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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Liminality, Thresholds, and the Symbolic Landscape ~ Betsy Perluss PhD

Liminality, Thresholds, and the Symbolic Landscape ~ Betsy Perluss PhD | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

One of the greatest deceptions of modern culture is that there is no direct relationship between the external realm of matter and the realm of psyche. The lie continues to promote the notion that while the concrete realm is “objective”, clean and clear-cut, and rational, the realm of psyche, the dream realm, is “subjective”, vague, fuzzy, irrational, and thus, not worth serious attention.


Furthermore, through our scientific understanding of the world, which values the “objective” over the “subjective”, we have demythologized the natural world, extracting from it any symbolic meaning, having sent this back into the unconscious. The result, as Carl Jung states, is a world that has been emptied of soul and a human consciousness that stands aloof from creation, further promoting what Jung calls, “The Cult of Consciousness”.


Through scientific understanding, our world has become dehumanized. Man feels himself isolated in the cosmos. He is no longer involved in nature and has lost his emotional participation in natural events, which hitherto had a symbolic meaning for him. Thunder is no longer the voice of a god, nor is lightening his avenging missile. No river contains a spirit, no tree means... (Click title for more)

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Snake Symbol Significance in Dreams

Snake Symbol Significance in Dreams | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The ouroboros, the snake forever swallowing its own tail, is a famous alchemical symbol of transformation. Jung saw the ouroboros much like he saw the mandala, as an archetypal template of the psyche symbolizing eternity and the law of endless return. Instead of looking at life as a finite game played between the bookends of birth and death, the ouroboros symbolizes a dynamic state of change and purification.

 

A literal ouroboros isn’t necessary for a dream to have its symbolic meaning. Since waking life snakes routinely shed their skins, they are ready made symbols for change and transformation. Dreams where snakes shed skin or seeing snake skins in a dream also symbolize change and transformation. Old, outgrown behavioral patterns, relationships, or even... (Click title for more)

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Depth Insights » Trickster and a Comedian Walk into a Bar: The Sacred Art of Transformation by Keith Morrison

Depth Insights » Trickster and a Comedian Walk into a Bar: The Sacred Art of Transformation by Keith Morrison | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

This article explores the significance of comedy as a transformative art form. Many treatises have been written on the significance of painting, literature, or film as mediums for sacred creativity but I found that research that focused upon similar aspects at work of the comedian turned up short. By distilling the essential elements of the trickster as an archetypal figure the following article illustrates how the cultural icon of the comedian resonates with and is shaped by this archetype.

 

Though the trickster is most often depicted as a mythological god or hero, the comedian, along with iconic figures like the alchemist or shaman, are actual facts of human history that are strongly bound by archetypal material which initiates transformation in a mercurial manner similar to the trickster. I put forth that through the art of comedy, the stand-up comedian taps into the ... (click title for more)

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What keeps you in the cave? Archetype of the Zombie

What keeps you in the cave? Archetype of the Zombie | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The Zombie, which is only increasing its popularity in films, comic books, and classic novel mash-ups, is an image that hardly needs an introduction.  They are dead people returned from the grave, wandering around the land, and groaning after the living.  Side-stepping the gory details, the classic Zombie is easy to recognize:   Insatiable hunger, a monotonously numbing routine, and a lack of individual choice are three primary characteristics of this pattern.  Any act, from voracious spending to pursuing increasing amounts of attention, qualifies as long as what you gain is never enough.

 

This is not consuming for sustenance, but as a temporary fulfillment, stilling any discontent and numbing you to the... (click title for more)

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Laura Smith's curator insight, November 1, 2013 5:24 PM

I have experienced zombies in my dreams. They often represent that part of me that is related to how I avoid feeling, how I avoid being in relationship. Mindless, numb, insatiable hunger for <insert your favorite flavor of human flesh>. It can represent a type of dissociation that maybe be prevalent as a version of bardo that keeps us from our higher selves and our connection to the Divine.

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Ghost Stories and Haunted Places: The Archetypes of Hauntings

Ghost Stories and Haunted Places: The Archetypes of Hauntings | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

When I read about folklore and even when I hear ghost stories that are true ghost stories, I hear patterns in them that correspond a little with Jung's archetypes.  Carl Jung was an early psychologist who believed  in something called a collective unconscious.  He believed all people drew their thoughts from a similar source and this accounted for why people from every different culture had myths and stories that were very similar without ever having known each other. 

 

For example; most cultures have a dragon myth and a Cinderella story. He also believed we all had universal symbols that we use to interpret the world.  Jung's main archetypes included the Great Mother, the wise old man, the child, the beautiful woman, the devil, the trickster, the scarecrow, and the shadow. These archetypes symbolize core desires within us. I think many of the hauntings I've explored fall into similar archetypes as these and I'm going to break down and explain some of these hauntings....

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Megan Kopke's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:31 PM

jung's archetypes in stories - ghost stories, fairy tales, etc. 

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Pomegranates: symbolism in mysticism and dreams

Pomegranates: symbolism in mysticism and dreams | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Last night I dreamed of pomegranates...

 

Carl Jung saw a garden of pomegranates when he was near to death: "“I myself was, so it seemed, in the Pardes Rimmonim, the garden of pomegranates, and the wedding of Tifereth with Malchuth was taking place. Or else I was Rabbi Simon ben Jochai, whose wedding in the afterlife was being celebrated. It was the mystic marriage as it appears in the Cabbalistic tradition. I cannot tell you how wonderful it was. I could only think continually, “Now this is the garden of pomegranates! Now this is the marriage.. (Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 26, 2:47 AM

The Pomegranate: Symbol of the fruit of the Underworld and perhaps,  thus signifying the marriage of the above and below. Tifereth (Beauty) and its married to Malkuth (kingdom). Love redeemed and made manifest in Matter. Lovely!

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Jungian Fairy Tale Interpretation

Jungian Fairy Tale Interpretation | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Who hasn’t remembered the experience of listening to a fairy tale as a child? Why were we so enthralled by these tales? Are these stories for adults or children? How do they differ from myths, legends and sagas?

 

I am going to interpret this fairy tale using a Jungian approach, and, as I do, try to explain some of the reasoning behind what I am doing. There are particular issues to bear in mind as we do this together : the whole tale is a description of the psychodynamics of an individuation process in one psyche, and, all characters in the tale represent structures in the psyche.

 

One thing I do know having worked with, and taught fairy tale interpretation, is that strong emotions are stirred up by our interaction with tales. People’s complexes and typology are constellated in uncanny ways through this work. The most common error one can make is to take a fairy tale character and expect human or... (Click title for more)

 

Bonnie Bright's insight:

#DepthPsych #Jungian

 

People’s complexes and typology are constellated in uncanny ways through fairy tales

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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 9, 4:49 AM
Fairy tales really are incomparable teaching tools for us about the personal complexes and how they interface with the collective. The bridge matter and spirit via the cultural imagination. What is most extraordinary, I find, exploring them now, as an adult, is how precisely fairy tales detail the alchemical processes that point us towards Individuation and the redemption. They are a imagination's blueprint for the soul journey.
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Jungian Archetype of the wolf - gods and godnesses, warriors and mothers, demons and outlaws, evil and uebermensch

Jungian Archetype of the wolf - gods and godnesses, warriors and mothers, demons and outlaws, evil and uebermensch | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In a few weeks, there is Whitsun, and I will make one of my occasional trips to the monastery. The rock monastery St. George is a development center of the Benedictine  order in the Austrian Inn valley. The religious exercise will be lead by a Benedictine monk, who happens to have formal psychoanalytic credentials and introduced the theme ”The archetype of the wolf” for what to my understanding is a spiritual hiking weekend.

 

It became clear during my research, that in mythology, religion, in legends and fairy tales the wolf has played an outstanding ambiguous, dualist and multidimensional role. The wolf archetype is so  central,  that how the wolf is viewed , is a mindset indicator of human,  secular or spiritual organisations or of  the society we live in. But there is much  more.... (click title to keep reading)

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The Power Of The Witch Archetype

The Power Of The Witch Archetype | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Since the traditions of modern witchcraft came out of the broom closet, witchcraft has undergone a reinvention or a rebirth. Many modern witches shy away from the archetypical image of the witch, with her many symbols like broom, cauldron, pointy hat, black cat, toads and other nightly creatures, the famous familiar spirits, spells, hexes and curses, contact to the spirits of the dead, shape shifting into animals, the knowledge of herbs and poisons, the legendary flying ointment, meetings on crossroads and old cemeteries or the fly threw the night on broomsticks or pitchforks.


Many modern witches claim that the stereotypical witch is only fantasy and that in truth witchcraft is and was different than this image.

Witchcraft evolved into a modern religion, which is ... (click title for more)

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Vampire, The Archetype

Vampire, The Archetype | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The vampire myth has appeared over the centuries in almost every culture, beginning with the earliest recorded epic from Babylonia, about 2000 years B.C. Although there are cultural variations in the various legends, there is always one defining trait of a vampire: a vampire sucks blood. It consumes another to sustain it's own life.

 

Blood stands for life, and blood is also the archetypal symbol of the soul (life energy) . Therefore blood is a central symbol in many religions, including the Christian. The central image of all vampire lore is blood...."  Click title for more....

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