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Democracy in Place and Space
Examining the Place and Space of Democratic and Anti-Democratic Action, Past, Present and Future
Curated by John Slifko
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Urban-Rural voting patterns

Nate Silver became about as big of a celebrity as a statistician can become during the election.  This little nugget is obviously an overgeneralization, but has some merit.  Where does this hold true and where is it false?  How come? 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 11, 2013 12:38 PM

Nate Silver became about as big of a celebrity as a statistician can become during the election (being called everything from a prophet to a witch).  This little nugget is obviously an overgeneralization, but it appears that is has enough substance to give it some serious consideration.  Where does this hold true and where is it false?  How come?   If it is true, why would this be true?

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The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt

The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt | Democracy in Place and Space | Scoop.it
The Atlantic CitiesThe Real Boundaries of the Bible BeltThe Atlantic CitiesReligion in America has an unmistakable geographic dimension.

 

We often hear people in the deep South describe there state as the buckle in the Bible Belt.  This map of religiousity in the United States shows a clear Bible Belt with other interesting patterns (with some pertinent political ramifications in an election year). 


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Public Space, Private Rules: The Legal Netherworld of Occupy Wall Street

Public Space, Private Rules: The Legal Netherworld of Occupy Wall Street | Democracy in Place and Space | Scoop.it
Had the protest begun almost anywhere else in New York City, it almost certainly would have been shut down far sooner.

 

While I'm sure we have readers across the political spectrum, the spatial component to this movement is undeniably a "teaching moment."  Occupy symbolically laden space to strengthen your discursive case?  Classic strategy (think Tiananmen Square and Tahrir Square for starters).  The actual place occupied is privately owned, and ironically can therefore function as a public place of protest more effectively.  What will you discuss?  


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Freedom of the Press

Freedom of the Press | Democracy in Place and Space | Scoop.it

"Freedom House has been at the forefront in monitoring threats to media independence since 1980. A free press plays a key role in sustaining and monitoring a healthy democracy, as well as in contributing to greater accountability, good government, and economic development. Most importantly, restrictions on media are often an early indicator that governments intend to assault other democratic institutions." 


This interactive map shows some intriguing spatial patterns about the freedom of press internationally.  What other patterns to you see in matching up with the most free presses in the world (in green)?  How does a free (or not free press) influence the cultural and political values of a country? 


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2008 Election Maps

2008 Election Maps | Democracy in Place and Space | Scoop.it

As the election year is ramping up, now is a good time to introduce electoral geography (since there are millions of dollars been spent of this type of analysis).  Displayed is the county map of the 2008 presidential election (McCain=red, Obama=blue).  What are the geographic and demographic characteristics of the 2008 voting base of both the Republican and Democratic parties?  This is also a great map to discuss how to interpret maps--how could this map be misleading?  What additional information is needed to contextualize this data?  Follow the link for additional maps that provide attempt to visualize that context.    


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 12, 2013 10:05 AM

I really enjoyed this article, it was insctieful interesting and had very informitive visual aids. It was very interesting to see all the differnt maps prtayted thoughout the artile. I found that the infomation that they were describing was alot of things I had heard before, but the added affect of the visual aids were able to give me a deeper understading. It also really brings up some key geogragaphical regaions and shows how even thouhg a state might be blue there are still areas(towns, countis) with in the sate that are primarly red party. When this election was going on it sure seemed like it was goiing to be neck and neck, but clearly on election day bule took over .

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 10:01 AM

It is amazing how a map can throw people off. It looks like McCain was winning but at the end Obama has won because more people have voted for him than his competitor. Also in the shaded blue area are much more populated then the areas in red because the red area are surrounded by woods and also the red area is like the suburbs of the city. It is very different how maps are portrayed and how misleading they can be. Never depend on one source find as many as you can to make your interpretations   

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 7:42 AM

Electoral college maps can sometimes trick you because it looks like McCain won but although most of mid west is republican there isnt a large population so they dont get as many votes as states with bigger populations like California, New York, Texas, Florida, etc.