Depth Psych
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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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A Jungian Analyst Talks about Psychological Types

A Jungian Analyst Talks about Psychological Types | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

John Beebe, M.D., is a Jungian analyst, editor of the San Francisco Jung Library Journal, co-editor of the Journal of Analytical Psychology, and an expert on Jung's psychological types.

While many people have become familiar with psychological types as a way of examining the differences between people, Dr. Beebe has been pioneering their use intrapsychically as a way to explore the depths of the psyche.


Trained at the Jung Institute in San Francisco with its strong tradition of interest in typology, in this wonderfully informal interview he gives us an intimate glimpse of what this neglected dimension of typology looks like in practice. He explains how his analysands often come to their own insights into their psychological types, and how he, himself, discovered the importance of dreams through his own depression, and encountered his own anima in the form of a Chinese laundress. And he deals with related questions about types and archetypes, and types and the inferior... (Click title for more)

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Types of Personality

Types of Personality | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The word “personality” often gets used pretty broadly today: we talk of someone “having personality” or “being a personality” – meaning that there’s something particularly expressive or obvious or typical about the way they conduct or express themselves; we talk about showbiz or sporting “personalities” – meaning they have a profile and a way about them that attracts attention.

 

Carl Jung’s theories have been around for almost 100 years now and are still very influential on the way that psychologists think about personality. As the table below illustrates, Jung proposed four pairs of “either or” mental preferences or what can be seen as “mental muscles”. We all have both preferences but one in each pair will be dominant over the other. Each item pair is described on the left of the chart with the word in red on the right explaining in one word what it is essentially targeting. Although this is certainly not the only way to classify personality, Jung’s model has been widely used on an... (Click title for more)

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Greek Gods in Mythology and as Archetypes in Your Personality

Greek Gods in Mythology and as Archetypes in Your Personality | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Who are the Greek gods? Their myths and symbols and their role as archetypes (personality types) with an introduction to the popular online personality test that reveals your god or goddess type.

Via Zeteticus
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Personal Branding and the Jungian Persona

Personal Branding and the Jungian Persona | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
The persona is simply your public personality. The better developed your persona is the better you will get on in the world.

 

Jung identified the persona as the bridge between the ego and the external world; in just the same way as the anima forms the bridge to the inner world. The persona is simply your public personality, the face you show the world. The better developed your persona is the better you will get on in the world.

 

This is a generalisation and suffers the limitations of any generalisation. Naturally some people get on pretty well with a very poorly developed persona, but these are the exceptions not the rule and then almost undoubtedly their progress in the world would have been enhanced had they a better, more cultivated, persona.

 

Bottom line, the persona is an invaluable tool in public life and social interaction. It plays an important role even in private life, your interaction with intimate friends and... (click title for more)

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Carl Jung and Jungian Analytical Psychology

Carl Jung and Jungian Analytical Psychology | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Jung saw in unconscious material, especially dreams and fantasies, an unfolding of a process of individuation - the idea of continual, lifelong personal development.

 

According to Jung, the Ego - the "I" or self-conscious faculty - has four inseparable functions, four fundamental ways of perceiving and interpreting reality: Thinking, Feeling, Sensation, and Intuition. Generally, we tend to favor our most developed function, which becomes dominant, while we can broaden our personality by developing the others. Jung noted that the unconscious often tends to reveal itself most easily through a person's least developed, or "inferior" function. The encounter with the unconscious and development of the underdeveloped function(s) thus tend to progress together.

 

Jung understood and acknowledged the enormous importance of sexuality in the development of the personality, but he perceived the unconscious as encompassing much more. In addition he saw in unconscious material, especially dreams and fantasies, an unfolding... (Click title for more)

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Essential Secrets of Psychotherapy: Jung's Typology, Eudaemonology, and the Elusive Art of Happiness

Essential Secrets of Psychotherapy: Jung's Typology, Eudaemonology, and the Elusive Art of Happiness | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Why do introverts and extraverts have such difficulty relating to each other?

 

The terms "introvert" and "extravert" (note the proper spelling with a rather than o) were originally introduced by Swiss psychiatrist C.G. Jung in his now classic text Psychological Types (1921). People are sometimes surprised to learn that Jung's text is the basis for the popular Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI).

 

Traditionally, because we in western culture tend to take a more extraverted orientation to life (as compared, for instance, to India and Asia), introverts have long been prejudicially perceived as being selfish, narcissistic, pathologically shy or even psychotic. But this sometimes vicious negative bias toward introverts and introversion has started to change lately, due in part to the... (Click title for more)

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 26, 2014 8:39 PM

There are excellent points made. The point about introverts being labelled unfairly is accurate. It is how we re-charge our batteries. We like quiet in those moments.

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Jung and the Four Psychological Functions

Jung and the Four Psychological Functions | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In Psychological Types Jung (1971/1921) describes four basic psychic functions that are capable of becoming conscious: intuition, sensation, feeling, and thinking:

 

Under sensation I include all perceptions by means of the sense organs; by thinking, I mean the function of intellectual cognition and the forming of logical conclusions; feeling is a function of subjective evaluation; intuition I take as perception by way of the unconscious, or perception of unconscious events. (p. 518) 

 

   Jung goes on to explain that, in his experience, there are only four basic functions, a fact that seems to be self-evident if one inquires into the possibilities. These psychic functions are the methods employed by humans to acquire knowledge of themselves and the surrounding world; cognition is not restricted to one function, and each function provides its own kind of knowledge.

   Of equal importance in Jung's typology are the attitude types of introversion and extraversion, which... (click title to read more)

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