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European civil rights groups join forces to defend net neutrality | NetworkWorld.com

European civil rights groups join forces to defend net neutrality | NetworkWorld.com | Democracy Matters | Scoop.it

European Internet users could risk being charged extra money for accessing online services like Facebook, Wikipedia, YouTube, Skype and Whatsapp if a European draft regulation on net neutrality isn't amended before March, European civil rights groups warned Tuesday.

 

Civil rights groups EDRi (European Digital Rights), the German Digitale Gesellschaft, the French La Quadrature du Net, the Austrian Initiative fA1/4r Netzfreiheit as well as the Brussels based Access Now group together launched a campaign called SaveTheInternet.eu aiming to amend or block the regulation.

 

The European Union is currently preparing a net neutrality law.

 

Net neutrality in principle means that all traffic on the internet is treated on an equal basis without regard to the type or origin of the content.

 

However, the European Commission's net neutrality proposal allows ISPs to charge extra for delivering "specialized services" -- and by not defining the term, could allow them apply the label to services such as Skype, YouTube and Whatsapp that compete with their own offerings, and charge customers to access them, the groups warned.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Anthony Carnesecca's insight:

This article highlights the crucial issue of network neutrality being debated across the globe in various governing bodies and court rooms.  This advocacy group is advocating and fighting for the right to a free net with access to all content from all users.

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Privacy groups ask FCC to rule that carriers cannot share phone records | NetworkWorld.com

Privacy groups ask FCC to rule that carriers cannot share phone records | NetworkWorld.com | Democracy Matters | Scoop.it

Privacy groups have asked the U.S. FCC to declare that even "anonymized" phone records have to be protected under a privacy rule that restricts carriers from sharing customers' information without their consent.

 

The petition filed before the Federal Communications Commission comes in the wake of reports that U.S. carriers like Verizon and AT&T were sharing phone records in bulk with the U.S. government.

 

The groups cite research to state that even so-called anonymized call records have sufficient information to link back to specific individuals. "When a carrier purges individual identities from a set of call records but leaves individual characteristics (such as incoming and outgoing calls, call times, and call durations) intact, the records are not anonymous at all; they are pseudonymous," according to their petition filed Wednesday before the FCC.

 

Section 222 of the Communications Act instructs carriers that, with few exceptions, they have to get customers' consent before they can share "customer proprietary network information," also referred to as CPNI, wrote Laura Moy, staff attorney at Public Knowledge, one of the groups filing the petition, in a blog post.

 

The groups found that all four major mobile carriers - AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon - have privacy policies that suggest that they consider it okay to sell or share the records. "We don't know whether or not they actually are selling CPNI, but the fact that they think they can is alarming," Moy wrote.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Anthony Carnesecca's insight:

This article focuses on certain groups that want the FCC to prevent companies from taking information from consumers without their knowledge or consent.

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Animal advocacy groups step up after attacks on animals - WWL

Animal advocacy groups step up after attacks on animals - WWL | Democracy Matters | Scoop.it
WWL
Animal advocacy groups step up after attacks on animals
WWL
NEW ORLEANS -- Animal advocacy groups are stepping in to help in neighborhoods where cat owners are finding their pets shot. It is unclear why it is happening and who is doing it.
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This animal rights group is utilizing the news media to bring attention to the issue of animal abuse within the southern states.

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Can the Internet and Social Media Help the Development of Healthcare?

Can the Internet and Social Media Help the Development of Healthcare? | Democracy Matters | Scoop.it

In a world frantically scrambling to adapt to the changing digital landscape, how has healthcare fared? Has the Internet and social media helped or hindered its development? Should the public turn to the Internet for medical advice? I enlisted the help of some leading voices in the field to unravel these questions and shed some much needed light on the topic.

 

Information technologies have already prompted a massive shift in the way medical information is accessed, with its capacity to transfer important knowledge from health professionals to the wider public. Social media, in particular, is a perfect vehicle for this.

As the tentacles of social media permeate into everyday life, doctors and healthcare organisations alike can leverage this power to circulate valuable information about health problems as well as self-care and prevention techniques.

 

As Lee Aase, Director at Mayo Clinic Social Media, confirms:

“By engaging in public, knowledgeable professionals can offer help and insights on a scale that was previously impossible. And by bringing their science-based perspective they can hopefully counter some of the bad information that has been so harmful to public health”


“The Journal of Internet Medical Research have suggested that 60% of adults used the internet to find health information”

It’s exactly this ‘bad information’ that makes searching online for medical advice fraught with dangers. For the more Internet savvy, this may not pose a problem, but, for the less educated, and the elderly, finding credible information on the web may be a troublesome task.

The reality is that anyone can publish on the internet, regardless of quality, which means that you could be confronted with information that is conflicting, confusing, or quite simply wrong.

 

From a runny nose to something more serious like a suspicious lump, people are heading to the web more and more; but, with more than 70,000 websites disseminating medical information, where should you visit?

 

According to Dr. Sarah Jarvis, clinical consultant at Patient.co.uk, your doctor can advise you on trusted sites to visit. Here in the UK, sites which have been awarded The Information Standard by the NHS, are particularly useful as medical resources:

 

"Patient.co.uk is fully accredited, and all the articles on the site are written by GPs, for GPs and their patients. They also provide full references to back up their content. Of the 11 million people who access the information onsite every month, almost a million are GPs and practice nurses – a ringing endorsement of the quality of the information."


However, can even the most reputable sites compare to the value of a face-to-face appointment with your GP? Dr. Leana Wen, physician and author of When Doctor’s Don’t Listen believes that the Internet should only be used to accompany a visit to the doctors:

"Don't use the Internet to make your diagnosis, but rather use it to formulate better questions to ask your doctor. Internet search engines can't replace seeing your doctor, because symptoms alone don't make your diagnosis--your history and physical exam do."

 

This is true; the benefits of a physical diagnosis cannot be completely replaced by a search online. However, the Internet and social media have other abilities that can improve healthcare, namely it’s capacity to bring patients with similar diseases together. Through Twitter chats and Facebook groups, like-minded patients can connect with one another for mutual support and knowledge sharing. Introducing trained medical professionals into these conversations will undoubtedly make these discussions more helpful.

 

“Doctors should always exercise caution when using Twitter as it can often lead to a conflict of interest, but as long as it’s used in responsible manner, Twitter can be the perfect platform to educate the public on a wide range of health issues.”Healthexpress Chief medical Advisor, Dr. Hilary Jones


Facebook is particularly good at grouping patients together.

In one simple click, you can become an active member of a community alongside others with similar interests.

These groups supply valuable opportunities to talk to one another while offering important information on breakthrough studies, news and advice for a specific condition, all of which will feature on a daily newsfeed.

 

A perfect example of a successful social media campaign can be observed with Diabetes.co.uk, a community website which has successfully built a global network to help people with diabetes worldwide. As well as promoting awareness for Diabetes, their social media platforms unite people with similar worries so they can share their stories and seek support.

 

In fact, the benefits of an extended support network on a persons health has been confirmed by several studies. Researchers from California carried out a large-scale study in 1979, which concluded that people with relatively low levels of social interaction died earlier than those with strong social networks.

 

By using social media, people are more likely to partake in social interaction and support. The possibilities have moved beyond the restraints of face-to-face contacts to an unlimited pool of people with shared interests and concerns.

As Medical Expert for NBC and regular on air guest for Fox News, Dr. Kevin Campbell testifies,

"Support groups are extremely valuable for patients--social media allows for patients from geographically diverse regions to interact in real time without even leaving their own homes."

“Social media connects. Social Media informs both patients and doctors. It enhances knowledge. It facilities communication. In healthcare, is there anything more powerful than knowledge and human connection?”Dr.John Mandrola, cardiologist

As well as improving doctor/patient relationships, Dr. Campbell believes that social media can develop relationships within doctors’ circles themselves. Doctors can now consult each other from anywhere in the world, meaning that ideas can be more easily disseminated, thus improving research and patient care.

 

However, many healthcare institutions are worried that the use of social media by their doctors may compromise patient privacy while threatening a doctor’s professional reputations. This has lead to many organisations devising their own guidelines for their doctors. Dr. John Mandrola, a cardiac electro physiologist and regular Twitter user, has created his own ‘Rules for Doctors on Social Media.’

 

There may be some risks to consider when integrating social media into a healthcare model, but the overwhelming power of social media as a tool to educate and distribute medical information cannot be ignored. If social media is to revolutionize healthcare and improve public health on a global level, health professionals must be actively involved in the process to guarantee that the information is completely reliable. With a community of doctors and specialists already discussing ethical problems and how to overcome these obstacles, the future of social media in healthcare is in good hands.



Read more: http://www.healthexpress.co.uk/blog/general-health/internet-social-media-healthcare.html?7144277=1#ixzz2qet0Nzw1 
Follow us: @healthexpress on Twitter


Via Plus91
Anthony Carnesecca's insight:

This article brings up an interesting point about whether vital areas of our lives, such as medicine and health, should fully utilize social media platforms to advocate and push for consumers to act in certain ways.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 23, 2014 3:09 AM

Internet ,Social Media and  the Development of Healthcare

Blanca Usoz's curator insight, January 23, 2014 4:13 AM

Redes sociales que conectan en salud

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Freedom of speech debate sparked by draft law to ban use of 'Nazi ...

Freedom of speech debate sparked by draft law to ban use of 'Nazi ... | Democracy Matters | Scoop.it
Bill would impose fine and jail sentence on anyone using the word other than in certain educational or artistic contexts.
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This article does not necessarily pertain to a certian group, but I thought it was a fascinating free speech issue.  It prevents certain citizens from displaying certain items in public.

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European civil rights groups join forces to defend net neutrality | NetworkWorld.com

European civil rights groups join forces to defend net neutrality | NetworkWorld.com | Democracy Matters | Scoop.it

European Internet users could risk being charged extra money for accessing online services like Facebook, Wikipedia, YouTube, Skype and Whatsapp if a European draft regulation on net neutrality isn't amended before March, European civil rights groups warned Tuesday.

 

Civil rights groups EDRi (European Digital Rights), the German Digitale Gesellschaft, the French La Quadrature du Net, the Austrian Initiative fA1/4r Netzfreiheit as well as the Brussels based Access Now group together launched a campaign called SaveTheInternet.eu aiming to amend or block the regulation.

 

The European Union is currently preparing a net neutrality law.

 

Net neutrality in principle means that all traffic on the internet is treated on an equal basis without regard to the type or origin of the content.

 

However, the European Commission's net neutrality proposal allows ISPs to charge extra for delivering "specialized services" -- and by not defining the term, could allow them apply the label to services such as Skype, YouTube and Whatsapp that compete with their own offerings, and charge customers to access them, the groups warned.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Anthony Carnesecca's insight:

This article highlights the crucial issue of network neutrality being debated across the globe in various governing bodies and court rooms.  This advocacy group is advocating and fighting for the right to a free net with access to all content from all users.

more...
No comment yet.
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Advocacy group calls for clearer seafood consumption guidelines - Los Angeles Times

Advocacy group calls for clearer seafood consumption guidelines - Los Angeles Times | Democracy Matters | Scoop.it
Advocacy group calls for clearer seafood consumption guidelines Los Angeles Times The advice to eat more seafood for a healthy heart might be familiar, but when consumers get to the fish counter, there are confusing questions galore: Which types...
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This article discusses an environmental group that hopes to make seafood labels more regulated and universally understandable for the common consumer in the stores.

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Pope to media: Slow down! - Politico (blog)

Pope to media: Slow down! - Politico (blog) | Democracy Matters | Scoop.it
Pope to media: Slow down! Politico (blog) In a nod to the increasingly fragmented niche media markets, Francis called on media consumers not to "barricade themselves behind sources of information which only confirm their own wishes and ideas, or...
Anthony Carnesecca's insight:

This article discusses the Vatican, more specifically the Pope, telling media conglomerates to stop continually releasing media.  He advocates for this action because he believes that it prevents people from experiencing the outside world beyond technology.

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Georgian lawmakers express concern about violence in Ukraine - Democracy & Freedom Watch

Georgian lawmakers express concern about violence in Ukraine - Democracy & Freedom Watch | Democracy Matters | Scoop.it
Democracy & Freedom Watch Georgian lawmakers express concern about violence in Ukraine Democracy & Freedom Watch Parliament expresses solidarity with the aspirations of the Ukrainian people to become a member of the European family, based on...
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This article focuses on the policymakers in Georgia, who are a very important group to consider in media advocacy, because they create and implement legislation regarding media.

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