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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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The Shamanic Perspective: Where Jungian Thought and Archetypal Shamanism Converge

The Shamanic Perspective: Where Jungian Thought and Archetypal Shamanism Converge | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Studies in anthropology led Jung to adopt into psychology a concept prevalent in shamanic societies: that of soul loss. Typically recognized as a state of general malaise, soul loss provides another common thread between both Jungian psychology and shamanism.

 

Soul loss is a fragmentary sequence in which parts of the whole wander away, flee, or get split off, lost, or disoriented resulting in a loss of vitality or life force (Ingerman, 1991). In a shamanic worldview, the dislocated parts are carried away to the underworld; in psychology, they are said to recede into the unconscious.

 

With the critical absence of vital parts of our soul, we are left feeling weak, empty, depressed, deflated, or anxious, and commonly trend toward mental or physical illness. Jung cited the loss of connection between our ego and the Self as the fundamental cause of soul loss... (Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, May 6, 2014 3:27 PM

Anyone on a Spiritual journey is too well familiar with the experience of soul loss. It is also what has been called "the dark night of the soul".

It is often only "Grace" that transforms this state and redeposits us back into the topside world again. When we return, (if we return) we are are not the same. Transformed, because we have been through a death and re-birth either metaphorically or physically. We become the Initiated and are required to pass on the knowledge and wisdom we have gained in the underworld journeys.

Some of the Images for the transformed state in western myth that we recognize are the butterfly and the phoenix and the redeemed god.

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The Soul of the Soldier: An Archetypal Inquiry into the Rhetoric of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

The Soul of the Soldier: An Archetypal Inquiry into the Rhetoric of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The United States of America has been in an uninterrupted state of war for almost 250 years (Marsella, 2011). 250 years of violence and loss… In these brutal battles, the soul of the soldier also becomes a casualty. The veterans who return home are haunted by memories of terror and bloodshed. For them a new fight begins on this ground−a fight for dignity, honor, and health−as they face the cold-blooded diagnosis and rhetoric of psychopathology.

 

The fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) (2000) strives for “brevity of criteria sets, clarity of language, and explicit statements of the constructs embodied in the diagnostic criteria” (p. xxiii). Yet in the name of brevity, clarity, and explicitness, this thick book betrays the depths of archetypal experiences. It avoids all possible contradiction, necessary tension, and expressive complexities that belong to psyche’s ways of being and its pathologies. With its codes and bullet points, the DSM-IV classifies and categorizes... (click title for more)

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How One Becomes a Shaman: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 2

How One Becomes a Shaman: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 2 | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

How One Becomes a Shaman

Given the seemingly differing opinions on the history of shamanism and the definition of a shaman, there seems to be substantially more agreement on the process by which one must undergo to become a shaman. According to Merchant (2006):

 

The ‘call of the spirits’ to the shamanic vocation is experienced as a serious and disturbing psychological phenomenon early in life (often at adolescence) and this initiatory illness is interpreted as a (mostly unsolicited) calling, which is not only experienced as a destiny/fate but is articulated in these cultures as an election by the spirits. A strenuous and difficult initiation follows, involving altered states of consciousness, dismemberment imagery and death/rebirth phenomena. (p. 133-4)

 

The candidate is not fully recognized by their cultural group as a shaman until they are able to demonstrate their abilities of mastery over the spirits and communicate with them to acquire information for the purposes of healing (Merchant, 2006). Metzner (1998), like Merchant (2006), referred to a process where the shaman-to-be has visions in which they see themselves being dismembered...(Click title for more)

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