Depth Psych
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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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C.G. Jung: “I have again and again been faced with the mystery of love and have never been able to explain what it is.”

C.G. Jung: “I have again and again been faced with the mystery of love and have never been able to explain what it is.” | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Carl Jung speaks of love:

 

“In classical times, when such things were properly understood, Eros was considered a god whose divinity transcended our human limits, and who therefore could be neither comprehended nor represented in any way.

 

I might, as many before me have attempted to do, venture an approach to this daimon, whose range of activity extends from the endless spaces of the heavens to the dark abysses of hell; but I falter before the task of finding the language which might adequately express the incalculable paradoxes of love.

 

Eros is a kosmogonos, a creator and father-mother of all higher consciousness. I sometimes feel that Paul’s words—“Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not love”—might be the first condition of all cognition and the quintessence of divinity itself. Whatever the learned interpretation of the sentence “God is love,” the words affirm the ... (Click title to read more)

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Depth Insights » "Wotan in the Shadows: Analytical Psychology and the Archetypal Roots of War" by Ritske Rensma

Depth Insights » "Wotan in the Shadows: Analytical Psychology and the Archetypal Roots of War" by Ritske Rensma | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung lived in a time of crisis. He was confronted with the atrocities of two world wars, spent his final years in the climate of the cold war, and was hugely concerned about mankind’s inability to find solutions to the recurring occurrences of mass conflict he was forced to witness in his lifetime. It should come as no surprise, then, that Jung wrote extensively about the possible causes of war and conflict. A central notion which he defended throughout his career was that the roots of war are to be found in the human psyche, in what he called our “war-like instincts,” which we will never be able to eradicate:


"Anything that disappears from your psychological inventory is apt to turn up in the guise of a hostile neighbor, who will inevitably arouse your anger and make you aggressive. It is surely better to know that your worst enemy is right there in your own heart. Man‘s war-like instincts are ineradicable – therefore a state of perfect peace is unthinkable..."


- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/wotan-in-the-shadows-analytical-psychology-and-the-archetypal-roots-of-war-by-dr-ritske-rensma/#sthash.kSBbesZw.dpuf

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On Magic, Shamanism, and Listening: The Collective Unconscious of C.G. Jung

On Magic, Shamanism, and Listening: The Collective Unconscious of C.G. Jung | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

“If we open our eyes, if we open our minds, if we open our hearts, will find that this world is a magical place. It is magical not because it tricks us or changes unexpectedly into something else, but because it can be so vividly and brilliantly.”--Chogyam Trungpa


When I was a child, I longed for magic: actively, forcefully, wistfully. I spent thousands of hours reading books about witches and wizards and fairies and everyday objects endowed with supernatural powers, I read about kids who time-traveled or fell into other dimensions or discovered secret portals to other lives. I always wanted to be one of those characters from the story, happening on magic that would transport me from my problems, my boredom, my malaise (French translation: being poorly-at-ease) with life. As I grew older, I stopped believing...

 

Our ancestors had far more contact with magic. They lived life closer to nature, a force larger than life. They saw themselves as an intrinsic part of a pattern that happened around them and to them and in them and through them, an ongoing dialogue with equals. Rather than placing themselves above the objects we see as inanimate, everything they saw and experienced in the physical world was a endowed with the life force... (Click title to read full post)

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Depression During the Holidays

Depression During the Holidays | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

We all have complexes. At the heart of every complex there is a trauma, and also the archetype of that situation, providing the instinctual response and symbols.

 

When something triggers a complex, we are automatically identified with its underlying archetype. They are a trio—trauma, complex, and archetype—and the particular trio leading to the Outsider is perhaps the most dangerous. Humans very often simply despair and give up when they feel permanently left out in the cold... (Click title for more)

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Depth Insights » Frontispiece for Liber Novus: Biblical Texts on Folio Page One of the Red Book by Gerald F. Kegler

Depth Insights » Frontispiece for Liber Novus: Biblical Texts on Folio Page One of the Red Book by Gerald F. Kegler | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

C.G. Jung opens his Liber Novus (The Red Book) with several elements: an elaborately painted initial, “Der Weg des Kommenden” (The Way That is to Come), three calligraphic script passages in Latin from the biblical book of Isaiah, and one from the Gospel According to John.


This material fills the entire first page and closes in Latin with, “Written by C.G. Jung with his own hand in his house in Kusnach/Zurich in the year 1915” (Jung, 2009, folio p. 1). Shamdasani (2012) places Jung’s Red Book in the tradition of William Blake’s illuminated printing.


Jung combined poetic word and artistic imagery in the creation of the Liber Novus. Like the frontispiece of Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, we may appropriately characterize this first folio page as the frontispiece for Liber Primus and the whole Liber Novus.


- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/frontispiece-for-liber-novus-biblical-texts-on-folio-page-one-of-the-red-book-bygerald-f-kegler/#sthash.REmvJ9ZB.dpuf

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Ensoulment and Synchronicity: Concepts from Cosmos and Psyche by Richard Tarnas

Ensoulment and Synchronicity: Concepts from Cosmos and Psyche by Richard Tarnas | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In his 2006 book Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View, Rick Tarnas suggests that the western mind has catapulted us away from a fundamental cosmos where everything was ensouled, alive, and animated by meaning and archetype.


Our modern mindset is, instead, to attempt to control and manipulate our environment, making us the active subject in any interaction, and the things we see around us the passive object. Tarnas suggests “disenchantment” refers to the way the world is objectified, thereby denying subjectivity.


“Objectification,” he contends, “denies to the world a subject’s capacity to intend, to signify intelligently, to express it's meaning, to embody and communicate humanly relevant purposes and ... (Click title to keep reading)

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A Rosemont Journey's curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:04 PM

Here's a belief very simple clear and true; if you want love, then be love.
Ultimately you are a reservoir for all you know and experience.