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Summer Institute on Cultural Neuroscience 2013 | Neuroanthropology

Summer Institute on Cultural Neuroscience 2013 | Neuroanthropology | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
I recently returned from the Summer Institute on Cultural Neuroscience (SICN) hosted by the Center for Culture, Mind and the Brain at the University of Michigan from July 15-26th. For those of you unfamiliar with SICN, this ...
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How consciousness works – Michael Graziano – Aeon

How consciousness works – Michael Graziano – Aeon | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
Consciousness is the ‘hard problem’, the mystery that confounds science and philosophy. Has a new theory cracked it?   

Let’s turn now to a final — alleged — myth. One of the long-standing questions about consciousness is whether it really does anything. Is it merely an epiphenomenon, floating uselessly in our heads like the heat that rises up from the circuitry of a computer? Most of us intuitively understand it to be an active thing: it helps us to decide what to do and when. And yet, at least some of the scientific work on consciousness has proposed the opposite, counter-intuitive view: that it doesn’t really do anything at all; that it is the brain’s after-the-fact story to explain itself. We act reflexively and then make up a rationalisation.

There is some evidence for this post-hoc notion. In countless psychology experiments, people are secretly manipulated into making certain choices — picking green over red, pointing left instead of right. When asked why they made the choice, they confabulate. They make up reasons that have nothing to do with the truth, known only to the experimenter, and they express great confidence in their bogus explanations. It seems, therefore, that at least some of our conscious choices are rationalisations after the fact. But if consciousness is a story we tell ourselves, why do we need it? Why are we aware of anything at all? Why not just be skilful automata, without the overlay of subjectivity? Some philosophers think we are automata and just don’t know it.


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FastTFriend's curator insight, August 25, 2013 12:49 PM

Attention requires control. In the modern study of robotics there is something called control theory, and it teaches us that, if a machine such as a brain is to control something, it helps to have an internal model of that thing. Think of a military general with his model armies arrayed on a map: they provide a simple but useful representation — not always perfectly accurate, but close enough to help formulate strategy. Likewise, to control its own state of attention, the brain needs a constantly updated simulation or model of that state. 

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Clear message from behavioural economics - FT Adviser

Clear message from behavioural economics - FT Adviser | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
Clear message from behavioural economics FT Adviser One such example is the use of behavioural economics which the FCA is using to help it understand how consumers make certain financial decisions, what drives companies' behaviour, and how this...
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Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy

Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
Without empathy, human beings are lonely, disconnected creatures. (Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy: Without empathy, human beings are lone...
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Behavioural economics versus data analytics - D...

Behavioural economics versus data analytics - D... | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
“I don't trust surveys. We shouldn't be asking people for their opinion. We should be trying to understand how they actually behave when faced with a real decision” In recent conversations, the above refrain has become increasingly common.
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Have We Been Brainwashed By Neuroscience? - Forbes

Have We Been Brainwashed By Neuroscience? - Forbes | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
Have We Been Brainwashed By Neuroscience?
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Neuroscience: Language can reveal the invisible

Neuroscience: Language can reveal the invisible | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
neurosciencestuff:
“ It is natural to imagine that the sense of sight takes in the world as it is — simply passing on what the eyes collect from light reflected by the objects around us.
But the eyes...
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Creating meaningful customer experiences and campaigns in social media: Case study of O2 (Telefónica UK)

Creating meaningful customer experiences and campaigns in social media: Case study of O2 (Telefónica UK) | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it

This paper provides an overview of social media at O2, the commercial brand of Telefónica UK Limited and a leading communications company with over 23 million customers. It explains the approach adopted in management, governance and customer service. Four principles of behavioural economics are presented to inform how marketers can create meaningful social media experiences. The paper concludes with a case demonstrating how a social media campaign had a direct impact on sales of a new BlackBerry device at O2.

 

To read the rest, you need to access a library's database or go to http://goo.gl/BFSyp

 

 

 

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FCA: 'Buyer beware' is hard to defend

FCA: 'Buyer beware' is hard to defend | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) has published two occasional papers on behavioural economics to explore how people make financial decisions. Martin Wheatley, FCA chief executive, said: "‘Buyer beware’ becomes hard to defend when unsophisticated customers are buying seriously complicated financial products... The best financial service companies, the most consumer-focused, go to considerable pains to make sure their customers are steered towards the best products and the most suitable. We should applaud these firms and learn from them".

 

The two papers - one on the general application on the techniques at the FCA and the other on encouraging consumers to claim redress - can be found here:

 

http://www.fca.org.uk/your-fca/documents/occasional-papers/occasional-paper-1

 

http://www.fca.org.uk/your-fca/documents/occasional-papers/occasional-paper-2


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The Rise And Rise Of Behavioural Economics

Behavioural economics have become an ever more trendy way of explaining the crisis. In this debate speakers demystify the subject and do battle on the merits of its approach and usefulness. The speakers are: Leigh Caldwell chief executive, Inon; Professor Emre Ozdenoren associate professor of economics, London Business School; Dr Stuart Derbyshire senior lecturer, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham and Dr Michael Savage investment banker and writer, financial economics and development.

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Top 10 Reasons Why Emotions Are Being Ignored In Business | Beyond Philosophy

Top 10 Reasons Why Emotions Are Being Ignored In Business | Beyond Philosophy | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it

In this article, Colin Shaw explores and explains why businesses no longer seem to be taking on board the emotional aspects of business and why it is important to do so to improve the customer experience.

 

We go into work and as leaders we seem to detach our hearts; we spend our business life working on the marketing assumption that all Customers are rational and logical beings and only buy based on Porters 4 P’s – product, price, place & promotion. How utterly ridiculous! Why does this happen? Why is it that something as obvious as making a Customer feel ‘happy’ with you, showing you ‘care’ and ‘value’ your Customers is so alien to many businesses? After working in this area for 15 years and writing four books on Customer Experience here are my top ten reasons why emotions are effectively ignored by many businesses:

 

 

 


Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
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Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 22, 2013 9:14 AM

A very insightful set of reasons. The issue of course is how to overcome these barriers and and use #emotion for greater marketing effectiveness. Some steps are being made in this direction.

Sarah Johnston's curator insight, August 22, 2013 9:47 PM

Very good points! Of course emotional responces are hugely important when it comes to business success. To quote the article itself "we spend our business life working on the marketing assumption that all Customers are rational and logical beings and only buy based on Porters 4 P’s – product, price, place & promotion. How utterly ridiculous!" This is SO true, we need to view consumers as emotional beings and act accordingly. Emotional responses are exactly will drive the consumer to make their final decision. 
Treating customers as though they are all the same and not particularly considering different responses is much too broad a way to look at marketing a product or service.
Porters 4 P's are definitely valid, but they're not all a business needs to consider when developing a marketing strategy.
Understanding consumers needs/wants, treating them well and being helpful and understanding wherever possible is obviously going to have a positive emotional effect. 
Positive emotional effects will in turn inspire sales, as well as encourage a customer to return to that service, seeking to get that same positive service again.
Where as, obviously, negative emotional responses will warrant a negative outlook toward that product/service - leading to a negative outlook toward the entire business, causing sales to decline.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s comment, August 23, 2013 1:58 PM
Actually the 4-P's of marketing were originally developed by Eugene McCarthy at MSU back in the 1960s, not by Michael Porter. In addition, the role of "emotion" or "affect" in market has been recognized by marketing theorists like Lutz, Bagozzi,and many others, since the early 1980s. So this is really not a recent phenomena. What I found interesting about the article was the articulation of the "barriers" to the use of emotion among practitioners.
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Behavioural Economics Versus Data Analytics - Mondaq News Alerts (registration)

Behavioural Economics Versus Data Analytics - Mondaq News Alerts (registration) | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
Behavioural Economics Versus Data Analytics
Mondaq News Alerts (registration)
It is fair to say that behavioural economics is not a traditional or typical tool that a firm might employ to understand more about its customers.
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Summer Institute on Cultural Neuroscience 2013 | Neuroanthropology

Summer Institute on Cultural Neuroscience 2013 | Neuroanthropology | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
I recently returned from the Summer Institute on Cultural Neuroscience (SICN) hosted by the Center for Culture, Mind and the Brain at the University of Michigan from July 15-26th. For those of you unfamiliar with SICN, this ...
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Neuroscience: Idle minds - Why is the brain so active when it seems to be doing nothing at all?

Neuroscience: Idle minds - Why is the brain so active when it seems to be doing nothing at all? | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it

For volunteers, a brain-scanning experiment can be pretty demanding. Researchers generally ask participants to do something — solve mathematics problems, search a scene for faces or think about their favoured political leaders — while their brains are being imaged. But over the past few years, some researchers have been adding a bit of down time to their study protocols. While subjects are still lying in the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanners, the researchers ask them to try to empty their minds. The aim is to find out what happens when the brain simply idles. And the answer is: quite a lot.

 

But what is all this activity for? Ask neuroscientists — even those who study the resting state — and many will sigh or shrug. “We're really at the very beginning. It's mostly hypotheses,” says Amir Shmuel, a brain-imaging specialist at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Resting activity might be keeping the brain's connections running when they are not in use. Or it could be helping to prime the brain to respond to future stimuli, or to maintain relationships between areas that often work together to perform tasks. It may even consolidate memories or information absorbed during normal activity.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Psychology for Marketers: 9 Revealing Principles of Human Behavior

Psychology for Marketers: 9 Revealing Principles of Human Behavior | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
Brush up on these 9 psychology principles to help improve the effectiveness of your marketing.


Digest...

 

1)      Reciprocity: Give away something -- for free -- to help build community or customer loyalty.

2)      Commitments: Though you should never stop trying to delight your customers (per principle #1), it’s important to keep in mind that the longer the commitment they make to you, the harder it could be for them to churn.

3)      Authority: Amp up your authority in your content by prominently featuring authors’ information alongside their blog posts, ebooks, whitepapers, or videos.

4)      Social Proof: One easy way to make the most of social proof is on your blog -- if you're not already, use social sharing and follow buttons that display the number of followers your accounts have or the number of shares a piece of content has.

5)      Liking: You just want people to feel positively affiliated with your brand. So however you make that happen, it's worth a try.

6)      Scarcity 

7)      Recency Illusion: This is important to keep in mind when you’re designing marketing campaigns -- you should be aiming to develop robust, integrated campaigns, not just a one-and-done piece of content.

8)      Verbatim Effect: you should try to pack as much relevant and descriptive information into your headline as you can.

9)      Clustering: Do the legwork for your audience: group similar topics in your writing together -- either under numbered bullet points or with different header sizes.


Via iNeoMarketing
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iNeoMarketing's curator insight, July 12, 2013 3:40 PM

When reading this, you can see how many of these principles are basics to any direct marketing effort.


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Paraic Walsh's curator insight, August 8, 2013 3:15 PM

Good Principles

Milly Moreno's curator insight, August 10, 2014 9:10 PM

Psychology is also used in marketing??

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Behavioural Economics: Interview with Nudge Theorist Thaler

Behavioural Economics: Interview with Nudge Theorist Thaler | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
Stop smoking, eat less, exercise more, pay your taxes on time. So many things governments want us to do; so hard to get us to do them. HARDtalk's Shaun Ley from the BBC programme Hard Talk speaks to behavioural ...
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February | 2013 | Behavioural Insights Team (Nudge Unit)

The Behavioural Insights Team, or 'Nudge Unit', draws on insights from the growing body of academic research in the fields of behavioural economics and psychology and applies these insights to public policy making in the UK.

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Why Behavioural Economics Matters

Why Behavioural Economics Matters | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
"You're being irrational!". I am sure that over the course of your life, perhaps even the course of the last week, you have either said or been the subject of this statement. Did it make you feel w...

Via Peter Boettke
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Peter Boettke's curator insight, August 6, 2013 10:52 AM

Substitute the term behavioral economics (which means a lot different things to a lot of different people and which in large part is based on a mischaracterization of the rational actor model) for the phrase "market process economics", or "entrepreneurial perspective on the market", or "Austrian economics", etc.  Look at Hayek's work both in terms of cognitive science as well as the epistemic turn in economics or his emphasis on institutional context in human decision making.  Hayek had a lot more to say than the cartoon version of The Road to Serfdom, and there is a lot more IN the actual book The Road to Serfdom that relates to all of these issues.  

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An Infographic Guide To Color Psychology

An Infographic Guide To Color Psychology | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it

Have you ever had difficulty choosing colours for a new scheme or wondered why we associate some colours with good luck and others with danger? Welcome to The Complete Infographic Guide to Colour Psychology.

Discover all you ever needed to know about the psychology behind colours and why their meaning differs depending on which country you’re from…


Via Lauren Moss
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Authentis Formations's curator insight, August 27, 2013 9:52 AM

Influence des couleurs sur la psyché....

taniaATenthuse.me's comment, August 29, 2013 11:34 AM
Great infographic, thank you for sharing Lauren. It reminds us of the significant influence that society and cultural values have on so many different aspects of our lives.
taniaATenthuse.me's curator insight, August 29, 2013 11:59 AM

This Colour Psychology infographic reminds us of the significant influence that societal and cultural values have on so many different aspects of our lives. The implications are so many. This guide can be really useful for entrepreneurs and freelancers when they decide on logo and branding. 

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Death of homo economicus, rise of behavioral economics

Death of homo economicus, rise of behavioral economics | Awfully Curious | Scoop.it
Death of homo economicus, rise of behavioral economics (RT @Colinstrong: Interesting article on the rise of Behavioural Economics.....http://t.co/MgvRylF4...)...

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