Depth Psych
39.8K views | +2 today
Follow
Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
Curated by Bonnie Bright
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

DEVASTATING THE EARTH and ANIMALS: THE FUTILITY OF WAR--by Jane Goodall

DEVASTATING THE EARTH and ANIMALS: THE FUTILITY OF WAR--by Jane Goodall | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In 1960 I began my study of chimpanzees on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in what is now Tanzania. At that time chimpanzee habitat stretched for miles, fringing the lake from Burundi to Zambia in the south. Today, the scene is very different: cultivated land crowds up to the boundaries of the park, the trees have gone, peasants are trying to grow crops on the steep rocky hillsides, causing terrible erosion, the soil is losing its fertility, the forest animals have gone, and the human population is struggling to survive.


What has caused this devastation? Wild animals (as well as livestock) are often direct casualties of war. Soldiers as well as refugees hunt wildlife for food. According to the Biodiversity Support Program, war in the DRC in 1996 and 1997 led to an escalation in poaching in one area that reduced the elephant population by half, buffalo by two-thirds, and hippo by three-quarters. Gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos, already seriously endangered by the commercial bush meat trade, were also affected. Not only do land mines maim innocent humans - hundreds of animals...(Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

C.G. Jung —In the Heart of Darkness

C.G. Jung —In the Heart of Darkness | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In 1925 Carl Jung traveled in East Africa. Although he had imagined initially he was involved in a scientific inquiry into "primitive psychology" (the Bugishu Psychological Expedition), he was later to admit that in all honesty his true intent was to pose to himself "the rather embarrassing question: What is going to happen to Jung the psychologist in the wilds of Africa?" (Memories, Dreams, Reflections, 272).

 

During his stay in Africa, Jung had only one dream with a black person in it. In the dream he was with an "American Negro," who had been his barber in Chattanooga, Tennessee, when he had visited the U.S. twelve years previous. The barber held to Jung’s head a red-hot iron in an attempt to render his hair nappy. He awoke with terror. Jung took this dream to be a dire warning from the unconscious that he was in danger of being engulfed by primitivity. "At that time I was obviously all too close to ‘going black.’"

 

It is far too simple a distraction to use this essay here to piss on the clay feet of the great man. Throughout Jung’s memoirs, one is impressed by the subtlety and complexity of his mind and the depth of his psychological insight – except when he writes about... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.