a shaman undertakes are closely related to the cultures that one is likely to find shamanism (Walsh, 1989). This is because a shaman plays many roles for their culture. The cultures in which we are likely to find shamans are “simple nomadic hunting and gathering societies” (p. 8).


In these kinds of cultures, people do not generally rely on agriculture and have very little political organization or social class. As such, the shaman is left to play many roles: “medicine man, healer, ritualist, keeper of cultural myths, medium, and master of spirits” (p. 8). Krippner (2000) stated similar roles that shamans play: “Shamans were probably humanity’s original specialists, combining the roles of healers, storytellers, weather forecasters, performing artists, ritualists, and magicians” (p. 98).


Krippner (2002) added “shamans appear to have been humankind’s first psychotherapists [and] first physicians” (p. 970). References to shamans as physicians can be seen more than once in the literature. Shortly, we will liken a shaman to a ‘general practitioner... (click title for more)

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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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The Jung-Neumann Letters

The Jung-Neumann Letters | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The long awaited publication of the Correspondence between C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann promises to be a landmark event in the history of analytical psychology.


The Jung-Neumann Letters, edited by Martin Liebscher, is due to be published by Princeton University Press early spring 2015. To mark this important event, an international conference is being planned, to be jointly sponsored by The Foundation for the Works of C.G. Jung, the Neumann family, The Philemon Foundation, The International Association of Analytical Psychology, and The Israel Institute of Jungian Psychology.


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Erel Shalit's curator insight, April 15, 6:15 AM

The long awaited publication of the Correspondence between C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann promises to be a landmark event in the history of analytical psychology. The Jung-Neumann Letters, edited by Martin Liebscher, is due to be published by Princeton University Press early spring 2015. To mark this important event, an international conference is being planned, to be jointly sponsored by The Foundation for the Works of C.G. Jung, the Neumann family, The Philemon Foundation, The International Association of Analytical Psychology, and The Israel Institute of Jungian Psychology.

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Eva Rider's curator insight, April 15, 5:39 PM

Noteworthy news.

 

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Jungian Erel Shalit on Psyche, Culture, and Civilization

Jungian Erel Shalit on Psyche, Culture, and Civilization | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

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Erel Shalit's curator insight, April 15, 6:13 AM

A legend tells us that at the very moment the children of Israel went into the Red Sea, Mount Moriah began to move from its place, along with the altar for Isaac that had been built upon it. The whole scene had been arranged before the creation of the world. Isaac was bound and placed upon the altar, and Abraham raised his knife. Read more

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Do Not Lose Heart: Awakening Women - Clarissa Pinkola Estes

Do Not Lose Heart: Awakening Women - Clarissa Pinkola Estes | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

One of the most calming and powerful actions you can do to intervene in a stormy world is to stand up and show your soul. Soul on deck shines like gold in dark times.


Do not lose heart. We were made for these times. I’ve heard from so many recently who are deeply and properly bewildered, concerned about the state of affairs in our world right now. Ours is a time of almost daily astonishment and often righteous rage over the latest degradations of what matters most to civilized, visionary people.

 

You are right in your assessments. The lustre and hubris some have aspired to while endorsing acts so heinous against children, elders, everyday people, the poor, the unguarded, the helpless, is breathtaking. 


For years, we’ve been learning, practicing, training and just waiting to meet on this exact plain of engagement. I grew up on the Great Lakes and recognize a seaworthy vessel when I see one. Regarding awakened souls, there have never been more able crafts in the waters than there are... (Click title to read entire article)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, April 14, 8:24 PM

Marvellous and inspiring article! Take heart; sailors on the Soul Journey! "Show you soul. Soul on deck shines like gold in dark times".

 

 

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Jung on Symbols

Jung on Symbols | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung distinguished between a symbol and a sign. Insignia on uniforms, for instance, are not symbols but signs that identify the wearer. In dealing with unconscious material (dreams, fantasies, etc.), the images can be interpreted semiotically, as symptomatic signs pointing to known or knowable facts, or symbolically, as expressing something essentially unknown....

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Laura Smith's curator insight, April 11, 5:16 AM

Many images are symbols that live in our shared collective conscious, but when one shows up in a dream it also speaks to something very specific and personal in us.

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DEVASTATING THE EARTH and ANIMALS: THE FUTILITY OF WAR--by Jane Goodall

DEVASTATING THE EARTH and ANIMALS: THE FUTILITY OF WAR--by Jane Goodall | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In 1960 I began my study of chimpanzees on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in what is now Tanzania. At that time chimpanzee habitat stretched for miles, fringing the lake from Burundi to Zambia in the south. Today, the scene is very different: cultivated land crowds up to the boundaries of the park, the trees have gone, peasants are trying to grow crops on the steep rocky hillsides, causing terrible erosion, the soil is losing its fertility, the forest animals have gone, and the human population is struggling to survive.


What has caused this devastation? Wild animals (as well as livestock) are often direct casualties of war. Soldiers as well as refugees hunt wildlife for food. According to the Biodiversity Support Program, war in the DRC in 1996 and 1997 led to an escalation in poaching in one area that reduced the elephant population by half, buffalo by two-thirds, and hippo by three-quarters. Gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos, already seriously endangered by the commercial bush meat trade, were also affected. Not only do land mines maim innocent humans - hundreds of animals...(Click title for more)

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Psychotherapy Based on Depth Psychology is a Superior Approach-Lionel Corbett

http://www.pacifica.edu/psychotherapy.aspx Psychotherapists who are interested in Depth Psychology are living in a professional world that is dominated by co...

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Eva Rider's curator insight, March 31, 10:26 PM

This is a profound discourse by Dr. Lionel Corbett on the importance and efficacy of depth psychology for true healing and support of the individuation process. It examines the narrow and rigid psychological theoretical base that has been imposed by corporate interests for many decades leading the individual towards adaption to the infrastructure as opposed to inhabiting one's unique destiny.

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The Wisdom of Women

The Wisdom of Women | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The wisdom of women consists not only in their individual contributions but also in their association with men in the nurture and well-being of life in all its forms: cosmological, social, economic, familial, and personal. This wisdom flourished throughout the Neolithic period of Western civilization. Now, after surviving in a suppressed condition throughout the patriarchal history of modern Europe and America, the wisdom of women is re-asserting itself in all phases of human activity.


In its full religious-spiritual expression, the wisdom of women seems to have developed in late Paleolithic times with the concept of the Great Goddess as the primordial source and destiny of the universe. Not a matriarchy, the Great-Goddess culture was a cosmology encompassing the origin and destiny of all... (click title for more)

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A glossary of Jungian terms.

A glossary of Jungian terms. | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

A glossary of Jungian terms collected by depth psychologist Dr. Craig Chalquist in his journey through Jung's letters, seminars, and Collected Works as well as from my studies in Depth Psychology. Terms defined elsewhere in this document appear in italics. You might also want to peruse the Glossary of Freudian Terms and some quotations by James Hillman and Alfred Adler. 

 

"The alchemists thought that the opus demanded not only laboratory work, the reading of books, meditation, and patience, but also love..." (Click title to read more)

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ARE WE POSSESSED?

ARE WE POSSESSED? | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

C. G. Jung, the great doctor of the soul and one of the most inspired psychologists of the twentieth century, had incredible insight into what is currently playing out, both individually and collectively, in our modern-day world. He writes, “If, for a moment, we look at mankind as one individual, we see that it is like a man carried away by unconscious powers.” We are a species carried away — “possessed” by — and acting out, the unconscious. (Image from Lantern Hollow Press)

 

Jung elaborates, “Possession, though old-fashioned, has by no means become obsolete; only the name has changed. Formerly they spoke of ‘evil spirits,’ now we call them ‘neurosis’ or ‘unconscious complexes.’” To condescendingly think that we, as modern-day, rational people, are too sophisticated to believe in something as primitive as demons is to have fallen under the spell of the very evil spirits we are imagining are nonexistent. What the ancients call demons are a psychic phenomena which compel us to act out behaviors contrary to our best intentions...

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Eva Rider's curator insight, March 19, 10:28 PM

Are we possessed? Addiction is possession. How do we awaken and break the spell?

Laura Smith's curator insight, March 20, 8:31 AM

An extremely long and interesting article about how we become a slave to our false perceptions of who we are and of who we think others are...In Archetypal Dreamwork, we refer to pathology as the "demon" that gets in and takes over, driving us to act or believe in ways that are not true to our soul. As a colleague stated recently, pathology is a force that moves us further from God, or said differently, further from our soul. Mr. Levy speaks, as did Jung, about the "mass possession" in which a whole group or society suffers from and acts out the neurosis. Perhaps our continual pursuit of the proverbial "more" is and example of this and the devastation to our planet is the consequence.

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Introduction to the Special Edition on Thomas Berry's The Great Work

Introduction to the Special Edition on Thomas Berry's The Great Work | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In The Great Work Thomas Berry invites a deep reflection on our current ecological and cultural predicament. The move through this era of enormous cultural transition, from a period of human devastation of the Earth to—potentially—a period of benign presence, is the ‘great work’ that we must undertake if we are to fulfil the historical exigencies of our time.

 

Thomas Berry, cultural historian, is a remarkable and influential thinker on the complexities of this era and the requirements of a viable future. Berry, a Catholic priest, trained in the classical traditions of theology, immersed himself in a comprehensive investigation of the phenomenon of religion, and in particular Eastern religions. He taught Eastern religions at several U.S. universities prior to founding the PhD program in The Histories of Religions at Fordham, from 1966-1979. Berry has written several books on Eastern Religions, such as Buddhism and The Religions of India,1 and during the past few decades has addressed his work to the magnitude of the crisis facing Western civilization.

 

To situate the essays within The Great Work as well as the responses to the book, it may be beneficial to know some of the key influences that have shaped Berry’s perspectives. Over the course of a lifetime, Berry has developed a deep appreciation for the intense and specific human experiences that give rise to distinct religious traditions and expressions. He could see that particular and penetrating  (Click title to read the full article)

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Exploring Depth Psychotherapy

Exploring Depth Psychotherapy | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Here’s a start to a few blog entries exploring important aspects of psychotherapy as practiced by depth psychologists of various stripes.


Let’s assume a basic working definition of depth psychotherapy. Let’s assume that it’s a form of therapy that goes out of its way to include the unconscious psyche in treatment. By unconscious psyche we mean at minimum certain dynamic patterns that are always at play beneath the surface of our awareness. Let’s assume that engaging the psyche stimulates growth and movement and often helps to ease problematic symptoms of emotional suffering.


So how does a therapist go about engaging the psyche? Truth is, there are lots of ways...(Click title to read full post)

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Zombie Apocalypse: a symbol of collective transformation

Zombie Apocalypse:  a symbol of collective transformation | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Given a plethora of television shows and films about zombies, what is a Jungian to see but a collective attempt to dream the unsayable.  Carl Jung showed that what cannot be worked through at the conscious level is often worked through at the unconscious level, in symbolic fantasy (CW 5, para 4-45).

 

 Encountering that for which there is yet no fantasy, we confront the limits of sense.  For the collective social body, film and art are an unconscious attempt to work through collective transformation at the limits of reason and sense.  In the case of zombie movies and the growing zombie apocalypse movement, we may be seeing an attempt to dream ‘apocalyptic’ change.

 

Zombie are the  ‘Undead’: not living, not dead, driven yet not alive, the zombie images emerge from the recesses of the collective unconscious.  Animated yet with out life, they move.  Driven, yet without desire, they seek. ....(Click title to read more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, January 22, 7:56 PM

T.V. Shows about Zombies and movies about being alone and adrift in the world, in the cosmos, in the stratosphere. We are floating and stranded between worlds. As systems break down, dissolve and transform. We find our old mythologies have lost their meaning and the new ones have not yet been formed. We are in an epoch of unprecedented change stretching the limits of our imaginations in our seeking for reanimating Body and Soul.

 

Mandy Webster's curator insight, February 7, 6:56 AM

A psychological explanation for the literary world's current obsession with zombies. The zombies are US!

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Scrooge Syndrome:Trauma, Embitterment and Spiritual Renewal

Scrooge Syndrome:Trauma, Embitterment and Spiritual Renewal | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

There is something special about this transitional season, as we move through the darkest and coldest days of the year toward the longer, warmer, and hopefully, brighter days to come. It seems that no matter how challenging, difficult, traumatic or discouraging the previous year may have been for many of us, these next ten days or so inspire us to let go of the past, to relinquish our frustration, disappointment, despair or resentment and look forward to the future with renewed hope, energy and optimism.

 

Psychologically, it is essential to do so, since hanging onto and wallowing in our rage, anger or hostility year after year, consciously or unconsciously, is what ultimately gives rise to Post-Traumatic Embitterment Disorder and so many other psychiatric syndromes. When chronically repressed, denied or deliberately clung to and cultivated, anger ... (Click title to read more)

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Love and lust the two eternal archetypes of “collective unconscious.”

Love and lust the two eternal archetypes of “collective unconscious.” | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Love (nurturing) and lust (hatred and selfishness) are two eternal archetypes of human nature and collective unconscious. These two archetypes can be merged into the bigger archetypes of mother earth and shadow as envisaged by the Jung.

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Jung and the Four Psychological Functions

Jung and the Four Psychological Functions | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In Psychological Types Jung (1971/1921) describes four basic psychic functions that are capable of becoming conscious: intuition, sensation, feeling, and thinking:

 

Under sensation I include all perceptions by means of the sense organs; by thinking, I mean the function of intellectual cognition and the forming of logical conclusions; feeling is a function of subjective evaluation; intuition I take as perception by way of the unconscious, or perception of unconscious events. (p. 518) 

 

   Jung goes on to explain that, in his experience, there are only four basic functions, a fact that seems to be self-evident if one inquires into the possibilities. These psychic functions are the methods employed by humans to acquire knowledge of themselves and the surrounding world; cognition is not restricted to one function, and each function provides its own kind of knowledge.

   Of equal importance in Jung's typology are the attitude types of introversion and extraversion, which... (click title to read more)

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Soul-Making and Spiritual Cliche' Busting: The Relationship of New Age Spirituality to Depth Psychology

Soul-Making and Spiritual Cliche' Busting: The Relationship of New Age Spirituality to Depth Psychology | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

For depth psychology, a sort of working distinction is sometimes made between soul and spirit—soul takes a person into the depths while spirit raises a person into the heights. Soul is a way of referencing human fragmentation and spirit refers to wholeness. Soul takes us into the darkness of hades while spirit takes us into the heavenly light and so forth.


Soul is often associated with the negative emotions of depression, panic, fear, sorrow, etc. Spirit on the other hand leads us into feelings of ecstasy, tranquility, courage and joy. Soul is often associated with death and disintegration while spirit is associated with life and integration. Soul’s depths are at the center for the depth psychologist; Spirit’s heights are at the heart of the New Age religions.


Using a popular New Age bestselling book as an example, we might say the New Age is about the spiritual Law of Attraction, while depth psychology is about the soulful Law of Subtraction... (Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, April 14, 1:07 PM

These are key distinctions between New Age Philosophy and Depth Psychology.

Soul can be seen as mediator between Spirit and Matter; integrating and synthesizing both in order to live with awareness of the above and below. Living from soul is no easy task. It demands that we be awake and aware of bringing  light into matter. In alchemical terms, we are creating gold from lead. For this to happen, a disintegration of dark, unconscious, old material is paramount to the process of transformation into a larger expanded experience of the Self. Ego surrenders and expands to open and receive the light of Spirit and identifies with Soul

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Wolfgang Pauli, Carl Jung, and the Acausal Connecting Principle: A Case Study in Transdisciplinarity

Wolfgang Pauli, Carl Jung, and the Acausal Connecting Principle: A Case Study in Transdisciplinarity | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Nicolescu’s quest for “a space of knowledge beyond the disciplines”4 is exemplified by the Pauli-Jung collaboration aimed at explication of a unifying or connecting principle bridging the gap between mind and matter.  Jung’s theory of synchronicity posited that certain events-often called coincidences-actually reveal the operation of an acausal connection between mental and physical events through meaning. Jung’s paradigmatic example of a synchronicity occurred during a therapy session.


In this session, his patient was in the midst of relating an intense dream she had had in which someone gave her a piece of gold jewelry in the shape of a scarab beetle. As she related the dream, Jung heard a tapping sound on the office window, which was caused by a very large insect flying repeatedly against the glass. He opened the window, and in flew a small goldish-green colored scarabeid beetle. The connection between the woman telling the dream and the appearance of the actual beetle is non-causal – the inner dream experience did not.... (click title to read entire post)

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Extracts from The Power of Myth with Joseph Campbell and Bill Moyers

Extracts from The Power of Myth with Joseph Campbell and Bill Moyers | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Nobody on their deathbed says "I wish I'd spent more time at the office." Take off your masks. Live, the time is now.

 

MOYERS: But aren’t many visionaries and even leaders and heroes close to the edge of neuroticism?

CAMPBELL: Yes, they are. Tête à Tête

MOYERS: How do you explain that?

CAMPBELL: They’ve moved out of the society that would have protected them, and into the dark forest, into the world of fire, of original experience. Original experience has not been interpreted for you, and so you’ve got to work out your life for yourself. Either you can take it or you can’t. You don’t have to go far off the interpreted path to find yourself in very difficult situations. The courage to face the trials and to bring a whole new body of possibilities into the field of interpreted experience for other people to experience – that is the hero’s deed.

CAMPBELL: The reference of the metaphor in religious traditions is to something transcendent that is not literally any thing. If you think that the metaphor is itself the reference, it would be like going to a restaurant, asking for the menu, seeing beefsteak written there, and starting to eat the menu.... (Click title for more)

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Jung’s model of the psyche - Ann Hopwood

Jung’s model of the psyche - Ann Hopwood | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung writes: ‘By psyche I understand the totality of all psychic processes, conscious as well as unconscious’, (CW6 para 797) so we use the term ‘psyche’ rather than ‘mind’, since mind is used in common parlance to refer to the aspects of mental functioning which are conscious. Jung maintained that the psyche is a self-regulating system (like the body).

 

The psyche strives to maintain a balance between opposing qualities while at the same time actively seeking its own development or as he called it, individuation. For Jung, the psyche is inherently separable into component parts with complexes and archetypal contents personified and functioning autonomously as complete secondary selves, not just as drives and processes. It is important to think of Jung’s model as a metaphor... (Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, April 9, 10:40 PM

A little more on  Jung's model of "Psyche"  ]

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The Ecology of Magic - An Interview with David Abram

The Ecology of Magic - An Interview with David Abram | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Performing magic is not simply about entertaining, David points out in this interview. "The task of the magician is to startle our senses and free us from outmoded ways of thinking." The magician also plays an important ecological function, he says, by mediating between the human world and the "more-than-human" world that we inhabit.

Abram: I had learned my craft from American magicians and from books and had thought of magic as a craft that originates as a form of entertainment. But it turned out that it was the oldest craft there is. Sleight-of-hand itself has its origins in the work of the shaman or sorcerer in altering perception and the organization of the senses.

London: Do medicine people ever practice sleight-of-hand magic?

Abram: Well, we've all heard of psychic surgeons, these folks who use a certain style of what we could call magic. In the Philippines, for example, they extract illness from a person's body by passing their hand over it and making a kind of invisible incision. Then they reach into the body and draw out some... (Click title for more)

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Carl Jung on Death

Carl Jung on Death | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

“We are so convinced that death is simply the end of a process that it does not ordinarily occur to us to conceive of death as a goal and a fulfillment.”

“It would seem to be more in accord with the collective psyche of humanity to regard death as the fulfillment of life’s meaning and as its goal in the truest sense, instead of a meaningless cessation.”

“Death is the hardest thing from the outside and as long as we are outside of it. But once inside you taste of such completeness and peace and fulfillment that you don’t want to return.”

“…death appears as a joyful event. In light of eternity, it is a wedding…The soul attains, as it were, its missing half, it achieves wholeness.... (Click title to read more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, March 27, 10:46 PM

In the end lies the beginning....

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Archetype - Definition and Examples

Archetype - Definition and Examples | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In literature, an archetype is a typical character, an action or a situation that seems to represent such universal patterns of human nature.

An archetype, also known as universal symbol, may be a character, a theme, a symbol or even a setting. Many literary critics are of the opinion that archetypes, which have a common and recurring representation in a particular human culture or entire human race, shape the structure and function of a literary work.

Carl Jung, Swiss psychologist, argued that the root of an archetype is in the “collective unconscious” of mankind. The phrase “collective unconscious” refers to experiences shared by a race or culture. This includes love, religion, death, birth, life, struggle, survival etc. These experiences exist in the subconscious of every individual and are recreated in literary works or in other forms of art. (Click title for more)

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Michael Goodman's curator insight, March 29, 7:09 AM

Via Bonnie Bright...thank you! And thank you for the vast resource of wisdom and knowledge from the Jungian community and beyond that you continue to share so generously.

 

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Sophia: Gnostic Archetype of Feminine Wisdom

Sophia: Gnostic Archetype of Feminine Wisdom | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The Gnostics recognized the condition of exile as more than an event in history.  They saw it as having a profound cosmic and even transcosmic dimension.  The human spirit, they held, is quite literally a stranger in a strange land.  "Sometimes I feel like a motherless child," laments the American spiritual.  The Gnostics would have agreed and might have been tempted to replace "sometimes" with "always".


The exile may indeed find himself in a dark land, but his very awareness of the darkness can also reveal a light on the path to freedom.  So also, the awareness of our alieness and recognition of our place of exile for what it is are the first great steps on the path of return.  We begin to rise as soon as we realize that we have fallen.
The predicament of exile and alienation is not confined to humanity nor does it originate at the human level.  Long before there was a cosmos as we know it, a great drama of exile and return was played out in the story of the divine feminine being named Sophia.  Having resided in the lofty height of eternal Fullness... (Click title to read full article)


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Bonnie Bright's comment, February 11, 12:39 AM
Truly excellent telling of the story...I really understood Sophia and gnosticism on a new level by reading this!
Eva Rider's curator insight, February 28, 8:55 PM

A History of Sophia

Kati Sarvela's curator insight, March 9, 8:50 AM

My Inner Wisdom was called Sophia in my self-reflective journaling process :D!

 

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Jung's Theory of Dreams

Jung's Theory of Dreams | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Why do we have dreams? Where do they originate? Do they have meaning? Are dreams of any value to us, or are they just so much nonsense? These questions have puzzled thinkers since the dawn of humanity. Every culture in the world has offered explanations. For instance, the Australian Aborigines believe that what we consider the realm of dreams is the real world (the Dreamtime), and the world we experience with our senses is a dream.

 

C.G. Jung put forth a theory of dreams which is quite popular today. Following in the footsteps of Sigmund Freud, Jung claimed that dream analysis is the primary way to gain knowledge of the unconscious mind. He says that the dream is a natural phenomenon which we can study, thereby gaining knowledge of the hidden part of our mind.... (Click here for more....)

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Ike Cerrada's curator insight, February 3, 12:15 PM

The fabulous world of dreams...

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Waking Up with the House on Fire: A conversation with psychologist James Hillman-- about kids, shrinks, mythology, and death

Waking Up with the House on Fire: A conversation with psychologist James Hillman-- about kids, shrinks, mythology, and death | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

(From 1996) --There's no easy way to sum up what Hillman, grounding himself in Jung, calls "archetypal psychology," but one can start by noting that nearly all the current interest in "soul" as an aspect of everyday life is influenced by Hillman; and Hillman's notion of soul is steeped in mythology and aesthetics and mysticism.

 

His psychology, as he puts it in The Thought of the Heart and the Soul of the World, requires "radical shifts of orientation, so that we can value soul before mind, image before feeling, each before all, aesthesis and imagining before logos and conceiving, noticing before knowing, rhetoric before truth, animal before human...(Click title for more)

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