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'Sonic the Hedgehog' vid games coming to Nintendo | krqe.com

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sonic the Hedgehog is rolling with Nintendo.
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New fluorescent protein from eel revolutionizes key clinical assay

New fluorescent protein from eel revolutionizes key clinical assay | DECRYPT | Scoop.it
Many scientists dream of making a single discovery that provides fundamental insight into nature, may be used to help save human lives, and can assist in the preservation of an endangered species.
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Injectable nano-network controls blood sugar in diabetics for days at a time

Injectable nano-network controls blood sugar in diabetics for days at a time | DECRYPT | Scoop.it

In a promising development for diabetes treatment, researchers have developed a network of nanoscale particles that can be injected into the body and release insulin when blood-sugar levels rise, maintaining normal blood sugar levels for more than a week in animal-based laboratory tests. The work was done by researchers at North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Children's Hospital Boston.

 

The new, injectable nano-network is composed of a mixture containing nanoparticles with a solid core of insulin, modified dextran and glucose oxidase enzymes. When the enzymes are exposed to high glucose levels they effectively convert glucose into gluconic acid, which breaks down the modified dextran and releases the insulin. The insulin then brings the glucose levels under control. The gluconic acid and dextran are fully biocompatible and dissolve in the body.

 

Each of these nanoparticle cores is given either a positively charged or negatively charged biocompatible coating. The positively charged coatings are made of chitosan (a material normally found in shrimp shells), while the negatively charged coatings are made of alginate (a material normally found in seaweed).

 

When the solution of coated nanoparticles is mixed together, the positively and negatively charged coatings are attracted to each other to form a "nano-network." Once injected into the subcutaneous layer of the skin, the nano-network holds the nanoparticles together and prevents them from dispersing throughout the body. Both the nano-network and the coatings are porous, allowing blood -- and blood sugar -- to reach the nanoparticle cores.

 

"This technology effectively creates a 'closed-loop' system that mimics the activity of the pancreas in a healthy person, releasing insulin in response to glucose level changes," Gu says. "This has the potential to improve the health and quality of life of diabetes patients."

Gu's research team is currently in discussions to move the technology into clinical trials for use in humans.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Justin Rawle
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Animal self-medication: Parasite-infected butterflies lay eggs on medicinal plant for better survival of offspring

Animal self-medication: Parasite-infected butterflies lay eggs on medicinal plant for better survival of offspring | DECRYPT | Scoop.it

It's been known for decades that animals such as chimpanzees seek out medicinal herbs to treat their diseases. But in recent years, the list of animal pharmacists has grown much longer, and it now appears that the practice of animal self-medication is a lot more widespread than previously thought, according to a University of Michigan ecologist and his colleagues.

 

Animals use medications to treat various ailments through both learned and innate behaviors. The fact that moths, ants and fruit flies are now known to self-medicate has profound implications for the ecology and evolution of animal hosts and their parasites, according to Mark Hunter, a professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

In addition, because plants remain the most promising source of future pharmaceuticals, studies of animal medication may lead the way in discovering new drugs to relieve human suffering, Hunter and two colleagues wrote in a review article titled "Self-Medication in Animals," published online April 11 in the journal Science.

 

"When we watch animals foraging for food in nature, we now have to ask, are they visiting the grocery store or are they visiting the pharmacy?" Hunter said. "We can learn a lot about how to treat parasites and disease by watching other animals."

 

Much of the work in this field has focused on cases in which animals, such as baboons and woolly bear caterpillars, medicate themselves. One recent study has suggested that house sparrows and finches add high-nicotine cigarette butts to their nests to reduce mite infestations.

 

But less attention has been given to the many cases in which animals medicate their offspring or other kin, according to Hunter and his colleagues. Wood ants incorporate an antimicrobial resin from conifer trees into their nests, preventing microbial growth in the colony. Parasite-infected monarch butterflies protect their offspring against high levels of parasite growth by laying their eggs on anti-parasitic milkweed.

Hunter and his colleagues suggest that researchers in the field should "de-emphasize the 'self' in self-medication" and base their studies on a more inclusive framework.

 

"Perhaps the biggest surprise for us was that animals like fruit flies and butterflies can choose food for their offspring that minimizes the impacts of disease in the next generation," Hunter said. "There are strong parallels with the emerging field of epigenetics in humans, where we now understand that dietary choices made by parents influence the long-term health of their children."

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Justin Rawle
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Tiny new LEDs can be injected into the brain

Tiny new LEDs can be injected into the brain | DECRYPT | Scoop.it

Optogenetics is the process by which genetically-programmed neurons or other cells can be activated by subjecting them to light. Among other things, the technology helps scientists understand how the brain works, which could in turn lead to new treatments for brain disorders. Presently, fiber optic cables must be wired into the brains of test animals in order to deliver light to the desired regions. That may be about to change, however, as scientists have created tiny LEDs that can be injected into the brain.

 

 


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An Undying Ability To Question, Thinking The Unthinkable, Evaluating, And Rating The Self Are Practices Encouraged Through The Conduction Of Seminars And Tutorials! | Uzavegufa onybu

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Coriell Institute for Medical Research Spin-Out Wants to be the Bank Where Doctors Can Stash Your Genome | MIT Technology Review

Coriell Institute for Medical Research Spin-Out Wants to be the Bank Where Doctors Can Stash Your Genome | MIT Technology Review | DECRYPT | Scoop.it
A new company offers a “gene vault” for doctors who want to add genomics to patient care.
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Rosetta@home - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rosetta@home is a distributed computing project for protein structure prediction on the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) platform, run by the Baker laboratory at the University of Washington. Rosetta@home aims to predict protein–protein docking and design new proteins with the help of about sixty thousand active volunteered computers processing at 62 teraFLOPS on average as of October 18, 2011.[3]Foldit, a Rosetta@Home videogame, aims to reach these goals with a crowdsourcing approach. Though much of the project is oriented towards basic research on improving the accuracy and robustness of the proteomics methods, Rosetta@home also does applied research on malaria, Alzheimer's disease and other pathologies.[4]

Like all BOINC projects, Rosetta@home uses idle computer processing resources from volunteers' computers to perform calculations on individual workunits. Completed results are sent to a central project server where they are validated and assimilated into project databases. The project is cross-platform, and runs on a wide variety of hardware configurations. Users can view the progress of their individual protein structure prediction on the Rosetta@home screensaver.

In addition to disease-related research, the Rosetta@home network serves as a testing framework for new methods in structural bioinformatics. These new methods are then used in other Rosetta-based applications, like RosettaDock and the Human Proteome Folding Project, after being sufficiently developed and proven stable on Rosetta@home's large and diverse collection of volunteer computers. Two particularly important tests for the new methods developed in Rosetta@home are the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and Critical Assessment of Prediction of Interactions (CAPRI) experiments, biannual experiments which evaluate the state of the art in protein structure prediction and protein–protein docking prediction, respectively. Rosetta@home consistently ranks among the foremost docking predictors, and is one of the best tertiary structure predictors available.[5]

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Brave New Cells? by Donna Dickenson - Project Syndicate

Brave New Cells? by Donna Dickenson - Project Syndicate | DECRYPT | Scoop.it
A public consultation has been launched in the UK to gauge attitudes toward controversial new medical procedures aimed at preventing the transmission of certain genetic diseases.

 

The aim is preventing the transmission of incurable diseases that result from mutations of cell structures called mitochondria. Supporters of such research are framing criticism of it as opposition to saving children’s lives and an impediment to scientific development. But this view neglects a crucial factor in the debate: the techniques being developed involve permanent genetic alterations passed on to future generations.

 

Read more at http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/the-risks-of-mitochondrial-research-in-the-uk-by-donna-dickenson#gUA7V5kctfFIVeKv.99


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Nanoscribe: 3D Scaffolds for Biomimetics for Cell Biology

Nanoscribe: 3D Scaffolds for Biomimetics for Cell Biology | DECRYPT | Scoop.it

3D polymer scaffolds for cells: Biocompatible 3D microstructures act as artificial extracellular matrices for cells to mimic a natural but reproducible environment. Other applications are the fabrication of micro-needles, stents and so on for medical purposes.

 

Shown are a series of structures fabricated by means of the direct laser writing technique with Photonic Professional systems. Typical topics of interest which are under investigation are the study of cell migration or stem cell differentiation. The 3D tailored environment acts as an artificial extracellular matrix, i.e., a scaffold for the cells. Pictures: F. Klein, B. Richter J. Fischer, T. Striebel und M. Bastmeyer; Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT). 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Justin Rawle
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