Deep Earth Tectonic Plates
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Supercontinent Pangaea Pushed, Not Sucked, Into Place

Supercontinent Pangaea Pushed, Not Sucked, Into Place | Deep Earth Tectonic Plates | Scoop.it
A plume of superheated rock from deep in Earth's crust welled up between the ancient continents, pushing them apart until they collided to form Pangaea, a new study proposes.
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Indo-Australian tectonic plate is breaking in pieces

Indo-Australian tectonic plate is breaking in pieces | Deep Earth Tectonic Plates | Scoop.it
AN 8.7 earthquake that struck west of Indonesia on April 11 was the biggest of its kind ever recorded and confirms suspicions that a giant tectonic plate is breaking up, scientists said yesterday.
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2012 Gippsland earthquake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A magnitude 5.4 earthquake struck Gippsland near Moe at 8.55 pm on 19 June 2012, at a shallow depth of 9.9 km.[1] It was the strongest recorded in Victoria in at least three decades,[2][3] with some sources suggesting it was the strongest in over a century.[4][5] It was felt across much of Victoria and parts of New South Wales, with strong shaking reported across the state capital, Melbourne. Some minor building damage was reported in the Latrobe Valley close to the epicentre, and in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. Around 30 requests for help were made to the SES, mainly due to cracked walls and ceilings,[6] and a number of local businesses lost some stock.[7] Approximately 60 aftershocks were recorded the following day, but most of these were not felt.[8]

A magnitude 4.5 aftershock occurred in the same area at 7.11 pm on 20 July 2012 at a similar depth. This tremor was felt across south Gippsland, as well as Melbourne and the Mornington Peninsula.[9] This aftershock is the strongest so far of over 200 that have occurred since the initial quake.[10]

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Pangea (supercontinent)

Pangea (supercontinent) | Deep Earth Tectonic Plates | Scoop.it
In early geologic time, a “supercontinent” that incorporated almost all of Earth’s landmasses and covered nearly one-third of Earth’s surface. It was surrounded by a global ocean called Panthalassa. Pangea...
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A history of supercontinents on planet Earth

A history of supercontinents on planet Earth | Deep Earth Tectonic Plates | Scoop.it
Earth's continents are constantly changing, moving and rearranging themselves over millions of years - affecting Earth's climate and biology. Every few hundred million years, the continents combine to create massive, world-spanning supercontinents.
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Pangea

Pangea | Deep Earth Tectonic Plates | Scoop.it
An overview of the supercontinent of Pangea, which covered one-third of the planet and began to break up about 200 million years ago to form the modern continents of today.
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Between a rock and a hard plate - The Age Education Resource Centre

Between a rock and a hard plate - The Age Education Resource Centre | Deep Earth Tectonic Plates | Scoop.it
THE earth may not have shaken for you yet, but the signs are all there. One of the planet’s biggest tectonic plates, the Indo-Australian plate on which the continents of India and Australia lie, is cracking up.
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Magnitude-5.4 quake shakes southern Victoria - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Magnitude-5.4 quake shakes southern Victoria - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Deep Earth Tectonic Plates | Scoop.it
South-east Victoria has been rocked by more than 40 aftershocks after a magnitude-5.4 earthquake hit near Moe in Gippsland.
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Volcanoes: our unpredictable, often dangerous, reminder of a planet still in ... - South China Morning Post

Volcanoes: our unpredictable, often dangerous, reminder of a planet still in ... - South China Morning Post | Deep Earth Tectonic Plates | Scoop.it
Volcanoes: our unpredictable, often dangerous, reminder of a planet still in ...
South China Morning Post
This results from it spanning junctions between four tectonic plates - immense sheets in the earth's crust.
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