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Jung, Synchronicity, And Human Destiny

Jung, Synchronicity, And Human Destiny | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Synchronicity refers to the underlying cosmic intelligence that synchronizes people, places and events into a meaningful order. We experience synchronicity when an outer event corresponds to our inner thoughts, perceptions or feelings. - Law of Time

 

Carl Jung is the Swiss psychologist and psychiatrist that founded “analytical psychology,” as well as the extravert and introvert psychological types.

 

Analytical psychology focuses on the whole of the human being, believing that the unconscious mind is the primary source for healing and is vital to the development of an individual’s soul. Unlike many psychologists and scientists, Jung believed the world of dreams, myth, and folklore, should be...(click title for more)

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via Maxwell Purrington

Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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Carl Jung & the UFO Phenomenon

Carl Jung & the UFO Phenomenon | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

While Jung is known mainly for his theories on the nature of the unconscious mind, he did have an interest in the paranormal. In his books 'Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies', Jung applies his analytical skills to the UFO phenomenon. Rather than assuming that the modern prevalence of UFO sightings are due to extraterrestrial craft, Jung reserves judgment on their origin and connects UFOs with archetypal imagery, concluding that they have become a "living myth."

 

Jung's primary concern in Flying Saucers is not with the reality or unreality of UFOs but with their psychic aspect. Rather than speculate about their possible nature and extraterrestrial origin as alleged spacecraft, he asks what it may signify that these phenomena, whether real or imagined, are seen in such numbers just at a time when humankind is menaced as never before in history. The UFOs represent, in Jung's phrase, "a modern myth."... (Clik title for more)

 

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Liminality, Thresholds, and the Symbolic Landscape ~ Betsy Perluss PhD

Liminality, Thresholds, and the Symbolic Landscape ~ Betsy Perluss PhD | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

One of the greatest deceptions of modern culture is that there is no direct relationship between the external realm of matter and the realm of psyche. The lie continues to promote the notion that while the concrete realm is “objective”, clean and clear-cut, and rational, the realm of psyche, the dream realm, is “subjective”, vague, fuzzy, irrational, and thus, not worth serious attention.


Furthermore, through our scientific understanding of the world, which values the “objective” over the “subjective”, we have demythologized the natural world, extracting from it any symbolic meaning, having sent this back into the unconscious. The result, as Carl Jung states, is a world that has been emptied of soul and a human consciousness that stands aloof from creation, further promoting what Jung calls, “The Cult of Consciousness”.


Through scientific understanding, our world has become dehumanized. Man feels himself isolated in the cosmos. He is no longer involved in nature and has lost his emotional participation in natural events, which hitherto had a symbolic meaning for him. Thunder is no longer the voice of a god, nor is lightening his avenging missile. No river contains a spirit, no tree means... (Click title for more)

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Personal Myths Bring Cohesion to the Chaos of Each Life

Personal Myths Bring Cohesion to the Chaos of Each Life | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

THE ancient myths are not dead; they live on in the stories people tell about their own lives.

While the old gods do not show up by name, they are there in spirit, in the struggles and triumphs that people depict as the key episodes in their lives.

New work by psychological researchers shows that in telling their life stories, people invent a personal myth, a tale that, like the myths of old, explains the meaning and goals of their lives. In doing so, they match - quite unwittingly - the characters and themes that are found in the old myths.

For example, one research subject, Tom H., depicted his life story as a saga in which he was a warrior like the Greek god Ares. Tom found himself in constant battle -with other children, relatives and people in authority. The main struggle of his life... (Click title to keep reading)

(Image by Nathaniel Bearson.)

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A Brief Introduction to C. G. Jung and Analytical Psychology

A Brief Introduction to C. G. Jung and Analytical Psychology | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Carl Gustav Jung was the best known member of the group that formed the core of the early psychoanalytic movement—followers and students of Sigmund Freud. After completing his medical studies, Jung obtained a position at the Burghoelzli Hospital in Zurich, Switzerland. There he worked with patients suffering from schizophrenia, while also conducting word association research.


In 1904 Jung corresponded with Freud about this latter work and also began to use Freud's psychoanalytic treatment with his patients. In 1906 Freud invited Jung to Vienna, and they began a professional relationship. Freud soon began to favor Jung as his successor in the new and growing psychoanalytic movement.


Through Freud's efforts, Jung was appointed Permanent President of the Association of Psycho-Analysis at its Second Congress in 1910. Jung and Freud held in common an understanding of the profound role of the unconscious. Their understanding of the nature of the unconscious, however, began to diverge. This led to a painful break between the two men... (Click title for more)

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Carol Sherriff's curator insight, August 8, 2:02 AM

Interesting introduction to Jung's work. For facilitators perhaps best known for developing archetypes that underpin facilitation tools such as Heroes' Journey (my preference to Hero's)

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Reversing Genesis: The Ransacking of Temple Earth ~ Craig Chalquist PhD

Reversing Genesis: The Ransacking of Temple Earth ~ Craig Chalquist PhD | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

If you were to enter a church, mosque, or synagogue determined to plunder it before burning it down, you would probably end up in custody. Do the same to Earth, temple and home to us all, and you might be eligible for a government subsidy. Isn't that strange?

 

When psychologists talk about splitting, they refer to the habit of keeping sectors of life that belong together divided into different compartments. The unhealed child abuse survivor grows up to forget that the parent who beat them savagely was the parent they now idealize as an exemplar of loving discipline. The producer of violent films forbids his children to watch them. The speed dater with a track record of ending up with exploitative men convinces herself, again, that this man is the one she's been waiting for. The troll who attends church on Sunday spends the rest of the week vilifying people online.

 

Splitting, an emotional defense of early childhood, has become a character disorder of American society. News networks whose politician guests pushed the disastrous war in Iraq but never landed in prison...(Click title for more)

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Carl G. Jung’s Synchronicity and Quantum Entanglement: Schrodinger’s Cat ‘Wanders’ Between Chromosomes

Carl G. Jung’s Synchronicity and Quantum Entanglement: Schrodinger’s Cat ‘Wanders’ Between Chromosomes | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
One of the most prospective directions of study of C.G. Jung’s synchronicity phenomenon is reviewed considering the latest achievements of modern science.

Via Pierre Paperon, Paola Spadaro
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Sarah Clarke's curator insight, August 2, 10:47 AM

I would relish it if synchronicity was proven to be a by product of quantum activity.  As a psych tested logic fiend I have never been able to shake the sense that there are links beneath the surface of days that peek through to shock or delight every now and then.

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Finding deeper meanings in the language of mental health

Finding deeper meanings in the language of mental health | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

A word is like a promise; a failure to deliver a kind of betrayal.  What does the language of mental health promise?


PSYCHOLOGY “study of the soul” (ψυχή, psukhē, meaning “breath”, “spirit”, or “soul”); and (-λογία -logia, translated as “study of” or “research”)

 

An essential part of the “scientific” training for young psychology/psychiatry/counseling grad students is a total denial of the spiritual (implicitly or explicitly, the message is that a true scientist must, by definition, be an atheist, and that faith is a foolish and primitive superstition).  You’d be hard pressed to find a mainstream mental health professional willing to call himself a “soul healer” or a “student of the soul” in English, though in Greek the claim is proudly printed on their business cards. .. (Click title for more)

 

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Across Cultures, Image Is Everything: ARAS

Across Cultures, Image Is Everything: ARAS | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
The Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism turns the human subconscious into a picture book.

 

Up a flight of quiet townhouse stairs, on a manic stretch of East 39th Street that includes, among other things, a stately cultural institute, a religious mission and a center for "foot health," hides the New York branch of a mysterious enterprise called ARAS, or the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism. It's hard to figure out exactly what goes on there, and even harder to explain once you know. But a lot of it owes to ARAS's namesake holdings: a collection of 17,000 "mythological, ritualistic and symbolic" images meant to catalog, more or less, the whole of our collective human unconscious.


"A 'symbol' points to something beyond just the thing in an image itself, beyond the knowledge that we have in our waking, conscious life," said ARAS curator Ami Ronnberg. "What we want to do is to go into an image and let the image speak on its own, to go into the deeper meaning of it."... (Click title for more)

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COMPENSATIONS FOR INADEQUACY

COMPENSATIONS FOR INADEQUACY | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

“How many of those who are insecure seek power over others as a compensation for inadequacy and wind up bringing consequences down upon their heads and those around them?


How many hide out in their lives, resist the summons to show up, or live fugitive lives, jealous, projecting onto others, and then wonder why nothing ever really feels quite right.


How many proffer compliance with the other, buying peace at the price of soul, and wind up with neither?”


― James Hollis, Ph. D., Hauntings


Via Michael Goodman, Eva Rider
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Planet Beehive—An eco-depth-psychological look at bees, philosophy, and culture

Planet Beehive—An eco-depth-psychological look at bees, philosophy, and culture | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
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Why the World Doesn't End - Michael Meade

Why the World Doesn't End - Michael Meade | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Fears of the end have been with us from the very beginning. Endings and beginnings are mythic moments par excellence; they depict the extremes of existence and are the bookends of creation. There are countless stories of how it all began, and tales of apocalyptic endings can be found in many cultures.

 

Humans are naturally myth-makers and storytellers. We find our way by "storying" the world around us. We turn everything into a news story or a dramatic tale that helps make sense of the ever-changing, often threatening events of the world. Whether it is a major storm, a horrifying massacre, a new scandal or the threat of war, we look for elements of the story that can help us understand what is happening to us.

 

To be alive at this time means to be exposed to great uncertainty and to feel the raw forces of nature as well as the rough edges and sharp divisions of culture. It is not simply that the air has become dangerously polluted and overheated, or that the political atmosphere is increasingly poisonous and destructive. We live amidst rapid changes, increasing fears and devastating tragedies. We suffer increasing extremes that include... (click title for more)

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Jungian Depth Psychology Quotes & Images

Jungian Depth Psychology Quotes & Images | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
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Lessons of Jung's Encounter with Native Americans

Lessons of Jung's Encounter with Native Americans | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1973) Jung described his encounter with Native Americans he met in New Mexico in 1925.  This event, though brief, had a profound effect on Jung, and he referred to it many times in his writings. He commented that his experience in New Mexico made him aware of his imprisonment "in the cultural consciousness of the white man" (Jung, 1973, p. 247).


At the Taos pueblo, Jung spoke for the first time with a non-white, a Hopi elder named Antonio Mirabal (also known as Ochwiay Biano and Mountain Lake), who said that whites were always uneasy and restless: "We do not understand them. We think that they are mad" (Jung, 1973, p. 248). Jung asked him why he thought the whites were mad, and the reply was " 'They say that they think with their heads . . . . We think here,' he said, indicating his heart" (p. 248).


Impressed, Jung said he realized that Mountain Lake had unveiled a significant truth about whites. To Jung the Indians he met appeared to be tranquil and dignified, which Jung attributed to their belief that (as Mountain Lake explained) through their religious practice, they helped the sun cross the sky every day. Jung believed this belief and practice served the function of making the Indians' ... (Click title for more)

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Carl Gustav Jung and Synchronicity, Archetypes, and the Collective Unconscious

Carl Gustav Jung and Synchronicity, Archetypes, and the Collective Unconscious | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung created the term synchronicity to describe the alignment of "universal forces"with the life experiences of an individual. Jung believed that many experiences perceived as coincidences were not merely due to chance, but instead reflected the creation of an event or circumstance by the "coinciding" or alignment of such forces. The process of becoming intuitively aware and acting in harmony with these forces is what Jung labeled "individuation". Jung said that an individuated person would actually shape events around them through the communication of their consciousness with the collective unconscious

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Jung coined the term “collective unconscious” to refer to that part of a person's unconscious which is common to all human beings, as opposed to personal unconscious, which is unique to each individual. According to Jung the collective unconscious contains archetypes, which are... (Click title for more)

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Jung: What Myth Do I Live By?

Jung: What Myth Do I Live By? | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung, working with the psychotics, had become pretty well acquainted with what might be called the archetypology of unconscious imagination.

He began reading books on comparative myth: Frobenius, Bastian, Frazer.

 

The realization came to him that the imagery that his patients were finding welling up from their own psyches was precisely that with which the world of comparative mythologies and their history of religion studies were already familiar. The imagery of his patients’ fantasizing showed precise parallels to mythological themes. Jung then noticed that the parallels held true not only with psychotics but with neurotics and with relatively well-balanced people as well.

 

This discovery impressed him tremendously and motivated him to immerse himself in the study of mythology. Symbols of Transformation, which deals with the interrelationship between dream consciousness and the mythological consciousness of visions...(Click title for more)

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Shamanism, Alchemy and Yoga: Traditional Technologies of Tranformation

Shamanism, Alchemy and Yoga: Traditional Technologies of Tranformation | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
From the most ancient times, human beings have practiced disciplines of psychospiritual transformation with devoted energy and intention. Modern systems of psychotherapy are the inheritors of three great traditions of transformation, in which the human is seen as engaged in purposive processes of exploration and integration in many realms of consciousness. In this essay I describe some of the common methods used, as well as the major metaphors for transformation.1

One possible definition of shamanism is that it is the disciplined approach to what has been variously called "non-ordinary reality", "the sacred", "the mystery", "the supernatural", "the inner world(s)", or "the otherworld".


Psychologically speaking, one could say these expressions refer to realms of consciousness that lie outside the boundaries of our usual and ordinary perception. The depth psychologies derived from psychoanalysis refer to such normally inaccessible realms as "the unconscious", or "the collective unconscious". This would, however, be too limiting a definition for shamanism, if "unconscious" is taken to refer to something within the individual, i.e. intrapsychic. Shamanic practice involves the exploration not only of unknown aspects of our own psyche, but also the unknown aspects of the world around us, - the external as well as internal mysteries.


There are three traditional systems of consciousness... (Click title for more)

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Carol Sherriff's curator insight, August 8, 2:04 AM

You don't usually get pscyhologists (or coaches and facilitators) admitting they draw on shamanism and alchemy, so this is refreshing reading.

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Terrapsychology: "The Environment" is You!

Terrapsychology: "The Environment" is You! | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Isn’t it odd that most of our psychologies treat the mind as entirely separate from the living world? That our standardized concepts of mental health make no reference to the health of our surroundings?

 

Scientific research makes it plain: the ecological health of the planet is not only a political or financial issue, but a mental health issue as well. Urban sprawl, air pollution, toxic waste, and sheer architectural ugliness have been shown to impact mental health.

 

Anxiety and depression, rage and crime, family violence, and lost productivity at work and at school do not exist in a vacuum. Health and hope fail when landfills and refineries go up in neighborhoods too poor to fight back. We suffer a global warming of collective consciousness, an eroded capacity for holding our fire.

 

However, the relationship between self and world runs much deeper than measurement can tell... (Click title for more)

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Laura Smith's curator insight, August 7, 5:09 PM

Such an important concept. The archetypes that comes in our dreams are often so deeply related to the earth, animals, plants, creativity and our own connectedness to the primal energy that is our planet.

Carol Sherriff's curator insight, August 8, 2:05 AM

I had not come across Terrapsychology before so a fascinating read with a slightly different take on how we are one with the world.

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Jung and Teilhard de Chardin

Jung and Teilhard de Chardin | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
 "Teilhard de Chardin and Carl Jung never met. Dr. Jung did finish reading The Phenomenon of Man less than a month before his death. The book had both a great and visible impact upon Dr. Jung according to Michael Serrano. It must have been satisfying for Dr. Jung to see Teilhard de Chardin from the perspective of a paleontologist and Jesuit Priest reach the same empirical conclusions about the evolution of consciousness that Dr. Jung found in his empirical research in Depth Psychology.
It is a peculiar oddity that both Teilhard de Chardin and Dr. Jung stressed the empirical nature of their work yet often find their books categorized under "Philosophy" and "New Age." This in itself justifies the importance of this great book as the recognition of consciousness and the reality of the inner world of the soul is far from recognized even at the dawn of the 21st century" ~Lewis Lafontaine   Carl Jung was reading Teilhard de Chardin during the last few days of his life. According to Miguel Serrano, when he visited Jung on May 10, 1961, "On the small table beside the chair where Jung was sitting, was a book called The Human Phenomenon by Teilhard de Chardin. I asked Jung whether he had read it. 'It is a great book,' he said. His face was pale, but seemed strangely illuminated by an inner light." (Miguel Serrano, C.G. Jung and Hermann Hesse: A Record of Two Friendships [New York: Schocken Books, 1968] pp. 100-101) Jung died on June 6, 1961.
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Jung and Pauli on I Ching

Scribd is the world's largest social reading and publishing site.

Via Maxwell Purrington, Paola Spadaro
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Quotes from “Memories, Dreams, and Reflections” by C.G. Jung

Quotes from “Memories, Dreams, and Reflections” by C.G. Jung | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

“The decisive question for a man is: is he related to something infinite or not? That is the telling question of his life. Only if we know that the thing which truly matters is the infinite can we avoid fixing our interest upon futilities, and upon all kinds of goals which are not of real importance. Thus we demand that the world grant us recognition for qualities we regard as personal possessions: our talent and our beauty.


The more a man lays stress on false possessions, and the less sensitivity he has for what is essential, the less satisfying is his life. He feels limited because he has limited aims, and the result is envy and jealousy. If we understand and feel that here in this life we already have a link with the infinite, desires and attitudes change. In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted.


In our relationships to other men, too, the crucial question is whether an element of boundlessness is expressed in the relationship.” (Click title for more)

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Image is Everything: Mythology, Hillman, and Jung

Image is Everything: Mythology, Hillman, and Jung | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Nothing could be more mistaken than to assume that a myth is something ‘thought up.’ It comes into existence of its own accord, as can be observed in all authentic products of fantasy, and particularly in dreams. It is the hybris of consciousness to pretend that everything derives from its primacy, despite the fact that consciousness itself demonstrably comes from an older unconscious psyche.” *

 

When Jung observes that “image is psyche,” (CW 13, §75), or James Hillman writes in this context that “According to Jung, the sine qua non of any consciousness whatsoever is the ‘psychic image,’” (Anima: An Anatomy 95), both men are not just saying that “image is everything” but also that “everything is image.” At any moment we are surrounded by language, images, and motifs created by the unconscious fantasy or myth-making mind (a.k.a. the “psyche” or soul) in its need to understand, make order out of, and create meaning for everyday existence... (Click title for more)

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Mother World: splitting, integration & evolution in the mother archetype

Mother World: splitting, integration & evolution in the mother archetype | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Carl Jung speaks of the human soul’s “longing to attain rebirth through a return to the womb, and to become immortal like the sun” (CW5, para. 312). In biblical terms rebirth is associated with entrance into Jerusalem. Jerusalem is the holy city, as image of the holy mother.

 

Jung says, “the Old Testament treats the cities of Jerusalem, Babylon, etc. just as if they were women” (para 303). While Jerusalem is an image of the holy mother, Babylon is the unholy mother. In Jung’s words: “Babylon is the symbol of the Terrible Mother” (Jung, para 315).

 

From a Kleinian perspective, the infant splits the mother image into two primitive forms: a ‘bad and persecuting’ form and a ‘loving and gratifying’ form. These two representations are internalized and become part of the psychic world.... (Click title for more)

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Mystical Emergence: An Architectural Journey Through Jung's Tower

Mystical Emergence: An Architectural Journey Through Jung's Tower | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Houses are where we begin and end each day. They shape our patterns of living and contain our relationships. We cook, eat, sleep, procreate, study, raise children, store our belongings, make our plans for the future, and interact with each other within them. They frame our view of the outside world, while providing privacy for our interior lives.


Paradoxically, they conceal our deepest secrets while transparently displaying our values, tastes, and social status through their form and style. Yet, despite the extremely personal role our houses play in our lives, few of us actually design or build them ourselves anymore. More often, like the resourceful hermit crab, we move into the best shells that we can find. We rely on the skills of architects, contractors, and interior designers to shape or remodel our homes to fit our personal tastes. The elusive goal of achieving the ideal home seduces us endlessly to fantasize a “dream house” where our lives are imagined as complete, in perfect harmony between a person and a place.


Magazines, newspapers and television run stories about them twenty-four hours a day. Home tours of the rich and famous satisfy our voyeuristic interest in seeing how others live. Recently, this hype and longing for gorgeous, seductive architecture has been referred to as “yuppie porn.” Yet, it is human nature to be interested in where and how other people live. This is especially true of such deeply personal places as Carl Jung’s private retreat at Bollingen... (Click title for more)

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Carol Sherriff's curator insight, August 8, 1:50 AM

Carl Jung has far reaching significance for interpreting our modern (and ancient) psyche. Ideas of safe space and voyeurism really useful for facilitators and coaches.

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Review: "A New Earth" by Eckhart Tolle

Beneath the surface, everything is connected with everything else and also connected to the Source of all life. When you first hold on to an object without naming it, you feel its essence, which is the same as your essence or Being.

 

When you do not cover the world with words, a miracle of newness and freshness is experienced by your essential self. One must disentangled oneself with all the forms that one has been mixed up with of so far. This disentanglement is what this book is all about. The faster one labels things the more intelligent one becomes, but the less wisdom one has.

 

The Illusion of self. The words “I”, “me”, “my” and “mine” are the most frequently used and also the most misleading. “I” embodies the primordial error, a misconception of who you are, an illusory sense of identity. This is the ego. This illusory sense of self is according to Albert Einstein “an optical illusion of consciousness.” That illusory self then becomes the basis for all further interpretations or rather misinterpretations of reality, all thought processes, interactions, and relationships ... (Click title for more)

 

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Dimitris Tsantaris's curator insight, July 14, 12:51 PM

Even if it flirts with commercialised/pop new-ageism, Tolle's "A New Earth" is a great book with very interesting and useful concepts.

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Quotes from C.G. Jung On The Shadow

Quotes from C.G. Jung On The Shadow | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Unfortunately there can be no doubt that man is, on the whole, less good than he imagines himself or wants to be. Everyone carries a shadow, and the less it is embodied in the individual's conscious life, the blacker and denser it is. If an inferiority is conscious, one always has a chance to correct it. Furthermore, it is constantly in contact with other interests, so that it is continually subjected to modifications. But if it is repressed and isolated from consciousness, it never gets corrected.
"Psychology and Religion" (1938). In CW 11: Psychology and Religion: West and East. P.131
"Taking it in its deepest sense, the shadow is the invisible saurian tail that man still drags behind him. Carefully amputated, it becomes the healing serpent of the mysteries. Only monkeys parade with it.The Integration of the Personality. (1939) (Click title for more)
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