Deep Ocean Biome
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The Biological Productivity of the Ocean | Learn Science at Scitable

The Biological Productivity of the Ocean | Learn Science at Scitable | Deep Ocean Biome | Scoop.it
Productivity fuels life in the ocean, drives its chemical cycles, and lowers atmospheric carbon dioxide. Nutrient uptake and export interact with circulation to yield distinct ocean regimes.
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The Deep Sea ~ Ocean biology, Marine life, Sea creatures, Marine conservation...

The Deep Sea ~ Ocean biology, Marine life, Sea creatures, Marine conservation... | Deep Ocean Biome | Scoop.it
Found out all about The Deep Sea at MarineBio.org
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Protecting Earth's Final Frontier -- The Deep Sea

Protecting Earth's Final Frontier -- The Deep Sea | Deep Ocean Biome | Scoop.it
“ To unleash the same destructive, uncontrolled corporate determinism into the deep sea that has destroyed much of the land surface of our planet would be an historic mistake.”
Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
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Ocean trenches: Take a dive 11,000m down - BBC interactive

Ocean trenches: Take a dive 11,000m down - BBC interactive | Deep Ocean Biome | Scoop.it
“ Icy cold, pitch black and with crushing pressures - the deepest part of the ocean is one of the most hostile places on the planet.”
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Robert Ballard: The astonishing hidden world of the deep ocean | Video on TED.com

“ Ocean explorer Robert Ballard takes us on a mindbending trip to hidden worlds underwater, where he and other researchers are finding unexpected life, resources, even new mountains. He makes a case for serious exploration and mapping.”
Via Jon Samuelson
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Deep sea

Deep sea | Deep Ocean Biome | Scoop.it
Conservation of ocean environments, seas, coasts, the coral reefs and their magnicient diversity of marine animals and plants.
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Deep-Sea Creature Photos -- National Geographic

Deep-Sea Creature Photos -- National Geographic | Deep Ocean Biome | Scoop.it
Adaptation is the name of the game when you live thousands of feet below the water's surface. See how these deep-sea denizens make the most of their deep, dark home.
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Deep-sea fishing regulations and a crucial European vote

Deep-sea fishing regulations and a crucial European vote | Deep Ocean Biome | Scoop.it
“ Richard Branson: The future of the deep ocean and its ecosystem depends on the EU leading the way on sustainable fishing and ocean conservation”
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The Mariana trench, deepest point in the ocean is teeming with life

The Mariana trench, deepest point in the ocean is teeming with life | Deep Ocean Biome | Scoop.it
Hollywood director James Cameron found little evidence of life when hedescended nearly 11,000 metres to the deepest point in the world's oceans last year. If only he had taken a microscope and looked just a few centimetres deeper. Ronnie Glud at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense, and his colleagues, have discovered unusually high levels of microbial activity in the sediments at the site of Cameron's dive – Challenger Deep at the bottom of the western Pacific's Mariana Trench. Glud's team dispatched autonomous sensors and sample collectors into the trench to measure microbial activity in the top 20 centimetres of sediment on the sea bed. The pressure there is almost 1100 times greater than at the surface. Finding food, however, is an even greater challenge than surviving high pressures for anything calling the trench home. Any nourishment must come in the form of detritus falling from the surface ocean, most of which is consumed by other organisms on the way down. Only 1 per cent of the organic matter generated at the surface reaches the sea floor's abyssal plains, 3000 to 6000 metres below sea level. So what are the chances of organic matter making it even deeper, into the trenches that form when one tectonic plate ploughs beneath another? Surprisingly, the odds seem high. Glud's team compared sediment samples taken from Challenger Deep and a reference site on the nearby abyssal plain. The bacteria at Challenger Deep were around 10 times as abundant as those on the abyssal plain, with every cubic centimetre of sediment containing 10 million microbes. The deep microbes were also twice as active as their shallower kin. These figures make sense, says Glud, because ocean trenches are particularly good at capturing sediment. They are broad as well as deep, with a steep slope down to the deepest point, so any sediment falling on their flanks quickly cascades down to the bottom in muddy avalanches. Although the sediment may contain no more than 1 per cent organic matter, so much of it ends up at Challenger Deep that the level of microbial activity shoots up. "There is much more than meets the eye at the bottom of the sea," says Hans Røy, at Aarhus University in Denmark. Last year, he studied seafloor sediments below the north Pacific gyre – an area that, unlike Challenger Deep, is almost devoid of nutrients. Remarkably, though, even here Røy found living microbes.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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