defence technology
357 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Lee Kok Thong
onto defence technology
Scoop.it!

Thales remporte un nouveau contrat de support de missiles Crotale en Arabie saoudite

Thales remporte un nouveau contrat de support de missiles Crotale en Arabie saoudite | defence technology | Scoop.it
L'Arabie saoudite a confié un nouveau contrat de support des missiles de défense aérienne Crotale à Thales, selon nos informations.
more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Digital Transformation of Businesses
Scoop.it!

Gartner says #AI #AR #VR #IOT #3dprinting Will Drive Digital Business Into the Next Decade

Gartner says #AI #AR #VR #IOT #3dprinting Will Drive Digital Business Into the Next Decade | defence technology | Scoop.it

The emerging technologies on the Gartner Inc. Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2017 reveal three distinct megatrends that will enable businesses to survive and thrive in the digital economy over the next five to 10 years. Artificial intelligence (AI) everywhere, transparently immersive experiences and digital platforms are the trends that will provide unrivaled intelligence, create profoundly new experiences and offer platforms that allow organizations to connect with new business ecosystems.


Via Farid Mheir
more...
Farid Mheir's curator insight, September 22, 6:58 AM

WHY IT MATTERS

No surprise in this list but the hype cycle is always a great tool to visualize and spark strategy discussions around emerging technologies.

Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from AI -Artificial Intelligence
Scoop.it!

Facebook wants to use artificial intelligence to block terrorists online

Facebook wants to use artificial intelligence to block terrorists online | defence technology | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence is being developed to analyze written text to block terror-related content.

Via InvestorIdeas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

How to keep buildings cool without using electricity or power

How to keep buildings cool without using electricity or power | defence technology | Scoop.it

6% of the electricity generated in America is used to power air-conditioning systems that cool homes and offices. As countries such as Brazil, China and India grow richer, they will surely do likewise. Not only is that expensive for customers, it also raises emissions of greenhouse gases in the form both of carbon dioxide from burning power-station fuel and of the hydrofluorocarbons air conditioners use as refrigerants.

 

As they describe in a paper in this week’s Science, Ronggui Yang and Xiaobo Yin of the University of Colorado, in Boulder, have a possible alternative to all this. They have invented a film that can cool buildings without the use of refrigerants and, remarkably, without drawing any power to do so. Better yet, this film can be made using standard roll-to-roll manufacturing methods at a cost of around 50 cents a square meter.

 

The new film works by a process called radiative cooling. This takes advantage of that fact that Earth’s atmosphere allows certain wavelengths of heat-carrying infrared radiation to escape into space unimpeded. Convert unwanted heat into infrared of the correct wavelength, then, and you can dump it into the cosmos with no come back.

 

Dr Yang and Dr Yin are not the first to try to cool buildings in this way. Shanhui Fan and his colleagues at Stanford University, in California, demonstrated a device that used the principle in 2014. Their material, though, consisted of seven alternating layers of hafnium dioxide and silicon dioxide of varying thicknesses, laid onto a wafer made of silicon. This would be difficult and expensive to manufacture in bulk.

 

 Dr Yang’s and Dr Yin’s film, by contrast, was made of polymethylpentene, a commercially available, transparent plastic sold under the brand name TPX. Into this they mixed tiny glass beads. They then drew the result out into sheets about 50 millionths of a metre (microns) thick, and silvered those sheets on one side. When laid out on a roof, the silver side is underneath. Incident sunlight is thus reflected back through the plastic, which stops it heating the building below.

 

Preventing something warming up is not, though, the same as cooling it. The key to doing this is the glass beads. Temperature maintenance is not a static process. All objects both absorb and emit heat all the time, and the emissions are generally in the form of infrared radiation. In the case of the beads, the wavelength of this radiation is determined by their diameter. Handily, those with a diameter of about eight microns emit predominantly at wavelengths which pass straight through the infrared “window” in the atmosphere. Since the source of the heat that turns into this infrared is, in part, the building below, the effect is to cool the building.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lee Kok Thong
Scoop.it!

Futurethink: Is Busywork Holding Your #Career Back? #smartcreatives

Futurethink: Is Busywork Holding Your #Career Back? #smartcreatives | defence technology | Scoop.it

Sixty-one percent of Americans today say they don’t have enough time to do the things they want to do. But often what’s keeping us so busy isn’t that important. “Most of us have no problem with being busy, but we’re often busy on the wrong things,” says Angie Morgan, coauthor of Spark: How to Lead…

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lee Kok Thong
Scoop.it!

Rethinking Design Thinking |

Rethinking Design Thinking | | defence technology | Scoop.it

Design Thinking has become one of the most visible and promising innovation movements in recent history, yet all design thinking is not the same, especially in practice. The current proliferation of a one-size-fits-all approach is not only ineffective, it could ultimately doom its future. We see this all the time: workshops filled with post-it notes…

more...
William Smith's curator insight, February 18, 2:21 PM
Share your insight
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from defence technology
Scoop.it!

'DarkLight' enables visible light communication in the dark

'DarkLight' enables visible light communication in the dark | defence technology | Scoop.it

With the rise in wearables such as smartwatches and fitness trackers that rely on smart sensors, and the continued popularity of smartphones, smart devices are taking our country by storm. Wireless data for such devices is typically beamed through Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, yet, the new wireless communication technology of "visible light communication (VLC)," has emerged as a new option albeit with limitations due to the challenges it faces in practice, such as being easily blocked or not being able to sustain transmission when light is off. Through a new Dartmouth project called "DarkLight," researchers have developed and demonstrated for the first-time, how visible light can be used to transmit data even when the light appears dark or off. DarkLight provides a new communication primitive similar to infrared communication, however, it exploits the LED lights already around us rather than needing additional infrared emitters.

 

The study, ""The DarkLight Rises: Visible Light Communication in the Dark," will be presented at "MobiCom 2016: The 22nd Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking" on October 4 at 10:40 a.m., by Dartmouth co-author Zhao Tian, the lead Ph.D. student for the project. Demos of Darklight will be held later that day from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., as part of the conference's demo/poster session.

 

Through DarkLight, light-based communication is sustained even when LEDs emit extremely low luminance, by encoding data into ultra-short, imperceptible light pulses by using off-the-shelf, low-cost LEDs ($7 each) and photodiodes ($6-8 each), semiconductor devices that convert light into a current. In order for the DarkLight prototype to efficiently generate and reliably detect ultra-short light pulses, Dartmouth researchers developed a holistic solution to meet challenges regarding circuit designs, data encoding/decoding schemes, and DarkLight networking. The current DarkLight prototype supports 1.6-Kbps data rate at 1.8-m distance.

 

DarkLight defies the long-standing assumption that visible light communication requires a visible light beam to shine. For end users/consumers, this means that visible light can be reused in many scenarios that were never considered possible until now. DarkLight offers new capabilities in the areas of visible light communication and sensing:

For visible light communication, if you don't want your lights on, such as during a sunny day or when you go out or leave your home, DarkLight could serve as a special mode that your ceiling LED lights switch to, so that the light bulbs can still beam data to smart devices (e.g., smart sensors, smartphones) in the environment.LEDs and light sensors are common on smartphones. With DarkLight, data could be transmitted by using your phone's flashlight to another phone in proximity, without shining a light beam. The technology offers one more alternative for secure communication, since visible light is directional and degrades fast over distance.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Lee Kok Thong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Innovative technique for shaping light could solve bandwidth crunch

Innovative technique for shaping light could solve bandwidth crunch | defence technology | Scoop.it

As data demands continue to grow, scientists predict that it's only a matter of time before today's telecommunication networks reach capacity unless new technologies are developed for transporting data. A new technique could help avert this bandwidth crunch by allowing light-based optical networks to carry more than one hundred times more data than is possible with current technologies.

 

Laser light comes in many different shapes, or spatial modes. However, today's optical networks use just one spatial mode to carry information, limiting the amount of data that can be transmitted at one time. Researchers led by Andrew Forbes, a professor at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa, developed a technique known as spatial multiplexing that reshapes a laser beam into many spatial modes that can each carry information.

 

In a paper presented at the OSA Laser Congress in Boston, the researchers demonstrate optical communication with more than 100 spatial modes by combining their new spatial multiplexing approach with wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), which uses different wavelengths of light to carry information.

 

"We created 35 spatial modes encoded in three different wavelengths, producing 105 total modes," said Carmelo Rosales-Guzmán, research fellow and first author of the paper. "Our new method might serve as the basis for future communication technologies."

 

The researchers demonstrated that their technique can transmit data with 98 percent efficiency in a laboratory free-space optical network, which uses light to transmit information over the air. The scientists say the approach should also work in optical fibers, the basis for fiber-optic communications.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

'DarkLight' enables visible light communication in the dark

'DarkLight' enables visible light communication in the dark | defence technology | Scoop.it

With the rise in wearables such as smartwatches and fitness trackers that rely on smart sensors, and the continued popularity of smartphones, smart devices are taking our country by storm. Wireless data for such devices is typically beamed through Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, yet, the new wireless communication technology of "visible light communication (VLC)," has emerged as a new option albeit with limitations due to the challenges it faces in practice, such as being easily blocked or not being able to sustain transmission when light is off. Through a new Dartmouth project called "DarkLight," researchers have developed and demonstrated for the first-time, how visible light can be used to transmit data even when the light appears dark or off. DarkLight provides a new communication primitive similar to infrared communication, however, it exploits the LED lights already around us rather than needing additional infrared emitters.

 

The study, ""The DarkLight Rises: Visible Light Communication in the Dark," will be presented at "MobiCom 2016: The 22nd Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking" on October 4 at 10:40 a.m., by Dartmouth co-author Zhao Tian, the lead Ph.D. student for the project. Demos of Darklight will be held later that day from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., as part of the conference's demo/poster session.

 

Through DarkLight, light-based communication is sustained even when LEDs emit extremely low luminance, by encoding data into ultra-short, imperceptible light pulses by using off-the-shelf, low-cost LEDs ($7 each) and photodiodes ($6-8 each), semiconductor devices that convert light into a current. In order for the DarkLight prototype to efficiently generate and reliably detect ultra-short light pulses, Dartmouth researchers developed a holistic solution to meet challenges regarding circuit designs, data encoding/decoding schemes, and DarkLight networking. The current DarkLight prototype supports 1.6-Kbps data rate at 1.8-m distance.

 

DarkLight defies the long-standing assumption that visible light communication requires a visible light beam to shine. For end users/consumers, this means that visible light can be reused in many scenarios that were never considered possible until now. DarkLight offers new capabilities in the areas of visible light communication and sensing:

For visible light communication, if you don't want your lights on, such as during a sunny day or when you go out or leave your home, DarkLight could serve as a special mode that your ceiling LED lights switch to, so that the light bulbs can still beam data to smart devices (e.g., smart sensors, smartphones) in the environment.LEDs and light sensors are common on smartphones. With DarkLight, data could be transmitted by using your phone's flashlight to another phone in proximity, without shining a light beam. The technology offers one more alternative for secure communication, since visible light is directional and degrades fast over distance.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from defence technology
Scoop.it!

The Difference Between Data, Analytics, and Insights

The Difference Between Data, Analytics, and Insights | defence technology | Scoop.it
Learn the different between data, analytics, insights, and how they all work together to build strong app marketing campaigns.

Via Brian Steffens, Lee Kok Thong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from RJI links
Scoop.it!

The Difference Between Data, Analytics, and Insights

The Difference Between Data, Analytics, and Insights | defence technology | Scoop.it
Learn the different between data, analytics, insights, and how they all work together to build strong app marketing campaigns.

Via Brian Steffens
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Leadership and Management
Scoop.it!

9 Free Online Courses To Pump Up Your Big Data, Analytics Skills - InformationWeek

9 Free Online Courses To Pump Up Your Big Data, Analytics Skills - InformationWeek | defence technology | Scoop.it
Do you really need to go back to school and get another degree in order to establish yourself in a career as a data scientist? Maybe not.
Via Rami Kantari
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from i-HLS Israel Homeland Security
Scoop.it!

Cyber ​​Defense Is Essential To Assure Reliable Operation Of The Power Grid

Cyber ​​Defense Is Essential To Assure Reliable Operation Of The Power Grid | defence technology | Scoop.it

Daniel Ehrenreich Cyber defense solution for Distributed Management Systems – DMS used by electric utilities are operating without interfering with the control process and therefore can only utilize incremental upgrades. Adding cyber defense requires detailed analysis of the hardware, software a... http://bit.ly/1MbKzxF


Via i-hls Israel Homeland Security
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from i-HLS Israel Homeland Security
Scoop.it!

Military and C4I Technologies For Terrain Dominance

Military and C4I Technologies For Terrain Dominance | defence technology | Scoop.it

In today’s world, information is power – in any field. The more information we are receiving, the better our advantage and dominance in a certain field, the better our understanding of it and our capabilities in it. This hold true for any subject and any field of life, but perhaps even m... http://bit.ly/1QsdvTO


Via i-hls Israel Homeland Security
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from AI -Artificial Intelligence
Scoop.it!

3 Steps To Embedding Artificial Intelligence In Enterprise Applications

3 Steps To Embedding Artificial Intelligence In Enterprise Applications | defence technology | Scoop.it
Artificial Intelligence is evolving to become a core building block of contemporary applications. AI is all set to become as common as databases. It’s time for organizations to create the roadmap for building intelligent applications.

Via InvestorIdeas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Breakthrough Innovation
Scoop.it!

The Pentagon's Super-Fast Robot Now Runs on Its Own

The Pentagon's Super-Fast Robot Now Runs on Its Own | defence technology | Scoop.it
Last year, DARPA unveiled Cheetah: a robot that could run faster than Usain Bolt. Now, the same team has managed to create a version that doesn't need a power cord, making the electronic beast free to roam wherever it chooses.

Via António Antunes
more...
Scooped by Lee Kok Thong
Scoop.it!

20 Technology Predictions To Keep Your Eye On In 2017

20 Technology Predictions To Keep Your Eye On In 2017 | defence technology | Scoop.it

Will this be the year that artificial intelligence (AI) becomes so seamlessly connected in our lives as to trigger action at the speed of thought? Will you and everyone you know have a “digital twin”? And if so, which twin would you prefer to talk to? Will a new breed of cyberattack catch us off…

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

The AI Threat Isn’t Skynet — It’s the End of the Middle Class

The AI Threat Isn’t Skynet — It’s the End of the Middle Class | defence technology | Scoop.it
The world's top AI researchers met to consider the threats posed by their research. The global economy could be the first casualty.

 

In the US, the number of manufacturing jobs peaked in 1979 and has steadily decreased ever since. At the same time, manufacturing has steadily increased, with the US now producing more goods than any other country but China. Machines aren’t just taking the place of humans on the assembly line. They’re doing a better job. And all this before the coming wave of AI upends so many other sectors of the economy. “I am less concerned with Terminator scenarios,” MIT economist Andrew McAfee said on the first day at Asilomar. “If current trends continue, people are going to rise up well before the machines do.”

 

McAfee pointed to newly collected data that shows a sharp decline in middle class job creation since the 1980s. Now, most new jobs are either at the very low end of the pay scale or the very high end. He also argued that these trends are reversible, that improved education and a greater emphasis on entrepreneurship and research can help feed new engines of growth, that economies have overcome the rise of new technologies before. But after his talk, in the hallways at Asilomar, so many of the researchers warned him that the coming revolution in AI would eliminate far more jobs far more quickly than he expected.

 

Indeed, the rise of driverless cars and trucks is just a start. New AI techniques are poised to reinvent everything from manufacturing to healthcare to Wall Street. In other words, it’s not just blue-collar jobs that AI endangers. “Several of the rock stars in this field came up to me and said: ‘I think you’re low-balling this one. I think you are underestimating the rate of change,'” McAfee says.

 

That threat has many thinkers entertaining the idea of a universal basic income, a guaranteed living wage paid by the government to anyone left out of the workforce. But McAfee believes this would only make the problem worse, because it would eliminate the incentive for entrepreneurship and other activity that could create new jobs as the old ones fade away. Others question the psychological effects of the idea. “A universal basic income doesn’t give people dignity or protect them from boredom and vice,” Etzioni says.

 

At a time when the Trump administration is promising to make America great again by restoring old-school manufacturing jobs, AI researchers aren’t taking him too seriously. They know that these jobs are never coming back, thanks in no small part to their own research, which will eliminate so many other kinds of jobs in the years to come, as well. At Asilomar, they looked at the real US economy, the real reasons for the “hollowing out” of the middle class. The problem isn’t immigration—far from it. The problem isn’t offshoring or taxes or regulation. It’s technology itself.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from defence technology
Scoop.it!

WhatsApp beats Telegram to be crowned the most secure messaging app

WhatsApp beats Telegram to be crowned the most secure messaging app | defence technology | Scoop.it
Facebook’s messaging apps have been ranked the best in the world for secure communication by Amnesty International - but there's a catch. Although Facebook came out on top, the charity counts WhatsApp and Messenger, with their 2 billion combined users, together in its calculations - and there are some stark differences.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, Lee Kok Thong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Stephen Wolfram: AI & The Future Of Human Civilization

Stephen Wolfram: AI & The Future Of Human Civilization | defence technology | Scoop.it

What makes us different from all these things? What makes us different is the particulars of our history, which gives us our notions of purpose and goals. That's a long way of saying when we have the box on the desk that thinks as well as any brain does, the thing it doesn't have, intrinsically, is the goals and purposes that we have. Those are defined by our particulars—our particular biology, our particular psychology, our particular cultural history.

 

The thing we have to think about as we think about the future of these things is the goals. That's what humans contribute, that's what our civilization contributes—execution of those goals; that's what we can increasingly automate. We've been automating it for thousands of years. We will succeed in having very good automation of those goals. I've spent some significant part of my life building technology to essentially go from a human concept of a goal to something that gets done in the world.

 

There are many questions that come from this. For example, we've got these great AIs and they're able to execute goals, how do we tell them what to do?...

 

STEPHEN WOLFRAM, distinguished scientist, inventor, author, and business leader, is Founder & CEO, Wolfram Research; Creator, Mathematica, Wolfram|Alpha & the Wolfram Language; Author, A New Kind of Science. Stephen Wolfram's Edge Bio Page


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

The limits to human lifespan must be respected

The limits to human lifespan must be respected | defence technology | Scoop.it
Lengthening our lives will come at a cost.

 

A study published online in Nature uses demographic data to reveal a lifespan that human beings cannot exceed, simply by virtue of being human. It’s like running, as an accompanying News and Views article points out. Elite athletes might shave a few milliseconds off the world record for the 100-meter sprint, but they’ll never run the same distance in, say, five seconds, or two. Human beings are simply not made that way. The same is true for longevity. The consequences of myriad factors related to our genetics, metabolism, reproduction and development, all shaped over millions of years of evolution, means that few humans will make it past their 120th birthdays. The name of Jeanne Calment, who died in 1997 at the age of 122, is likely to remain as long in the memory in the Methuselah stakes as that of Usain Bolt on the Olympic track.

 

Maximum lifespan is a bald measure of years accumulated. It is not the same as life expectancy, which is an actuarial measure of how long one is expected to live from birth, or indeed from any given age. Life expectancy at birth has increased in most countries over the past century, not because people have longer lifespans, but mainly because infectious disease does not kill as many infants as it once did. Factors such as poverty and warfare conspire to decrease life expectancy. Although life expectancy at birth has risen steadily for both men and women in France since 1900, for example, there are dramatic and poignant drops that coincide with the two world wars.

 

In Britain in the early twentieth century, many children still died from infectious diseases, and men would die shortly after retiring from physically demanding jobs. The National Health Service was the political response. It has become, in some ways, the victim of its own success. People live longer than they did even a few decades ago, and die (eventually) of different (and more expensive) complaints. As any beginning medical student is soon taught, gerontology is far from a dying discipline. So if we owe our increases in life expectancy to better public health, nutrition, sanitation and vaccination, is it not fair to ask whether more-effective treatments for diseases such as cancer, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s might also yield dividends in maximum lifespan? Will 120th birthday parties become routine, outmatched by a small yet increasing number of sesquicentenarians? The demographic data say no. People are living longer, and the population as a whole is greying, but the rate of increase in the number of centenarians is slowing, and might even have peaked.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from MarketingHits
Scoop.it!

WhatsApp beats Telegram to be crowned the most secure messaging app

WhatsApp beats Telegram to be crowned the most secure messaging app | defence technology | Scoop.it
Facebook’s messaging apps have been ranked the best in the world for secure communication by Amnesty International - but there's a catch. Although Facebook came out on top, the charity counts WhatsApp and Messenger, with their 2 billion combined users, together in its calculations - and there are some stark differences.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Entrepreneurship, Social Media and Digital Marketing
Scoop.it!

Big Data and Analytics for Dummies

Big Data and Analytics for Dummies | defence technology | Scoop.it
"International Data Corporation (IDC) forecasted the big data technology and services market growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 23.1% over the 2014-2019 forecast period with annual spending reaching $48.6 billion in 2019. By 2020, organizations able to analyze all relevant data and deliver actionable information will achieve an extra $430 billion in productivity benefits over their less analytically oriented peers."

Via Jay
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from Entrepreneurship, Social Media and Digital Marketing
Scoop.it!

Want to do your own analytics? Google's free Data Studio takes on Microsoft's Power BI | ZDNet

Want to do your own analytics? Google's free Data Studio takes on Microsoft's Power BI | ZDNet | defence technology | Scoop.it
Google has rolled out a free version of its Data Studio 360, the data visualization toolset for building reports and charts from multiple data sources.

Via Jay
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from i-HLS Israel Homeland Security
Scoop.it!

Israeli Startup Offers Smarter Use Of Security Cameras

Israeli Startup Offers Smarter Use Of Security Cameras | defence technology | Scoop.it

There are around 200 million security cameras all around the world broadcasting pieces of information in any given moment. A young new startup was presented during the Video Analytics conference which took place on October 28th 2015 at the Israel air force center in Herzlyia, offering to use... http://bit.ly/1RDwgC3


Via i-hls Israel Homeland Security
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lee Kok Thong from i-HLS Israel Homeland Security
Scoop.it!

A Quadcopter System To Catch Drones Mid-Air

A Quadcopter System To Catch Drones Mid-Air | defence technology | Scoop.it

Landing fixed-wing UAVs is a problem, a big problem. The added weight from proper landing gear greatly reduces a drone’s range and operational capability, thus limiting both the type and range of missions the machinery could be used for. Now, Insitu, a Boeing subsidiary, has come up with a s... http://bit.ly/1M3lmUJ


Via i-hls Israel Homeland Security
more...
No comment yet.