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3D Printing Transforming Orthodontics at NimroDENTAL Lab

For more information on 3D printers for digital dentistry and orthodontics visit https://goo.gl/OuMoYJ If you are looking to implement 3D printing into you
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Dental Services Market Revenue, Key Players, Supply-Demand, Investment Feasibility and Forecast 2022 |

Dental Services Market Revenue, Key Players, Supply-Demand, Investment Feasibility and Forecast 2022 | | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Dental Services Market is expected to witness growth of international market with respect to advancements and innovations including development history, co
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3D Printing in Everyday Dental Practice

3D Printing in Everyday Dental Practice | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it

Advances in dental technology continue to improve patient comfort, shorten treatment times, and improve the efficiency and accuracy of the restorative process. The messy, unpleasant experience associated with taking impressions is no longer a given. Today, intraoral scanners can take a full spectrum of digital impressions ranging from single unit cases, to multiunit restoration to full arch scans to implants. In 2005, after searching for a solution to eliminate the “goo” and mess of impression taking, I was the first dentist to fully integrate iTero digital scanning into everyday dental practice. The “digital” impressions captured by intraoral scanners have been used for years to create the models used by dental labs but producing models to support traditional laboratory processes does not fully leverage the possibilities of digital dental impressions. Creating restorations completely without physical models was a next logical step. The principle was simple enough, but producing the full range of restorations without a physical model, required a dental laboratory partner adept at spatial data processing, CAD/CAM additive manufacturing (AM) and design verification. Advances with in-house milling technology now allow intraoral digital scan data to be sent directly to my CAD software, and design a crown in minutes. The digital data in STL format is then sent to a milling unit capable of milling lithium silicate, lithium di-silicate and even pre-sintered zirconia. The milling times are now reduced such that we are able to produce a crown in an hour, from prep start to design to mill to final delivery. FIGURE 8 (1).PNG AM is a key component of the digital restorative process. It provides a bridge between the physical and the digital representation of patient data. Once the digital impression has been taken, it can be used anywhere in the restorative process in a variety of applications, such as production of surgical guides, investment patterns, try-in prostheses, temporary/provisional prostheses, denture moulds, and laboratory working models. 3D printed models have many applications in dentistry particularly in the world of thermoplastic appliances made via vacuum forming or direct press down of heated thermoformed materials such as bleaching trays, retainers, athletic mouth guards, orthodontic appliances and so on. These appliances were made in the past on gypsum models that were very fragile, only single use and inaccurate. We have left the ”Stone Ages” of gypsum for highly accurate, virtually unbreakable, multiple-use, 3D printed models. Some four years ago I began using a Stratasys Objet 30 printer in my office for everyday modelling using MED 690 polymer and MED 610, an FDA approved material to manufacture surgical guides. The world of surgical guides has undergone tremendous advances. Our surgical guide workflow is as follows: We take a Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) using Mobile Imaging Solutions, a service I developed that provides onsite imaging using the latest lowest radiation dose mobile system to produce the DICOM data that will be file merged with highly accurate STL files from an iTero Element intraoral scan. That data is merged using 3shape Implant Studio 2016 software. This creates a virtual planning platform to design the location of the implant restorations as well as precise location of the implant in bone. Further, we can design the immediate screw retained pre-made provisional restoration that will be placed at FIGURE 6 (1).jpg the time of implant placement with the surgical guide. AM is used to produce the highly accurate surgical guide in a 100% digital workflow. AM extends into everyday dentistry with orthodontics where mass customisation allows products such as Invisalign to manufacture aligners. We are now able to replicate the process in our office. Tooth movement can be easily performed virtually using in-house software to segment a series of stages, STL files are used to 3D print a physical model of each stage and on this physical model a thermoplastic appliance is created. These sequential clear plastic aligners are then used to create precise tooth movements. The future is bright for AM in everyday dentistry. The efficiencies and improved dental care afforded by technological advancements can only continue to improve the speed and quality of dental treatment. 3D printing enabled by intraoral digital scanning is the next paradigm shift, offering dentists, the opportunity to move beyond traditional methods into a new world of digital dentistry.

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What is a Public Register?

The “Find a Registered Dental Hygienist” function on the website (also known as the “public register”) is required by law, and offers profiles of all denta
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3D Printing in Orthodontics | Stratasys Digital Dental Workflow Solutions

For more information on Dental and Orthodontic 3D Printers click here http://goo.gl/Ph3aLf Orthodontic digitization and 3D printing have raised the level o
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Dental patients at risk from fake drills that could shatter in mouth

Dental patients at risk from fake drills that could shatter in mouth | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
The ‘extremely dangerous’ drills - which look identical to a reputable brand - were sold at knock-down prices on eBay. More than 700 counterfeit drills have been seiezed in the last four years in the UK.
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Sof-Lex™ Diamond Polishing System Technique Video

This video gives you a brief overview about the polishing process with 3M Sof-Lex spiral wheels.
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Dental Laboratory Association Informs Patients of Potential Lack of Regulation for Dental Restorations

Dental Laboratory Association Informs Patients of Potential Lack of Regulation for Dental Restorations | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
According to The Regulatory Side of Sleep Devices, the FDA regulates sleep device manufacturing labs yet other dental devices and restorations go unregulated. It is the responsibility of the dental lab and dentist to ensure regulatory compliance for the safety of the patient, but patients must also be aware of this issue and take health into their own hands.
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Stratasys Groundbreaking Multi-Color, Multi-Material 3D Printing Now Available for Larger Dental Labs Who Need Increased Throughput, Productivity | Business Wire

Stratasys Groundbreaking Multi-Color, Multi-Material 3D Printing Now Available for Larger Dental Labs Who Need Increased Throughput, Productivity | Business Wire | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), the 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions company, introduces the Objet500 Dental Selection 3D Printer for la
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3Shape H600™ 3D Scanner

3Shape H600™ 3D Scanner | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Ear impression scanner in a great condition. 1 Year old. Was used to scan 40 scans. High productivity ear impression scanner with unique Texture Scanning 3Shape's H600 ear impression scanner is...
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Cornerstone Dental Labs Offering Digital Design Services for Crowns - Press Release - Digital Journal

One of the benefits of working with Cornerstone Dental Labs over other dental implant companies is that they place a high emphasis on customer support and services. Another benefit is that dentists can be active in the design process. In fact, one of the things that make it possible for Cornerstone's technicians to communicate with their clients is because they utilize the 3Shape Communicate™. This machine allows their technicians to share information and discuss the design process online. Lastly, potential clients will be pleased to know that Cornerstone is also an authorized retailer of 3Shape's TRIOS, a scanner that dentists can place directly beside their patient to acquire 3D impressions.
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Scientists have managed to grow brand new teeth complete with roots using cells from human adult gum tissue

Scientists have managed to grow brand new teeth complete with roots using cells from human adult gum tissue | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Researchers mix cells from human adult gum tissue with tooth-inducing cells from mouse embryos to grow new hybrid teeth complete with roots.

 

Cells taken from adult human gums can be combined with cells from the molars of fetal mice to form teeth with viable roots, according to research published this week in the Journal of Dental Research. The method remains a long way from clinical use, but the findings represent a step toward the goal of growing bioengineered replacements for lost teeth.

 

Teeth develop when embryonic epithelial cells in the mouth combine with mesenchymal cells derived from the neural crest. Previous studies have shown that these cells can be combined in the lab to formal normal teeth, but the challenge was to find non-embryonic source of the cells that could be used in the clinic.

 

To test one such source, a team lead by King’s College London stem cell biologist Paul Sharpe extracted epithelial cells from the gums of adult humans, cultured them in the lab, and mixed them with mesenchymal tooth cells derived from embryonic mice. After a week, the researchers transplanted this mixture into the protective tissue around the kidneys of living mice, where some of the cells developed into hybrid human/mouse teeth containing dentine and enamel, and with growing roots.

 

The research showed that the epithelial cells from adult human gum tissue responded to tooth-inducing signals from the embryonic mouse tooth mesenchyme, making the gum cells a realistic source for clinical use, said Sharpe in a press release. He added that “the next major challenge is to identify a way to culture adult human mesenchymal cells to be tooth-inducing, as at the moment we can only make embryonic mesenchymal cells do this.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Alligator Stem Cells Offer Hope for Tooth Regeneration in Humans

Alligator Stem Cells Offer Hope for Tooth Regeneration in Humans | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Scientists discovered unique cellular and molecular mechanisms behind tooth renewal in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

 

Humans naturally only have two sets of teeth – baby teeth and adult teeth. Ultimately, we want to identify stem cells that can be used as a resource to stimulate tooth renewal in adult humans who have lost teeth. But, to do that, we must first understand how they renew in other animals and why they stop in people,” Prof Chuong said.

 

Whereas most vertebrates can replace teeth throughout their lives, human teeth are naturally replaced only once, despite the lingering presence of a band of epithelial tissue called the dental lamina, which is crucial to tooth development.

 

Because alligators have well-organized teeth with similar form and structure as mammalian teeth and are capable of lifelong tooth renewal, the team reasoned that they might serve as models for mammalian tooth replacement.

 

“Alligator teeth are implanted in sockets of the dental bone, like human teeth. They have 80 teeth, each of which can be replaced up to 50 times over their lifetime, making them the ideal model for comparison to human teeth,” explained study lead author Prof Ping Wu, also from the University of Southern California.

 

The team found that each alligator tooth is a complex unit of three components – a functional tooth, a replacement tooth, and the dental lamina – in different developmental stages. The tooth units are structured to enable a smooth transition from dislodgement of the functional, mature tooth to replacement with the new tooth. Identifying three developmental phases for each tooth unit, the researchers conclude that the alligator dental laminae contain what appear to be stem cells from which new replacement teeth develop.

 

“Stem cells divide more slowly than other cells,” said co-author Prof Randall Widelitz of the University of Southern California.

 

“The cells in the alligator’s dental lamina behaved like we would expect stem cells to behave. In the future, we hope to isolate those cells from the dental lamina to see whether we can use them to regenerate teeth in the lab.”

 

The team also intends to learn what molecular networks are involved in repetitive renewal and hope to apply the principles to regenerative medicine in the future.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Dental Mills | imes-icore CORiTEC 350i and CORiTEC 350i with Loader

For more information on Imes-Icore Dental Milling Machines visit https://goo.gl/3vP3IL With the CORiTEC 350i processing system, a novel machine concept ha
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Global Dental 3D Scanners Market Assessment & Forecast: 2016 - 2020

LONDON, Jan. 31, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The Asia-Pacific Dental 3D Scanners market is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 8.2% from 2016 to 2020 and in 2015 was valued at US$ 102.2 million, according to the new report "Global Dental 3D Scanners Market Assessment & Forecast 2016 - 2020." by SA-Business Research & Consulting Group. The Asian market is brimming with innovation potential with players such as Medit Corporation, Shining 3D Tech Co., Ltd and DOF Inc strongly competing against large North American and European players. Computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in dentistry has been around for more than two decades. The early endeavors for employing CAD/CAM in dentistry were time consuming and cumbersome and produced rudimentary results. The major challenges faced were technological limitations and the lack of high definition 3D capturing systems. As technology improved, the CAD/CAM systems began to find a place labside with varying degree of acceptance among dentists. It is only in recent years that 3D scanning and 3D printing are becoming profitable for dentists since they drastically reduce the number of steps and time consumed in preparing an implant for a patient. The 3D scanners are devices that use laser or structured light source to scan an object from multiple axes and reproduce the image on a computer system. Together, this system is also known as computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided manufacturing (CAM). Conventional systems were expensive, large and cumbersome for dentists to operate while managing patients as well. However, with further advancement of technology both in terms of hardware and software, miniaturization of devices, improvement in the level of imaging resolution will provide clearer images to dentists. This will help dentists and patients to decide on the best route of treatment and increase comfort. With companies such as 3M ESPE now offering low cost intraoral 3D scanners and Asian players such as Medit and Shining 3D tech anticipated to enter the intraoral market, this segment is poised to embark on a dynamic and competitive phase. The report covers six geographical regions of North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle-East and Africa. It also covers over 40 key vendors in the space of four device types; intraoral 3D scanners, desktop or laboratory 3D scanners, hand held 3D scanners and cone beam CT 3D scanners.
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3D Printing in Dentistry

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3D printing is a revolutionary technique in which customized manufacturing of any design can be done with the help of CAD design, that is then sent to specific devices called 3D printers which lay down material layer by layer and build a 3 dimensional product. This is also called as additional manufacturing and has almost no wastage and complex designs can be accurately made which were not possible earlier. Today, millions of invisible (transparent) orthodontic braces, study models, dental crowns, bridges, etc. are being made with the help of 3D printing. These are being produced with the help of game changing industrial 3D printers which cost over a million US dollars. Earlier, conventional dental labs making artificial teeth relied on mainly skilled technicians who would work manually with wax patterns and traditional casting methods. This process is very old, intensive in labor, tricky, and not a hundred percent accurate. This is where the contribution of 3D printing comes into play. With rapid prototyping and 3D printing, dental implants, crowns and surgeries are becoming more accurate and less of a hassle for both doctors and patients. Printed jawbones and dental implants are set to lead the growth in commercial 3-D printing, with the sector expected to expand over 500 percent in the next 10 years, according to a new report. The dental sector is on the verge of a mass uptake of the technology and represents a clear growth area for 3-D printing, according to tech research firm IDTechEx. A study predicts that in the future, a dentist would be able to print you a newly 3D printed artificial one in 6.5 minutes and this can be anti-bacterial too. The dental and medical 3-D printing sector is expected to grow by around 515 percent to $868 million by 2025, up from its current value of $141 million. According to SmarTech report the value of 3D printing dental market is already worth $780 million in revenues, as metal sub-structures for crowns and bridges in cobalt chromium, tooling for production of clear aligners, wax casting molds for restorations, and dental models are being produced in high volume by dental laboratories worldwide. Looking into the future for dentistry, the report predicts that because of the drastic improvement over existing traditional methods that 3D printing technology provides, its penetration in specific applications will reach more than 60 percent of overall dental production in the next ten years, and perhaps even higher in certain areas such as dental modeling.

WRITTEN BY - Dr K Kothari
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GlareSmile: brush your teeth the right way, in 10 seconds

GlareSmile is raising funds for GlareSmile: brush your teeth the right way, in 10 seconds on Kickstarter!

The first toothbrush that automatically ensures the correct brushing technique in just 10 seconds, saving time, improving oral health.
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Dental Laboratory Association Announces Campaign to Inform Dentists of Potential Lack of Regulation for Restorations

Dental Laboratory Association Announces Campaign to Inform Dentists of Potential Lack of Regulation for Restorations | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
According to The Regulatory Side of Sleep Devices, the FDA regulates sleep device manufacturing labs yet other dental devices and restorations go unregulated. The National Association of Dental Laboratories announced
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Digitization is changing the face of dental care - Refresh Buffalo Blog

Digitization is changing the face of dental care - Refresh Buffalo Blog | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Parents who worry that their kids play too many video games, and fear they’ll end up living in a basement bedroom forever, may want to know about Evolution Dental Science in Cheektowaga. It turns out those computer geeks who get lost in “Call of Duty,” “Fallout” and other role-playing games tend to be very good at helping to build bridges,…
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The Global Dental Lasers Market to be Worth USD 236.4 Million by 2021, at a CAGR of 5.2% | news.sys-con.com

The Global Dental Lasers Market to be Worth USD 236.4 Million by 2021, at a CAGR of 5.2% | news.sys-con.com | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
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Smile! Meet the 3D printer churning out teeth, nerves and gums for dentists

Smile! Meet the 3D printer churning out teeth, nerves and gums for dentists | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it

Will.i.am thinks we will be 3D printing human beings in the future, although his comments were met with skepticism from biology experts. Perhaps a better starting point would be teeth.

That’s the sole purpose of a new device called the Objet260 Dental Selection, unveiled this month by 3D printing firm Stratasys.

However, the realistic teeth, gums and nerves that it prints out aren’t destined for the insides of people’s mouths any time soon: instead, they’re models for dental specialists to poke, prod and show to patients when explaining procedures.

Stratasys sees the new printer as “closing the loop in digital dentistry” in the way it takes a digital file produced by an intra-oral scanner used by a dentist and turns it into a “colour, multi-texture dental model”.

The printer uses the company’s own PolyJet dental materials, promising “life-like gum textures” and various shades of colour in the resulting models.

The creation of teeth, gum and nerve models is just one example of the emerging uses of 3D printing technology in the medical sector. Among the more ambitious aims is the ability to print types of human tissue, and ultimately entire organs.

In August 2014, research firm IDTechEx claimed that the dental and medical market for 3D printers will expand to $867m (£523m) by 2025, although it suggested that if “bio-printing” pieces of skin, liver and kidney becomes a commercial reality, the market could be several times that size.

Overall, research firm Gartner expects 2.3m 3D printers to be sold in 2018, with more than three quarters of the 3D printing market’s revenue coming from industrial use, rather than people buying these devices for their homes.

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3D printed teeth that helps you keep your mouth bacteria-free! | biotechin.asia

3D printed teeth that helps you keep your mouth bacteria-free! | biotechin.asia | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
As additive manufacturing technology and 3D printing undergo rapid advances, newer and more exciting applications are coming to the fore. 3D printing in the dental market is not new. By combining CAD/CAM design, oral scanning and 3D printing - dental labs have been able to rapidly and accurately produce crowns, bridges, stone models and a range…
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To boost job prospects, younger Americans seek dentures

To boost job prospects, younger Americans seek dentures | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Dentures are not just for the elderly; they help younger adults get and keep jobs.

 

Some areas that top the nation for unemployment also fare worst in a health measure that can keep people from getting jobs — missing teeth.

West Virginia is the starkest example. Not only did it have the highest jobless rate in June, but it also holds the dubious distinction of having the most working-age adults who have lost six or more teeth at 23%.

In fact, while most people associate lost teeth and dentures with the elderly, nearly one in five working-age adults in some Southern and Appalachian states have lost at least that many teeth, according to statistics from the Commonwealth Fund. And a study published last week in the journal Health Affairs showed 45 million American face dental care shortages, especially in rural areas. The need has spurred oral care professionals to respond with new ways to make dentures quickly and inexpensively to help those patients get back into the workforce.

Mary Deel, a 52-year-old former nursing home worker from Appalachian Virginia, saw the benefits recently when she received a free, full set of dentures made in an hour at a Remote Area Medical clinic in Wise, Va.

Without teeth, she didn't smile much and didn't want anyone to take her picture. But as soon as the dentures were fitted into her mouth, she showed them off with a proud grin in photos with dentists and technicians, saying "I'm happy…very happy."

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Take Your Dental Business to the Next Generation! | Stratasys 3D Printing - YouTube

Dentists around the world are now embracing next generation 3D Printing to produce durable, accurate dental models. It's known as rapid manufacturing! In thi...
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Objet 3D Printer Wins ‘Best of the Best’ from Dental Lab Products Magazine

Objet 3D Printer Wins ‘Best of the Best’ from Dental Lab Products Magazine | Dental Manufacturing | Scoop.it
The Objet Eden260V was recently nominated the 'Readers Choice' Top Product by subscribers to Dental Lab Products Magazine.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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