Depth Psych
Follow
Find tag "archetype"
21.7K views | +7 today
Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
Curated by Bonnie Bright
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung's Near Death Experience

Carl Jung's Near Death Experience | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In a hospital in Switzerland in 1944, the world-renowned psychiatrist Carl G. Jung, had a heart attack and then a near-death experience. His vivid encounter with the light, plus the intensely meaningful insights led Jung to conclude that his experience came from something real and eternal. Jung’s experience is unique in that he saw the Earth from a vantage point of about a thousand miles above it. 

His incredibly accurate view of the Earth from outer space was described about two decades before astronauts in space first described it. Subsequently, as he reflected on life after death, Jung recalled the meditating Hindu from his near-death experience and read it as a parable of the archetypal Higher Self, the God-image within. Carl Jung, who founded analytical psychology, centered on the archetypes of the collective unconscious. The following is an excerpt from his autobiography

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Snake Symbol Significance in Dreams

Snake Symbol Significance in Dreams | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The ouroboros, the snake forever swallowing its own tail, is a famous alchemical symbol of transformation. Jung saw the ouroboros much like he saw the mandala, as an archetypal template of the psyche symbolizing eternity and the law of endless return. Instead of looking at life as a finite game played between the bookends of birth and death, the ouroboros symbolizes a dynamic state of change and purification.

 

A literal ouroboros isn’t necessary for a dream to have its symbolic meaning. Since waking life snakes routinely shed their skins, they are ready made symbols for change and transformation. Dreams where snakes shed skin or seeing snake skins in a dream also symbolize change and transformation. Old, outgrown behavioral patterns, relationships, or even... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung & Astrology: The Freud/Jung Letters

In May of 1911 Dr. Carl G Jung (1875-1961) wrote his (at that time) mentor Sigmund Freud saying: "Occultism is another field we shall have to conquer - with the aid of the libido theory, it seems to me. At the moment I am looking into astrology, which seems indispensable for a proper understanding of mythology. There are strange and wondrous things in these lands of darkness."

 

Jung, then, cautiously added: "Please don't worry about my wanderings in these infinitudes. I shall return laden with rich booty for our knowledge of the human psyche.... For a while longer I must intoxicate myself on magic perfumes in order to fathom the secrets that lie hidden in the abysses of the unconscious..." (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Depth Insights » Trickster and a Comedian Walk into a Bar: The Sacred Art of Transformation by Keith Morrison

Depth Insights » Trickster and a Comedian Walk into a Bar: The Sacred Art of Transformation by Keith Morrison | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

This article explores the significance of comedy as a transformative art form. Many treatises have been written on the significance of painting, literature, or film as mediums for sacred creativity but I found that research that focused upon similar aspects at work of the comedian turned up short. By distilling the essential elements of the trickster as an archetypal figure the following article illustrates how the cultural icon of the comedian resonates with and is shaped by this archetype.

 

Though the trickster is most often depicted as a mythological god or hero, the comedian, along with iconic figures like the alchemist or shaman, are actual facts of human history that are strongly bound by archetypal material which initiates transformation in a mercurial manner similar to the trickster. I put forth that through the art of comedy, the stand-up comedian taps into the ... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Returning Soul to Astrology

Returning Soul to Astrology | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

I would contend that soul's absence denotes a loss of depth, meaning, and attachment. In a society driven by disposable consumerism, we have lost a deep understanding of lack, of doing without, of making do, of abstinence, celibacy, solitude, restraint, and limitation. Americans tend toward expansive, growth-oriented, manic, Jupiterian lifestyles and leave no place for Saturnine melancholia. In an effort to increase the levity and leisure in our lives, we have neglected the gravity of existence. We move restlessly about, disposing of dwellings, vehicles, relationships, possessions; changing our beliefs, families, and lifestyles as easily as changing undergarments; and pursuing the fantasy of growth and progress.

 

We are by no means materialists as some would clamor, but rather we are spiritists who have little or no appreciation for the material world, while believing in the abstraction or idea of things with no attachment to the things themselves. We live in counterfeit and artifice... (click title for more)

more...
Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:49 PM
Produits Universaliss Bank....Produits Universaliss Laboratory
http://www.universaliss.net/leader/trader/mpfr/belkacem1173  ;
Eva Rider's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:36 PM

A refreshing look at  meaning of gravity and materialism. The qualities of Saturn that help us to steer through limitation and obstacles. When the road narrows, the path reveals itself as the only one. This is of evident in our process of aging, revealing Saturn's profound role as teacher. As we shed what is uneccessary in our lives, we discover the true gold on the other side of Saturn.

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Jungian Archetype of the wolf - gods and godnesses, warriors and mothers, demons and outlaws, evil and uebermensch

Jungian Archetype of the wolf - gods and godnesses, warriors and mothers, demons and outlaws, evil and uebermensch | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In a few weeks, there is Whitsun, and I will make one of my occasional trips to the monastery. The rock monastery St. George is a development center of the Benedictine  order in the Austrian Inn valley. The religious exercise will be lead by a Benedictine monk, who happens to have formal psychoanalytic credentials and introduced the theme ”The archetype of the wolf” for what to my understanding is a spiritual hiking weekend.

 

It became clear during my research, that in mythology, religion, in legends and fairy tales the wolf has played an outstanding ambiguous, dualist and multidimensional role. The wolf archetype is so  central,  that how the wolf is viewed , is a mindset indicator of human,  secular or spiritual organisations or of  the society we live in. But there is much  more.... (click title to keep reading)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

The Power Of The Witch Archetype

The Power Of The Witch Archetype | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Since the traditions of modern witchcraft came out of the broom closet, witchcraft has undergone a reinvention or a rebirth. Many modern witches shy away from the archetypical image of the witch, with her many symbols like broom, cauldron, pointy hat, black cat, toads and other nightly creatures, the famous familiar spirits, spells, hexes and curses, contact to the spirits of the dead, shape shifting into animals, the knowledge of herbs and poisons, the legendary flying ointment, meetings on crossroads and old cemeteries or the fly threw the night on broomsticks or pitchforks.


Many modern witches claim that the stereotypical witch is only fantasy and that in truth witchcraft is and was different than this image.

Witchcraft evolved into a modern religion, which is ... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

The Bride and the Coniunctio: An Archetypal Image of Love and Union | Dr. Jeff Howlin

The Bride and the Coniunctio: An Archetypal Image of Love and Union | Dr. Jeff Howlin | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The wedding and specifically the bride just might be one of the grandest of all archetypal images. We commonly associate weddings with the bride and the groom, but I’m going to make a case for the bride alone as a prime archetypal image and symbol for transpersonal love and union–the alchemical phase of the coniunctio.

 

But before I talk about archetypes, unions and the coniunctio, I feel a need to mention a qualifier. This post is personal for me.  I was married several months ago, and I still retain the feelings and keen memories of the experience and what it felt like to be swept away by love.

 

While reflecting upon standing at the alter while waiting for and watching the bride walking down the aisle, I realized two things. One was this: ”we” (bride and groom) and “I,” were a part of something much larger. And two: the bride and her image, carried the wedding.  Even the behavior of those attending spoke to this, as people and the ceremony itself pivoted around the bride. And this is how it should be, because the image of the bride is so much more than a woman getting married to a man.

 

Since this article also talks about the often misunderstood Jungian concept of the archetype, I’m going to use a metaphor by Jung himself ... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Are We Implicated?--A Depth Psychological and Cultural Take on the Fall of Lance Armstrong

Are We Implicated?--A Depth Psychological and Cultural Take on the Fall of Lance Armstrong | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

I was out of town for a conference the weekend the two-part Lance Armstrong interview with Oprah broke and missed it entirely, but the fall-out is hard to miss. Normally I am a bit of a media addict, fascinated and equally reactive to what I consider to be a culture in decline, symptomatic even, of impending collapse.

 

Our priorities seem so out of whack; our values in tatters, our goals absurd. I’m speaking for myself as well as the collective of course. Each of us is quite embedded in our values, beliefs, and behaviors--a result of our upbringing, education, religious ties, political views, social status, and so much more that we tend to take for granted. As a whole, we shore up the culture, buying into the “way things are,” enabling practices that are less than generative.

 

Regarding the “Lance” story, though--as one of my peers in the Depth Psychology Alliance community recently pointed out--nobody does the kind of thing Lance has done in a vacuum. Our fallen heroes are...(Click title to keep reading)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Vampire, The Archetype

Vampire, The Archetype | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The vampire myth has appeared over the centuries in almost every culture, beginning with the earliest recorded epic from Babylonia, about 2000 years B.C. Although there are cultural variations in the various legends, there is always one defining trait of a vampire: a vampire sucks blood. It consumes another to sustain it's own life.

 

Blood stands for life, and blood is also the archetypal symbol of the soul (life energy) . Therefore blood is a central symbol in many religions, including the Christian. The central image of all vampire lore is blood...."  Click title for more....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Wounded Healer

Wounded Healer | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Wounded Healer: An archetypal dynamic that may be constellated in an analytic relationship.


This term derives from the legend of Asclepius, a Greek doctor who in recognition of his own wounds established a sanctuary at Epidaurus where others could be healed of their ‘wounds’.


Those seeking to be cured went through a process called incubation. First they had a cleansing bath, thought to have a purifying effect on the soul as well as the body. Uncontaminated by the body, the soul was free to commune with the gods. After preliminary sacrificial offerings, the incubants lay on a couch and went to sleep. If they were lucky, they had a healing dream; if they were luckier, a snake came in the night and bit them.


The wounded healer archetype can be schematized by a variation of the diagram used by Jung to illustrate the lines of communication in a relationship...(click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Great Mother Archetype

Great Mother Archetype | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In Container, the third article in my series on leaving home, I wrote briefly about what can happen when a child’s need for balanced “containment” and nurturance are not met in the family of origin, and she grows up uncontained, unprotected, and without nurture. The opposite can happen, of course, and a child can grow up over-protected by an over-involved mother or father, as in the case of some religiously home schooled children, for example. And it is to the concept of opposites and ends of the bell curve that we must now turn, for when we write in Jungian terms about mothers, we are writing not only one’s own actual mother, but about the archetype of mother, one Jung referred to as theGreat Mother.


Jung believed that the influence of the mother on a child derived not only from the actual mother, but also from the Great Mother archetype, a universal image or symbol, along with influences from the child’s own psyche. The child’s idea of “mother” may or may not correspond accurately to the actual mother, then, depending on the child’s... (click title for more

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

ARE WE POSSESSED?

ARE WE POSSESSED? | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

C. G. Jung, the great doctor of the soul and one of the most inspired psychologists of the twentieth century, had incredible insight into what is currently playing out, both individually and collectively, in our modern-day world. He writes, “If, for a moment, we look at mankind as one individual, we see that it is like a man carried away by unconscious powers.” We are a species carried away — “possessed” by — and acting out, the unconscious. (Image from Lantern Hollow Press)

 

Jung elaborates, “Possession, though old-fashioned, has by no means become obsolete; only the name has changed. Formerly they spoke of ‘evil spirits,’ now we call them ‘neurosis’ or ‘unconscious complexes.’” To condescendingly think that we, as modern-day, rational people, are too sophisticated to believe in something as primitive as demons is to have fallen under the spell of the very evil spirits we are imagining are nonexistent. What the ancients call demons are a psychic phenomena which compel us to act out behaviors contrary to our best intentions...

(Click title to read more)

more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, March 20, 1:28 AM

Are we possessed? Addiction is possession. How do we awaken and break the spell?

Laura Smith's curator insight, March 20, 11:31 AM

An extremely long and interesting article about how we become a slave to our false perceptions of who we are and of who we think others are...In Archetypal Dreamwork, we refer to pathology as the "demon" that gets in and takes over, driving us to act or believe in ways that are not true to our soul. As a colleague stated recently, pathology is a force that moves us further from God, or said differently, further from our soul. Mr. Levy speaks, as did Jung, about the "mass possession" in which a whole group or society suffers from and acts out the neurosis. Perhaps our continual pursuit of the proverbial "more" is and example of this and the devastation to our planet is the consequence.

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Hephaestus or Vulcan: Artisan of the Greek and Roman Gods by Torrey Philemon (Tracy Marks)

Hephaestus or Vulcan: Artisan of the Greek and Roman Gods by Torrey Philemon (Tracy Marks) | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Metalworker, blacksmith, and artisan, Hephaestus was the only Greek god that worked. In mythology, he is honored for having taught mankind that work is noble (Homeric Hymn to Hephaestus), and having imparted the desire not  not only to work, but to excel at one's craft. Understandably, he therefore became the patron god of artists and craftsmen of all kinds - metalworkers, blacksmiths, leatherworkers, weavers, potters, painters.

 

Much of the time, Hephaestus was at his volcanic forge, passionately engaged in solitary creative work, resulting in creations that spoke to the psychic depths of both gods and humans. He had the power to reach into the collective unconscious, and to create works (such as Achilles shield) which were extraordinarily beautiful, detailed, and lifelike.  

 

One reason for Hephaestus' appeal to many men and women throughout the ages is that he personifies the psychological archetype of the wounded creator or artist - rejected initially by both mother and father....

more...
Aladin Fazel's curator insight, November 21, 2013 5:28 AM

A God who worked! 

Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:46 PM

TOUT EST GRATUIT mon ami sinon je je n'y serais pas lol !
http://www.globallshare.com/fr/1200655.html

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

» It’s Halloween: Recognizing Our Shadow Side - Psych Central

» It’s Halloween: Recognizing Our Shadow Side - Psych Central | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Watching a friend struggle to create an owl costume for her pre-schooler to wear this Halloween, I asked her why she didn’t persuade him to think of something simpler. “He says he wants to be an owl because it’s the scariest thing he can think of,” my friend replied.

 

Ahh. Precisely. Her little guy is wiser than I am. He knows instinctively what I had forgotten: From ancient times, the point of Halloween has always been to confront our fears of the dark, of death, of evil spirits and all the things that “go bump in the night.”

 

Death always has been and probably always will be a mystery and mysteries make people nervous. Our fears and anxieties about what happens next has driven the imagination of ... (click title for more)

more...
Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 4, 2013 4:46 PM

TOUT EST GRATUIT mon ami sinon je je n'y serais pas lol !
http://www.globallshare.com/fr/1200655.html

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

What keeps you in the cave? Archetype of the Zombie

What keeps you in the cave? Archetype of the Zombie | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The Zombie, which is only increasing its popularity in films, comic books, and classic novel mash-ups, is an image that hardly needs an introduction.  They are dead people returned from the grave, wandering around the land, and groaning after the living.  Side-stepping the gory details, the classic Zombie is easy to recognize:   Insatiable hunger, a monotonously numbing routine, and a lack of individual choice are three primary characteristics of this pattern.  Any act, from voracious spending to pursuing increasing amounts of attention, qualifies as long as what you gain is never enough.

 

This is not consuming for sustenance, but as a temporary fulfillment, stilling any discontent and numbing you to the... (click title for more)

more...
Laura Smith's curator insight, November 1, 2013 5:24 PM

I have experienced zombies in my dreams. They often represent that part of me that is related to how I avoid feeling, how I avoid being in relationship. Mindless, numb, insatiable hunger for <insert your favorite flavor of human flesh>. It can represent a type of dissociation that maybe be prevalent as a version of bardo that keeps us from our higher selves and our connection to the Divine.

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Ghost Stories and Haunted Places: The Archetypes of Hauntings

Ghost Stories and Haunted Places: The Archetypes of Hauntings | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

When I read about folklore and even when I hear ghost stories that are true ghost stories, I hear patterns in them that correspond a little with Jung's archetypes.  Carl Jung was an early psychologist who believed  in something called a collective unconscious.  He believed all people drew their thoughts from a similar source and this accounted for why people from every different culture had myths and stories that were very similar without ever having known each other. 

 

For example; most cultures have a dragon myth and a Cinderella story. He also believed we all had universal symbols that we use to interpret the world.  Jung's main archetypes included the Great Mother, the wise old man, the child, the beautiful woman, the devil, the trickster, the scarecrow, and the shadow. These archetypes symbolize core desires within us. I think many of the hauntings I've explored fall into similar archetypes as these and I'm going to break down and explain some of these hauntings....

more...
Megan Kopke's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:31 PM

jung's archetypes in stories - ghost stories, fairy tales, etc. 

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

On Magic, Shamanism, and Listening: The Collective Unconscious of C.G. Jung

On Magic, Shamanism, and Listening: The Collective Unconscious of C.G. Jung | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

“If we open our eyes, if we open our minds, if we open our hearts, will find that this world is a magical place. It is magical not because it tricks us or changes unexpectedly into something else, but because it can be so vividly and brilliantly.”--Chogyam Trungpa


When I was a child, I longed for magic: actively, forcefully, wistfully. I spent thousands of hours reading books about witches and wizards and fairies and everyday objects endowed with supernatural powers, I read about kids who time-traveled or fell into other dimensions or discovered secret portals to other lives. I always wanted to be one of those characters from the story, happening on magic that would transport me from my problems, my boredom, my malaise (French translation: being poorly-at-ease) with life. As I grew older, I stopped believing...

 

Our ancestors had far more contact with magic. They lived life closer to nature, a force larger than life. They saw themselves as an intrinsic part of a pattern that happened around them and to them and in them and through them, an ongoing dialogue with equals. Rather than placing themselves above the objects we see as inanimate, everything they saw and experienced in the physical world was a endowed with the life force... (Click title to read full post)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Jung and the Archetype of the Apocalypse

Jung and the Archetype of the Apocalypse | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
As we have noted in earlier essays,[1] Jung was very intuitive. Thanks to his keen intuition he was able to sense shifts in the collective consciousness long before outer changes made these shifts obvious to others. One of the shifts he noted was the approach of the end time and the activation of what he called the archetype of the apocalypse.[2] As early as the 1950’s Jung foresaw the approach of the “end time.”[3]
Jung felt it was important for people to know about this archetype because he recognized the power each individual has to change the future.[4] He knew that if enough people become aware of the apocalypse, as an archetype, understand its intentions and internalize its meaning in their own lives, the fate of the world might be more positive.[5] In this essay we are going to discuss briefly the meaning and features of archetypes, with particular attention to the archetype of the apocalypse, and then consider how... (Click on the title to continue reading)
more...
No comment yet.