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Jung, Synchronicity, And Human Destiny

Jung, Synchronicity, And Human Destiny | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Synchronicity refers to the underlying cosmic intelligence that synchronizes people, places and events into a meaningful order. We experience synchronicity when an outer event corresponds to our inner thoughts, perceptions or feelings. - Law of Time

 

Carl Jung is the Swiss psychologist and psychiatrist that founded “analytical psychology,” as well as the extravert and introvert psychological types.

 

Analytical psychology focuses on the whole of the human being, believing that the unconscious mind is the primary source for healing and is vital to the development of an individual’s soul. Unlike many psychologists and scientists, Jung believed the world of dreams, myth, and folklore, should be...(click title for more)

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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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Depth Insights » Jung in the Garden of Eden: A Myth of the Transformation of Consciousness by Arthur George, J.D

Depth Insights » Jung in the Garden of Eden: A Myth of the Transformation of Consciousness by Arthur George, J.D | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The biblical story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden (Genesis Chapters 2-3) is foundational to our Western culture and has influenced the upbringing and psychology of all of us, whether we realize it or not. Mythologists as well as many biblical scholars recognize the story as being in the genre of myth, which makes it appropriate to analyze it from the perspective of depth psychology, among other approaches.


Indeed, as Joseph Campbell concluded, “This story yields its meaning only to a psychological interpretation” (2001, p. 50). Further, Carl Jung (CW 9.2, para. 230) had already written that “cosmogonic myths are, at bottom, symbols for the coming of consciousness.” But the literature about the Eden story taking such a psychological approach is scant, largely due to traditional and problematic gaps and tensions between academic disciplines....


. - See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/jung-in-the-garden-of-eden-a-myth-of-the-transformation-of-consciousness-arthur-george-j-d/#sthash.nvkjfuuH.dpuf

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Depth Insights » "Wotan in the Shadows: Analytical Psychology and the Archetypal Roots of War" by Ritske Rensma

Depth Insights » "Wotan in the Shadows: Analytical Psychology and the Archetypal Roots of War" by Ritske Rensma | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung lived in a time of crisis. He was confronted with the atrocities of two world wars, spent his final years in the climate of the cold war, and was hugely concerned about mankind’s inability to find solutions to the recurring occurrences of mass conflict he was forced to witness in his lifetime. It should come as no surprise, then, that Jung wrote extensively about the possible causes of war and conflict. A central notion which he defended throughout his career was that the roots of war are to be found in the human psyche, in what he called our “war-like instincts,” which we will never be able to eradicate:


"Anything that disappears from your psychological inventory is apt to turn up in the guise of a hostile neighbor, who will inevitably arouse your anger and make you aggressive. It is surely better to know that your worst enemy is right there in your own heart. Man‘s war-like instincts are ineradicable – therefore a state of perfect peace is unthinkable..."


- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/wotan-in-the-shadows-analytical-psychology-and-the-archetypal-roots-of-war-by-dr-ritske-rensma/#sthash.kSBbesZw.dpuf

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On wounding... from Rumi

On wounding... from Rumi | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"The wound is the place where the light enters you"~ Rumi

http://depthpsychologylist.com/Rumi-wound-is-where-light-enters

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Jung on Active Imagination: Key readings selected by Joan Chodorow

Jung on Active Imagination: Key readings selected by Joan Chodorow | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Book review by Tasha Tollman

 

Joan Chodorow, dance therapist, analyst and analyst member of the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco combed through volumes of Jung’s writings and lectures to bring us this collection of Jung’s writings on Active Imagination. Fascinating for me was the insight into the many different names Jung used for this process – transcendent function, picture method, active fantasy, active phantasying, trancing, visioning, exercises, dialectical method, technique of differentiation, technique of introversion, introspection and technique of the descent – before settling on the term Active Imagination.


Chodorow introduces the topic, beginning with Jung’s ‘Confrontation with the Unconscious’, following his break with Freud in 1912/1913.  During this period Jung entered a period of disorientation and intense inner turmoil: 

“He suffered from lethargy and fears; his moods threatened to overwhelm him.  He had to find a way, a method to heal himself from within. Since he didn’t know what to do, he decided to engage with the impulses and images of the unconscious.” (p.1)...(Click title for more....)


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Depth Insights » The Coming Storm: Prophetic Dreams and the Climate Crisis by Paco Mitchell

Depth Insights » The Coming Storm: Prophetic Dreams and the Climate Crisis by Paco Mitchell | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

All dreams are laden with anticipatory clues about emerging trends; but a prophetic dream gazes, as it were, past the individual dreamer, to focus upon emergent motifs that confront the entire culture, society or even civilization. This collective, anticipatory potency imparts to prophetic dreams much of their enhanced value. That, plus the enlivening archetypal energies of their images and dramatics.

 

A prophetic dream enables us to see not just further ahead, in a horizontal, secular sense, but also deeper—into the emergent psycho-spiritual motifs that confront the entire culture, society or even civilization. Such dreams offer a better way for us to form attitudes toward the future than just relying on ego-habits alone. In creating the future, the transpersonal agencies within and behind dreams can help us break up our old assumptions and melt them down to be re-cast in new forms.

- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/the-coming-storm-prophetic-dreams-and-the-climate-crisis-by-paco-mitchell/#sthash.UAF7rmaO.dpuf

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Eva Rider's curator insight, November 9, 4:41 PM

Dreams from the collective...by Paco Mitchell

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You Are Not a Stranger Here - Alan Watts

You Are Not a Stranger Here - Alan Watts | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"You didn't come into this world. You came out of it, like a wave from the ocean. 
 You are not a stranger here." ~Alan Watts

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In Honor of Halloween...Day of the Dead...Dia de los Muertos: A Journey Into Jung

In Honor of Halloween...Day of the Dead...Dia de los Muertos:  A Journey Into Jung | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Ghosts and spirits have haunted the Western psyche since its beginning. Jung's writings demonstrate that Greek, Roman, Medieval, and Renaissance literature and theology are rich in examples of the ambivalent roles spirits of the dead have played in human experience. The same theme emerges throughout human history: the living struggle to make peace with the dead. In the words of Robert Romanyshyn, Ph.D. (2002), "the dead who haunt our dreams in search of release are like the ghosts who haunt our symptoms in search of their stories."

What is the significance of this realm between the living and the dead and why are the dead so intent upon getting our attention?

David Miller (2004) spoke to this in his book Hells and Holy Ghosts. According to Miller the "Holy Ghost" was systematically mistranslated in the King James Version of the Bible in order to reduce the number of references to ghosts. (Click here for full article)

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Vampire, The Archetype

Vampire, The Archetype | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The vampire myth has appeared over the centuries in almost every culture, beginning with the earliest recorded epic from Babylonia, about 2000 years B.C. Although there are cultural variations in the various legends, there is always one defining trait of a vampire: a vampire sucks blood. It consumes another to sustain it's own life.

 

Blood stands for life, and blood is also the archetypal symbol of the soul (life energy) . Therefore blood is a central symbol in many religions, including the Christian. The central image of all vampire lore is blood.

The image of the vampire is dark. Like an insatiable void, vampires consume another person and suck away their life energy. The vampire story has been a prime carrier of horror, but a remarkable aspect of this horror is the vampire's lack of violence, and except for some of Hollywood's versions, commonly a lack of overt sex... (Click title for more)

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The Perils of the Unlived Life

The Perils of the Unlived Life | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
The unlived life--those potentials not realized, those dreams not pursued--has a powerful negative impact. How can we find our way back to a life of meaning?

 

One of the most potent forces upon the psyche of the individual, according to C.G. Jung, is the unlived life of one’s parents. By this he means the potentials of the parents that have remained unrealized and the personal qualities that have never been developed or expressed. 

Jung, however, is not speaking of those things that have been attempted and missed, but rather those things that were never even chanced:

“that part of their lives which might have been lived had not certain threadbare excuses prevented the parents from ever doing so.”... (Click title for more)

Bonnie Bright's insight:

Excellent article on an important topic that affects all of us, whether we are living our vocation or not (yet).

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Eva Rider's curator insight, October 21, 12:38 PM

finding meaning in our lives is a uniquely human mandate. If we ignore the call, we miss finding not only fulfillment but our very Selves.

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Jung, Individuation, and Shamanism

Jung, Individuation, and Shamanism | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
According to historian and philosopher Mircea Eliade, shamanism has been around for millennia, practically as long as humans have existed. In recent decades, the archetype of shamanism has experienced a rebirth. With growing consciousness, more and more individuals are recognizing spontaneously and consistently what our indigenous ancestors knew: that there is a divine intelligence at work in the universe, a life force of love andlight, of which, by nature and birthright, we are an integral part. 
Anne Baring (2007), psychologist and author, notes that C.G. Jung himself commented on the capacity of humans to respond to this greater force, saying:
The archetypal image of the wise man, the saviour or redeemer, lies buried and dormant in man's unconscious since the dawn of culture; it is awakened whenever the times are out of joint and a human society is committed to a serious error...These primordial images are … called into being by the waywardness of the general outlook. When conscious life is characterised by one-sidedness and by a false attitude, they are activated…"instinctively" … in the dreams of individuals and the visions of artists and seers... (Click title for more)
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The unconscious arises ~ C. G. Jung

The unconscious arises ~ C. G. Jung | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"Just as conscious contents can vanish into the unconscious,
new contents, which have never yet been conscious, can arise from it."
~ C.G. Jung, Man and His Symbols  

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Jung and The Undiscovered Self

Jung and The Undiscovered Self | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
 In 1957, Carl Jung wrote an essay titled The Undiscovered Self which addresses “the plight of the individual in modern society.” It is a powerful and important work that, in many ways, incorporates and outlines many of the main insights of his whole life’s work.

The heart of Jung’s thesis is that the dignity of the individual and, consequently, his or her capacity to experience meaning in life, are becoming buried in what he calls “mass-mindedness.”

The most obvious example of this mass-mindedness was the rise of the totalitarian states, which, at the time Jung was writing, had many people concerned that they would spread across the whole... (Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, October 21, 12:42 PM

finding meaning in the 21st centurey

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Depth Insights » American Cerberus: Meditations on Pit Bulls and the Underworld by Elizabeth Selena Zinda

Depth Insights » American Cerberus: Meditations on Pit Bulls and the Underworld by Elizabeth Selena Zinda | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Admired by some as strong and loyal, vilified by others as vicious killers, and cherished by many as sweet family members, pit bull type dogs inhabit extreme and contradicting places in the American imagination. For decades public debate has raged over the nature of pit bulls and their rightful place in communities (“pit bull” is not the name of a specific breed but rather refers to few breeds and mixes, notably the American Pit Bull Terrier and American Staffordshire Terrier).

 

Since pit bulls began to be imagined as inherently dangerous in the 1980s they have been the subjects of wave after wave of negative media representation. Municipalities across the country implemented breed-based regulations and bans, resulting in countless dogs being surrendered to shelters or seized and euthanized. In recent years rescue and advocacy efforts emerged in response, with a shift toward positive representation and public education to debunk myths and...


- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/american-cerberus-meditations-on-pit-bulls-and-the-underworld-by-elizabeth-selena-zinda/#sthash.N841ysd1.dpuf

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Depth Insights » "Artemis without Arrows: Aggression Lost and Found" by Betsy Hall

Depth Insights » "Artemis without Arrows: Aggression Lost and Found" by Betsy Hall | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Contemporary American stereotypes, resulting from fixed and rigid typologies, reveal cultural beliefs and psychological truth. Evolving out of a faulty understanding of hunting and farming mythologies, and patriarchal and feminist assertions, one such stereotype is the belief that by nature men, and not women, are hunters.

 

By extension, the binary fantasy that men are aggressive and women are nurturers is a testimonial to the lost archetype of woman as hunter within our everyday life. Denial of feminine aggression has rendered Artemis, a feminine archetype of the Hunt, to an unconscious and split-off position—she has been stripped of her arrows. Drawing upon my own life and with a specific focus on women’s experience, this article examines both the psychological consequences of the lost archetype and the transformation offered by a present day practice that facilitates a conscious re-integration of aggressive instincts.

According to Depth psychology, myths are timeless and eternal stories that contain and reveal essential patterns, and archetypal instincts, that underlie all human experience. The ancient Greek myth of Artemis... (click title for more)

 

Photo credit: Copyright http://www.123rf.com/profile_malchev

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Kathy Mays's curator insight, November 20, 4:48 AM

great article!

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Depth Insights » Frontispiece for Liber Novus: Biblical Texts on Folio Page One of the Red Book by Gerald F. Kegler

Depth Insights » Frontispiece for Liber Novus: Biblical Texts on Folio Page One of the Red Book by Gerald F. Kegler | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

C.G. Jung opens his Liber Novus (The Red Book) with several elements: an elaborately painted initial, “Der Weg des Kommenden” (The Way That is to Come), three calligraphic script passages in Latin from the biblical book of Isaiah, and one from the Gospel According to John.


This material fills the entire first page and closes in Latin with, “Written by C.G. Jung with his own hand in his house in Kusnach/Zurich in the year 1915” (Jung, 2009, folio p. 1). Shamdasani (2012) places Jung’s Red Book in the tradition of William Blake’s illuminated printing.


Jung combined poetic word and artistic imagery in the creation of the Liber Novus. Like the frontispiece of Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, we may appropriately characterize this first folio page as the frontispiece for Liber Primus and the whole Liber Novus.


- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/frontispiece-for-liber-novus-biblical-texts-on-folio-page-one-of-the-red-book-bygerald-f-kegler/#sthash.REmvJ9ZB.dpuf

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Depth Insights » God as Intimate Soul by Paul DeBlassie III, Ph.D.

Depth Insights » God as Intimate Soul by Paul DeBlassie III, Ph.D. | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The idea of practical spirituality emerged out of an alchemical mix of William James and Carl Jung, and their respective psychic perspectives on the soul. As a clinical psychologist in private practice for the past 30 years specializing in depth psychology and psychology and spirituality, I have treated scores of individuals in the midst of making their way across the dark and troubled waters of the unconscious mind.

 

Serving as therapist and guide, a Hermetic dynamic at work within the treatment relationship, we frequently witness the emergence of a natural and immensely practical spirituality that nourishes the soul. It is of course, a vital relationship with the Self that supplants old, outer, religiosity.

 

In developing this relationship, William James (2006, p. 24) hit upon a revolutionary idea: God as intimate soul. Transformative numinous experience is nourished as we cultivate intimacies with soul

 

- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/god-as-intimate-soul-by-paul-deblassie-iii-ph-d/#sthash.EksLVyak.dpuf

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Depth Insights » Traveling the Royal Road: A Personal Encounter With the Word Association Test By Drew H. Smith

Depth Insights » Traveling the Royal Road: A Personal Encounter With the Word Association Test By Drew H. Smith | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In his lectures at the Tavistock Clinic, C. G. Jung (1968) addressed an eager and engaged audience with his exciting application of word association tests. While explaining the simple procedure of speaking a word to a patient, recording their reply word, and timing the space that hangs in between the two, he says something quite profound. He talks of the original intent of this “test”—it was meant to study mental associations—and explained this proved to be too idealistic.


But what could be studied, however, were the mistakes. Jung said, “You ask a simple word that a child can answer, and a highly intelligent person cannot reply. Why? That word has hit on what I call a complex” (p. 53). Complexes, as defined by Jung...(Click title for more)

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Depth Insights » Mythology of Animals by Joseph P. Muszynski, Ph.D

Depth Insights » Mythology of Animals by Joseph P. Muszynski, Ph.D | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The possibility exists that animals may have their own myths. Evolutionary biology tells us that non-human and human animals are biologically related, including similarities in brain function. Both see images. Depth psychology is rich in discussion of how we create myth from images. This opens the possibility that animals can also do so.

 

Many questions arise. Are images all that are needed to “know” myth? If the archetypal images we see are related to instincts, would such images really be a uniquely human phenomenon? If other animals do have these archetypal, instinctual images within them, are they enough to lead to myths? The question of whether non-human animals are aware and conscious would be an a priori condition to believe this to be possible. Or, do we need speech for myth?

 

A myth may only be a myth if it is told, somehow shared with others. We do know other animals communicate, both with each other and with us to the degree that we are receptive, but are they capable of sharing myths? (Click title for more....)

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Aladin Fazel's curator insight, November 6, 2:44 PM

The answer might be Yes, who knows! 

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Psychology is Mythology Hillman

Psychology is Mythology Hillman | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
“Psychology is ultimately mythology, the study of the stories of the soul”
~James Hillman in The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, p. 576 
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Halloween Special: C. G. Jung’s Spine-Chilling Nights in a ‘Haunted House’

Halloween Special: C. G. Jung’s Spine-Chilling Nights in a ‘Haunted House’ | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The following excerpts are from a report originally contributed by Carl Gustav Jung to Spuk. Irrglaube oder Wahrglaube? (chapter 5, Baden: Gyr, 1950), a study of hauntings and poltergeist cases by the zoologist Fanny Moser (1872-1953). The below is extracted from C. G. Jung, Psychology and the Occult(London: Routledge, 1982, pp. 174-183; I’m grateful to Sonu Shamdasani for informing me of the existence of an English translation) and can be read as a footnote to my previous post on the malleability of interpretations of ‘poltergeist’ phenomena. Jung’s report is unusual in so far that other published cases tend to be more dramatic – but far less scary!

 

Jung writes that in the summer of 1920 he was invited by a colleague (whose identity he protects by calling him ‘Dr. X.’) to give lectures in England. In expectation of Jung’s visit, ‘Dr. X.’ had found a suitable place for the weekends, “a charming cottage” in Buckinghamshire, at “a ridiculously low price”. After giving detailed information about the layout of the house and his room, Jung reports:

 

The first night... (click here for full article)

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Cave Paintings Dating to 6000 Years Ago Depict Otherworldly Beings and a Permeable, Layered Cosmological Map

Scattered across the Cumberland Plateau, a portion of the Appalachian Mountains, are drawings created by pre-historic people depicting possible shamanic journeys into other realms. One 14th century cave painting found in Tennessee, for example, illustrates a standing bird with arms and hands grasping ceremonial weapons with blades and axes coming from its face.


 

Other beings are depicted with less aggressive postures. “The art sites, predominantly found in caves, feature otherworldly characters, supernatural serpents and dogs that accompanied dead humans on the path of souls,” the archaeologists tell us. The images of the ‘lower world’ are also principally painted in black, a color associated with death. Many of these images may correspond to Tibetan depictions of the afterlife, called bardo. Death is not seen as a final destination by this culture, but an important opportunity for spiritual development.

 

 

The lower world was depicted by darkness and peril and was associated with death, transformation and renewal. The inclusion of creatures such as... (click title for more)


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Patterns and Jungian Depth Psychology

Patterns and Jungian Depth Psychology | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"The reason Jung says anima/animus is the most difficult piece you are going to come into on your journey to self is because it is so foreign and so remote from how we ordinarily conduct our lives that we can’t see it operating. We’re looking at one reality. It reminds me of a microscope where you are seeing one reality and then you fix on something else and “oh here’s another reality” as you move it up and down.  So the anima in this reference is constantly operating.  She constantly weaves all of the information both seen and unseen and transforms it into appearances.  And, interestingly, she is so good at the variations that 28 people watching an event in a room are experiencing it differently. Not one is experiencing the same reality.  She weaves it in infinite variation.

 

I am mentioning these patterns because they are part of what is called the eternal and the deeper you go in your journey and the more you can pick up a pattern and recognize pattern, you have access to not only time/space, by time/space I’m talking about doing jumps of time, because patterns are not in time and space as we know it.  They are operating through it.

 

This is why I keep emphasizing dream work, being able to read pattern.  To read the pattern that you are moving through at this time is to see an eternal pattern emanating in your life about which you have absolutely nothing to say.  So it is best to put yourself into accord.  It serves a larger mystery.

 

Life’s energy is not devoted to the ego.  It’s devoted and serves your soul.  It doesn’t matter which pattern you discover you are operating in, you always want to catch a glimpse.  It is one tree in the forest of your own interior.  And it always has its complement.  The abandoner is in love with the abandoned.  When it is taken all the way over to an extreme, it is very hard to see the other side.  In fact most of us operate in the extremes of one-sidedness and cast out the other part, which is called projection.  We cast out the unseen part onto everyone or everything else.  It can’t be me.  You’re wrong. 

 

As you move more and more into the awareness of the heart center, it is way beyond the personal.  You really do catch the suchness of things.  It’s not being viewed through biases and preferences.  It’s being viewed through suchness and this is what gives you the ability to not only see clearly but it gives you the ability to respond clearly"...W.Brugh Joy, MD


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Michael Goodman's curator insight, September 13, 2:26 PM

Via Patricia D...thank you

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Working with Dreams: Depth Psychology Techniques of Carl Gustav Jung and James Hillman

Working with Dreams: Depth Psychology Techniques of Carl Gustav Jung and James Hillman | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Dream work is ancient, it’s long tradition evidenced in the temples of Asclepius in Greece where individuals went to be healed through their dreams. Dreams have been an important aspect of many spiritual traditions, and even Freud considered the study of dreams to be his most important work. There are many methods of dream analysis. When working with dreams, it can be helpful to intentionally assess them from various aspects, including mythical, archetypal, alchemical, and collective, and to pay attention to which resonate most strongly emotionally and elicit even a physical response in order to begin to understand what insights are being gifted through your unconscious.

 

In The Dream and the Underworld, James Hillman prefers to allow the dream and dream symbols to remain what they are, and not to analyze and interpret them but to simply interact with them and see what comes about. However, Hillman’s method of seeing focuses far more on an artistic view than from a therapeutic or results-oriented standpoint. As such, when it comes to dreams and symbols, he stays... (click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, October 21, 12:48 PM

Dreams: Jung and Hillman

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Holotropic Breathwork: New Perspectives in Psychotherapy and Self-Exploration (Stan Grof)

Holotropic Breathwork: New Perspectives in Psychotherapy and Self-Exploration  (Stan Grof) | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In the last few decades, Western therapists have rediscovered the healing potential of breath and developed techniques that utilize it. Deliberate increase of the pace of breathing  typically loosens psychological defenses and leads to a release and
emergence of unconscious (and superconscious) material.

 

The extraordinary healing power of holotropic states — which  ancient and native cultures used for centuries or even millennia in their ritual, spiritual, and healing practices — was confirmed by modern consciousness research conducted in the second half of the twentieth century. This research has also shown that the phenomena occurring during these states and associated with them represent a critical challenge for current conceptual frameworks used by academic psychiatry and psychology and for their basic metaphysical assumptions. The work with Holotropic Breathwork thus requires a new understanding of consciousness and of the human psyche in health and disease. The basic principles of this new psychology were discussed in another context (Grof 2000, 2007). (Click title for more)

 
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Laura Smith's curator insight, October 15, 9:46 PM

Wonderfully illustrated piece on holotropic breathwork as a psycho-spiritual healing practice...piques my curiosity to bring this into my work with dreams, specifically focusing on trauma as opened by the dream and where it's held in the body.