Depth Psych
Follow
Find tag "synchronicity"
32.1K views | +3 today
Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
Curated by Bonnie Bright
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Jung and Synchronicity: The Union of Nature and Psyche

Jung and Synchronicity: The Union of Nature and Psyche | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

C.G. Jung determined that the psychological and physical features we perceive in the world are dual aspects of one underlying reality (Pauli et al., 2001). He came to view mind and matter as a continuum, with psyche located on one end and the physiological instinct on the other, and the archetype serving as the bridge between them (C. G. Jung, 1947/1985, p. 216), though he ultimately expressed a desire to do away with a theory of psychophysical parallelism altogether in lieu of a unitary reality known as the unus mundus, a union of spirit, soul and body (C. G. Jung, 1958/1978a, p. 452).

Pointing to ways in which inanimate objects seem to “collaborate” with the unconscious by forming symbolic patterns, Jung even cited instances where clocks stop at the moment of their owner’s passing, or where items break within a home where someone is going through a powerful emotional crisis. Click title to read more...

more...
Susan Scott's curator insight, May 7, 3:16 AM

I loved this - so insightful and broadening. Thank you.

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Understanding Synchronicities: Jungian Psychology

Understanding Synchronicities: Jungian Psychology | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Synchronicity is a concept developed by the Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung. It refers to a meaningful connection between events that are not causally related. More exactly, it describes a meaningful co-occurrence between an inner psychological state or process, and an outer event which parallels or reflects it. For example, if I am experiencing an inner conflict over a decision I must make and at the same time an argument breaks out between my neighbors in the apartment next door, that is a synchronicity. My inner conflict is symbolically reflected in the outer world, though the two events are not causally connected.

 

If your psychological process involves the development of a new role or orientation to life, and around the same time you also happen to lose your wallet, this is a synchronicity. Your wallet is where you keep your driver’s license and other cards that identify yourself to the rest of society. The loss of your wallet symbolically reflects your inner process of letting go of (or the need to let go of) an outmoded identity in favor of... (Click title for more)

more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, October 6, 2014 11:20 PM

More on synchronicity; meaningful coincidence and the dance between; where the inner and outer worlds of psyche intersect.

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung & the UFO Phenomenon

Carl Jung & the UFO Phenomenon | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

While Jung is known mainly for his theories on the nature of the unconscious mind, he did have an interest in the paranormal. In his books 'Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies', Jung applies his analytical skills to the UFO phenomenon. Rather than assuming that the modern prevalence of UFO sightings are due to extraterrestrial craft, Jung reserves judgment on their origin and connects UFOs with archetypal imagery, concluding that they have become a "living myth."

 

Jung's primary concern in Flying Saucers is not with the reality or unreality of UFOs but with their psychic aspect. Rather than speculate about their possible nature and extraterrestrial origin as alleged spacecraft, he asks what it may signify that these phenomena, whether real or imagined, are seen in such numbers just at a time when humankind is menaced as never before in history. The UFOs represent, in Jung's phrase, "a modern myth."... (Clik title for more)

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Liminality, Thresholds, and the Symbolic Landscape ~ Betsy Perluss PhD

Liminality, Thresholds, and the Symbolic Landscape ~ Betsy Perluss PhD | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

One of the greatest deceptions of modern culture is that there is no direct relationship between the external realm of matter and the realm of psyche. The lie continues to promote the notion that while the concrete realm is “objective”, clean and clear-cut, and rational, the realm of psyche, the dream realm, is “subjective”, vague, fuzzy, irrational, and thus, not worth serious attention.


Furthermore, through our scientific understanding of the world, which values the “objective” over the “subjective”, we have demythologized the natural world, extracting from it any symbolic meaning, having sent this back into the unconscious. The result, as Carl Jung states, is a world that has been emptied of soul and a human consciousness that stands aloof from creation, further promoting what Jung calls, “The Cult of Consciousness”.


Through scientific understanding, our world has become dehumanized. Man feels himself isolated in the cosmos. He is no longer involved in nature and has lost his emotional participation in natural events, which hitherto had a symbolic meaning for him. Thunder is no longer the voice of a god, nor is lightening his avenging missile. No river contains a spirit, no tree means... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung and I Ching

Carl Jung and I Ching | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In his introduction to the English version of I Ching made by one of his acquaintance, Jung admits having practiced the oracle 30 years before meeting Richard Wilhelm, the German translator of the book. He was interested in the method of exploration of the unconscious. He said:

 

"For more than thirty years I have interested myself in this oracle technique, or method of exploring the unconscious, for it has seemed to me of uncommon significance. I was already fairly familiar with the I Ching when I first met Wilhelm in the early nineteen twenties; he confirmed for me then what I already knew, and taught me many things more. (Foreword to the I Ching) ."

 

Using the oracle with his patients in psychotherapy Jung could remember a great deal of meaningful answers. He recalled the story of a patient stuck between ambivalent feelings related to... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Depth Psych Book Reviews
Scoop.it!

Jung, Synchronicity, And Human Destiny

Jung, Synchronicity, And Human Destiny | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Synchronicity refers to the underlying cosmic intelligence that synchronizes people, places and events into a meaningful order. We experience synchronicity when an outer event corresponds to our inner thoughts, perceptions or feelings. - Law of Time

 

Carl Jung is the Swiss psychologist and psychiatrist that founded “analytical psychology,” as well as the extravert and introvert psychological types.

 

Analytical psychology focuses on the whole of the human being, believing that the unconscious mind is the primary source for healing and is vital to the development of an individual’s soul. Unlike many psychologists and scientists, Jung believed the world of dreams, myth, and folklore, should be...(click title for more)

more...
Skip_Conover's curator insight, May 20, 2013 6:28 PM

via Maxwell Purrington

Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Jung e dintorni
Scoop.it!

Jung and Pauli on I Ching

Scribd is the world's largest social reading and publishing site.

Via Maxwell Purrington, Paola Spadaro
more...
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

The Robert Moss BLOG: Symbol magnets and Jung's fish tales

The Robert Moss BLOG: Symbol magnets and Jung's fish tales | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
When Jung was immersed in his study of the symbolism of the fish in Christianity, alchemy and world mythology, the theme started leaping at him in everyday life. On April 1, 1949, he made some notes about an ancient inscription describing a man whose bottom half was a fish. At lunch that day, he was served fish. In the conversation, there was talk of the custom of making an "April fish" - a European term for "April fool" - of someone.
    In the afternoon, a former patient of Jung's, whom he had not seen for months, arrived at his house and displayed him some "impressive" pictures of fish. That evening, Jung was shown embroidery that featured fishy sea monsters. The next day, another former patient he had not seen in a decade recounted a dream in which a large fish swam towards her.
    Several months later, mulling over this sequence as an example of the phenomenon he dubbed synchronicity, Jung walked by the lake near his house, returning to the same spot several times. The last time he repeated this loop, he found a fish a foot long lying on top of the sea-wall. Jung had seen no one else on the lake shore that morning. While the fish might have been dropped by a bird, its appearance seemed to him quite magical, part of a "run of chance" in which more than "chance" seemed to be at play
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Death By Synchronicity & The Life Of Pi

Death By Synchronicity & The Life Of Pi | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

C. G. Jung recognized that in the moment of their greatest creative expression, the artist is an unconscious vehicle for something beyond themselves. At these times, their pen carries the unspoken voice of the collective whole of their culture. Like a medium or indigenous healer, what comes through them at this time can be a curative–healing comes as we hear the unspoken thing, as the needed but rejected quality in us comes into consciousness. Here the shadow’s waiting gift is born into our hearts.

 

Psyche’s roots are webs connecting us all. And more than that, the deepest place inside of us touches somewhere beyond time and space. Jung witnessed innumerable examples of our extending around these bounds in his client’s lives and dreams and in his own. He saw how often we do this, often only recognizing it later, sometimes when it’s too late. ‘Déjà vu’–French for ‘seeing again’–references this part of our cultural experience... (Click title for more)

more...
Laura M. Smith's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:44 AM

I loved the movie, The Life of Pi. Such a powerful message on the human struggle for integration of the powerful forces that live within us. That we must consume the flesh of Salome as Jung did in The Red Book.

 

"Mr. Patel's is an astounding story, courage and endurance unparalleled in the history of ship-wrecks. Very few castaways can claim to have survived so long, and none in the company of an adult Bengal tiger." quote from the report read about Patel's survival.

 

Does this not speak to our own journey when in the presence of the truths about who we are? The tiger in us, the zebra, the hyena, and the orangutan. Dying to self is a series of small deaths, in each we learn and integrate and still we are more than the sum of our parts.

 

At the end it seems as if Pi has lost Richard Parker, as if he does not know that Richard Parker lives on in him.

 

If you haven't read this incredible book, you need to!

 

 

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Carl Gustav Jung and Synchronicity, Archetypes, and the Collective Unconscious

Carl Gustav Jung and Synchronicity, Archetypes, and the Collective Unconscious | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung created the term synchronicity to describe the alignment of "universal forces"with the life experiences of an individual. Jung believed that many experiences perceived as coincidences were not merely due to chance, but instead reflected the creation of an event or circumstance by the "coinciding" or alignment of such forces. The process of becoming intuitively aware and acting in harmony with these forces is what Jung labeled "individuation". Jung said that an individuated person would actually shape events around them through the communication of their consciousness with the collective unconscious

.

Jung coined the term “collective unconscious” to refer to that part of a person's unconscious which is common to all human beings, as opposed to personal unconscious, which is unique to each individual. According to Jung the collective unconscious contains archetypes, which are... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Foreword to the I Ching - By C. G. Jung

Foreword to the I Ching - By C. G. Jung | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Carl Jung's foreward to the "Book of Changes" about the IChing 

 

Since I am not a sinologue, a foreword to the Book of Changes from my hand must be a testimonial of my individual experience with this great and singular book. It also affords me a welcome opportunity to pay tribute again to the memory of my late friend, Richard Wilhelm. He himself was profoundly aware of the cultural significance of his translation of the I Ching, a version unrivaled in the West.

 

If the meaning of the Book of Changes were easy to grasp, the work would need no foreword. But this is far from being the case, for there is so much that is obscure about it that Western scholars have tended to dispose of it as a collection of "magic spells," either too abstruse to be intelligible, or of no value whatsoever. Legge's translation of the I Ching, up to now the only version available in English, has done little to make the work accessible to Western minds.[1]Wilhelm, however, has made every effort to open the way to an understanding of the symbolism of the text...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Wolfgang Pauli, Carl Jung, and the Acausal Connecting Principle: A Case Study in Transdisciplinarity

Wolfgang Pauli, Carl Jung, and the Acausal Connecting Principle: A Case Study in Transdisciplinarity | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Nicolescu’s quest for “a space of knowledge beyond the disciplines”4 is exemplified by the Pauli-Jung collaboration aimed at explication of a unifying or connecting principle bridging the gap between mind and matter.  Jung’s theory of synchronicity posited that certain events-often called coincidences-actually reveal the operation of an acausal connection between mental and physical events through meaning. Jung’s paradigmatic example of a synchronicity occurred during a therapy session.


In this session, his patient was in the midst of relating an intense dream she had had in which someone gave her a piece of gold jewelry in the shape of a scarab beetle. As she related the dream, Jung heard a tapping sound on the office window, which was caused by a very large insect flying repeatedly against the glass. He opened the window, and in flew a small goldish-green colored scarabeid beetle. The connection between the woman telling the dream and the appearance of the actual beetle is non-causal – the inner dream experience did not.... (click title to read entire post)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Men Are From Earth, And So Are Women: Marion Woodman: On The Inner Marriage Of The True Masculine And The True Feminine

Men Are From Earth, And So Are Women: Marion Woodman: On The Inner Marriage Of The True Masculine And The True Feminine | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

I’d never danced in church before I took a workshop with Marion Woodman. Being in the chapel of New York City’s Union Theological Seminary was a sort of homecoming for me: five years earlier I had stridden down the middle aisle of that chapel with a newly minted master of divinity degree in my hand.


Now a series of seemingly disconnected incidents had brought me back, as if by design, to attend Woodman’s workshop. The psychologist Carl Jung might have chalked it all up to “synchronicity” — a meaningful link between otherwise unrelated events. Woodman, a Jungian analyst herself, would no doubt... (click title to continue reading)

more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, November 18, 2014 1:15 AM

This is a wonderful article exemplifying the brilliance, wisdom and humour of Marion Woodman...

Michael Goodman's curator insight, November 18, 2014 11:58 AM

Thank you Bonnie for this piece on Marion Woodman. I had the opportunity to see her several years ago in Santa Barbara....she is a gift and her "body" of work is amazing.