Democracy in Place and Space
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Democracy in Place and Space
Examining the Place and Space of Democratic and Anti-Democratic Action, Past, Present and Future
Curated by John Slifko
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On How to Read a (Good) Map

On How to Read a (Good) Map | Democracy in Place and Space | Scoop.it

"Just as you shouldn’t trust everything you read or see on television, you should never blindly trust information just because it is on a map. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. Just as there are no unbiased arguments, there are no unbiased maps."


Via Seth Dixon
John Slifko's insight:

Map skills are vital in the study of democratic place and space. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 23, 2013 12:12 PM

This is a really good article that explores the idea of how to critically read maps. It gives good guidelines, techniques and questions to ask when assessing the positionality of the map.  If you are looking for a video for a younger audience to teach this same principle, see this clip.


Tags: mapping, perspective.

YEC Geo's curator insight, November 24, 2013 4:44 PM

Good advice.

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, November 26, 2013 1:09 AM

Exercise 14 :

 

Read the news and answer the questions:

 

a.What is the news talking about ?

b. There are two maps.Maps that is down has these questions ( Answer them ) :

Who made the map?What is the purpose of the map? That is, what is the map attempting to communicate?Who is the intended audience? (It is important to remember that the map may not have been designed for you, but a more specialized audience.)Does the map effectively achieve its communication goals? Does it present an interesting story or argument?

c.Sum up the news ( five sentences in english )

d.Choose another map ( of Internert  if you want ) and answer the questions 1,2,3 i 4. Add the map.

 

Send by moodle.Good luck¡

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Spatial History Project

Spatial History Project | Democracy in Place and Space | Scoop.it

The Spatial History Project at Stanford puts together some fantastic geovisualization that is an awesome site that allows you or your kids to spatial and temporally the diffusion of Nazi concentration camps.  It has some clickable 'GIS-like' layers to help students contextualize the data and to make some important interdisciplinary connections.  Originally spotted on http://ushistoryeducatorblog.blogspot.com/


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Historypin

This is a video introduction to www.historypin.com which might just prove to be an very useful and important project.  It's historical geography powered by colloborative mapping that is infused with social media dynamics.  Backed by Google, they are geotagging old photos to recreate the historical geographies of all places and comparing them with current streetview images.  You can search by topic, place or date...this has the potential to be very big.   


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4995songs's comment, November 16, 2011 4:13 PM
Absolutely brilliant! The possibilities that this offers are staggering. If museums, galleries, and archives all got on board with this, they could create an incredible database that would allow teachers to add so much more depth to their lessons. I feel like having a visual timeline paired with geographic references in this capacity would give students (and everyone else!) a stronger understanding of how deeply history and geography are connected.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 16, 2011 6:40 PM
Agreed, this is conceptually amazing...but what a vast undertaking. I'm half-tempted to upload some pictures but I know that I've got too many pet projects at the moment and think that this one has the potential to overwhelm me time-wise.
GIS student's comment, November 17, 2011 3:37 PM
Awesome site! As an aspiring teacher, this website can be great for then and now projects. When explaining different eras or time periods this not only shows where certain things took place, but what they looked like as well. Definitely something that will become more popular in the social media aspect of society. Definitely a site I can spend hours on.
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How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines

How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines | Democracy in Place and Space | Scoop.it
Volunteers across the world are building the digital infrastructure for the organization's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:28 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  Can you join in and help?


Tags: disasters, mappingPhilippines, STEM.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 13, 2013 3:32 PM

online maps are being used to help locate the best way possible to help transport food and resources to those most in need. They van locate bridges and the world is pulling together with tehcnolgy and accurate maps to help the  American red Cross maximize in time and manpower. It seems that after Hurricane Katrina and the Earthquakes in Haiti and Japan, We have been improving our strategies for how to best help people around the globe come together put our time energy and resources together to best help people whose lives have been devasted and crushed by the forces of mother nature.

 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:14 PM

Having a map of the current landscape, after the typhoon will speed up relief and rescue efforts by showing areas to land and set up help stations. The digital world is immediate now and this will change how organizations such as the Red Cross provide relief to suffering people.

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Migration in America - Forbes

Migration in America - Forbes | Democracy in Place and Space | Scoop.it
More people left Phoenix in 2009 than came. The map above visualizes moves to and from Phoenix; counties that took more migrants than they sent are linked with red lines. Counties that sent more migrants than they took are linked with blue lines.

 

I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications. 


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Rachael Johns's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:21 AM

In this day and age we see more people migrating then staying. People move for numerous things, a trend that causes a lot of migration is when people retire they move to southern Florida. They get tons of sun rays and meet a lot of people their age there. Another reason people migrate is for jobs. If their job tells them they have to move across state they do which causes more migration. ~R.J~

AmandaWilhiteee's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

The map is what originally attracted me to this article, but I must admit that the actual article was very interesting. Lots of the moves were from Phoenix, Arizona. Why people moved from Phoenix was not information that was disclosed in the article, but because of that, it made me wonder and want to learn more about this topic. AW :)

Nolan Walters's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:30 AM

I've seen something like this before.  More people leaving a location than entering it.  Something may have caused them to move, Push and Pull factors are both in this.  Job opportunities or the extreme heat of Phoenix may have caused them to leave.  It shows that most people went to the Northeast, where it is cooler and has more people.