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The Geography of Valentine’s Day: 4 Maps to Explain a World in Love

The Geography of Valentine’s Day: 4 Maps to Explain a World in Love | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it

Jewelry, flowers...where is most of the love shown based on these maps?


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595 - It’s Always Chile in Norway: the Five Types of Territorial Morphology | Strange Maps | Big Think

595 - It’s Always Chile in Norway: the Five Types of Territorial Morphology | Strange Maps | Big Think | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
Do Norwegians feel curiously at home in Chile, and vice versa? Do South Africans have a strange affinity with Italians? And Filipinos with Maldivians?

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MAP: The Best-Selling Car In Every State

MAP: The Best-Selling Car In Every State | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
We pulled the data to find the best-selling car in every state this year.

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How Many Countries Are There?


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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:12 PM

This is one of those frequently asked questions in Geography class that sometimes results in increased confusion. The maker of this video has summed it up nicely.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:44 AM

What makes a country a country is if they play by the rules, of other soverin nations on a global scale and follow the rules. Most countries recieve taxes from their citizens, have a military and a recognized as a soverin. Not every body of land is a country but are also properties controlled by other countries. There are countries in the South Pacific. In North, South America, Europe, and Asia, and bevcause of politcal geopgrahpy nations sizes are changing often and new countries are usually created from theis process

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:44 AM

193....except........

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This Map Shows The Most Famous Book Set In Every State

This Map Shows The Most Famous Book Set In Every State | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
Every state has a book that it is best known for. Here are the most famous books that take place in every state.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 15, 2013 2:00 PM

Click here to read more about each of these titles. 

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Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms

Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Feedlots, a new series of images crafted by British artist Mishka Henner, uses publicly available satellite imagery to show the origins of mass-produced meat products."

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.  


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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:35 AM

British artist Mishka Henner took photographs and enhanced the colors of feedlots to reveal the agribusiness of meat production. Photographs of feedlots are considered illegal and the legal repercussions of Mishka Henner are not clear at the moment, but the photographs are shocking and reveal again how little Americans know about their food production. 

Americans have changed the places and utilized them to build agribusiness empires and have introduced new problems to the landscape of feedlot and farming towns.

 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:46 AM

This article makes me sickened. With previous knowledge of factory farms I know of the horrors that go on but this takes the cake. These pictures shown in the article depict the chemical and waste spill off which I am absolutely sure this is NOT good for the environment.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:56 PM

Beautiful imagery at one scale tells an unsavory story at another.

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Regional slang words

Regional slang words | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:50 PM

Although this was a rescooped article from another geography profile, when you clicked on it the link didn't come up. Here is the main link: http://mentalfloss.com/article/52558/107-regional-slang-words. A ton of people use slang words, but can you think of one hundred and seven different ones that you use? I know before I watched this video I couldn't. Just the first seven listed in this video were all describing a can of Dr. Pepper. One term they used that I had never heard was a Tonic. This was used in Boston so it was surprising to not here of it, especially when being so close to RI. Other slangs words varied from calling a grinder a hoogie, saying something is Baltic, meaning cold, and streams being called branches, usually in Wisconsin. It was interesting to see all the different words used to describe everyday items all around the world. We may talk a lot of slang, but I can guarantee that no one has heard of all these different slang terms. Great video produced by a funny guy, really enjoyable.  

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 11:10 AM

This was a neat video.  Many of the slang words that I knew about were touched upon, but many were very new to me.  I never knew the "bubbler" originated in Wisconsin.  I thought that was purely a R.I. thing.  Watching the video made me think of how different regions were originally settled by different ethnicity groups between the early 1600's and 1800's, which almost surely led to these slangs, in my opinion.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:55 PM

This was a great video describing what people call different items all over the world.  Just in Rhode Island alone, people from different parts of the state refer to items in different ways.  I think it could have been better if he stuck to the United States only.  Its crazy how different people experience things so close in proximity to each other.  It also would have been great to show how different regions in the U.S. say certain words.  He probably could have made a 30 minute video on that alone and it would have been hilarious.

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National Flags Created From the Foods Each Country Is Commonly Associated With

National Flags Created From the Foods Each Country Is Commonly Associated With | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
Feeling hungry? You will be after looking through this creative collection of food photography by Australian advertising agency WHYBIN\TBWA. To promote the
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What Religion Does Your Member Of Congress Identify With?

What Religion Does Your Member Of Congress Identify With? | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
A breakdown of Congress' religious makeup. One nation, under God, with liberty and justice for all.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 24, 2013 8:02 PM

Cultural geography! Very intersting!

Adilson Camacho's comment, August 24, 2013 8:03 PM
http://mappingmormonism.byu.edu/?page_id=12
Hannah Hitchcock's curator insight, December 13, 2013 2:09 PM

This map adds interesting insight to how Religion might affect Congress. America is a very Christian country, supported by the map. The other non-Christian religions are shown to be condensed in to small or isolated areas. This also supports the stereotypical ideas we have of the regions in America. Baptist for exapmle, is highly popular in the south. This is typically the religion we associate with the south. The Mid-West is an area with a high Mormon population, therefore it makes sense that the representatives fom those states consist of Mormon religious people. 

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An Animated Introduction to Social Science

This video defines the broad-spectrum discipline of social science. Social Science is made up of anthropology, geography, sociology, political science and ps...

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 15, 2013 7:58 AM

Cute intro video for Social Sciences and how things relate to Geography

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9 Billion? A Whirlwind Trip Through Population Trends

The world has never seen anything like the population explosion of the past century. The United Nations projects that the global population will top 9 billio...

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 12, 2013 10:12 PM

Population trends

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:27 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of population growth rates because it uses UN information about population and population trends to predict beyond the present and make suggestions on what to do about it.

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Understanding Global Statistics

Understanding Global Statistics | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."


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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:49 PM

Un conjunto de sencillas infografias para visualizar estadisticas de la humanidad en el tiempo presente

trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:46 AM
good one
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:11 PM

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.

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jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 5:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:04 PM

China's one-child policy has had a greater effect than slowing population growth and decreasing the labor force. Another widespread problem for parents obeying this rule is the loss of their only child and the devastation it brings due to the cultural importance of family in China. Ancestors are greatly respected and descendents mark a great life. After parents retire they rely on their children for support and their needs. When they do not have a child anymore, their whole life derails and they spend the rest of their days with a broken family that can never quite heal. In many cases, the parents are then too old to have another child and their life simply falls apart. Protests have been made in the past for similar situations, but the Chinese government has not yet fulfilled its promises to provide greater assistance to these parents or to change their policy.

 

This article relates to population and migration through the population policy of China and its drastic effects on family life and parents. This policy would be classified as anti-natalist because of its promotion of smaller families with less children. It discourages having children.

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Soda vs. Pop vs. Coke: Mapping How Americans Talk

Soda vs. Pop vs. Coke: Mapping How Americans Talk | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
A video about the words we say and how we say them.

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Mapping America's Restless Interstate Migration Without a Map - Wired Science

Mapping America's Restless Interstate Migration Without a Map - Wired Science | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
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This map shows where the world’s 30 million slaves live. There are 60,000 in the U.S.

This map shows where the world’s 30 million slaves live. There are 60,000 in the U.S. | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
Yes, slavery still exists – even here.
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Geography of Soccer in the US

Geography of Soccer in the US | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it

" 549 players from 62 different countries play in MLS in the United States"


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 11:40 PM

Perfect example of cultural diffusion.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:59 AM

I am a huge soccer fan and with that i also have to say i tend to neglect the MLS due to its lack of talent. The problem in the past with the MLS was that it was too home grown and their wasnt many international players to provide a wider demographic in the leauge which also means worse players. But with the MLS signing some big names from around the world such as Henry from France Beckham from Uk and Cahill from the AU the MLS is growing in popularity around the world and is soon to be a globally viewed leauge. This is a map of where the nearly 600 MLS players come from and it goes to show the more nations you can represent the bigger crowd demographic you can draw in.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:25 PM

There are 35 MLS players that came from Africa according to the article. In America soccer or football in Europe is not that popular it is more like our baseball or football then like the soccer over there. (That is their "past time") In America we have a large population that play sports but specifically soccer we do not have that many participants that involve themselves in this , I think part of the reason is that abroad soccer is so important to them and they try to flourish from that sport onto tournments and other MLS players go for the cup. Oppose to America and our excitment about the NFL and MBL.

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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


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Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:21 PM

Even though this article is now three years old, it is refreshing to see that Mexico is really making their mark on the global market. The Global North seems to be coming to a stalemate while "up and coming countries" like Mexico are becoming the perfect place for people to begin their businesses and have a fresh start on life. I can understand though, how it was mentioned on the third page of the article, that some locals may feel that foreigners, European especially, may be receiving some type of special treatment due to past colonialism. However, these entrepreneurs are shaping the economy of Mexico. This is Mexico's chance to advance in the world and increase its GDP. Young, aspiring moguls all seems to feel the same way about their homelands, "Europe, dying; Mexico, coming to life. The United States, closed and materialistic; Mexico, open and creative" and Diego Quemada-Diez, a Spanish director, was quoted in the article, "Europe feels spiritually dead and so does the United States...[y]ou end up wanting something else".  And apparently, Mexico has that "something else".

 

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 10:25 AM

Again, I would be interested in seeing how these statistics would change if they were to factor in illegal immigration from Mexico into the United States, but the data remains promising. Mexico has the potential to be an economic powerhouse, and hopefully will utilize this potential sooner rather than later. Although rampant corruption remains in the nation's politics and reinforcement agencies, a strong Mexican economy will ultimately deescalate the violence by stripping the cartels of their strongest allure- well-paying employment for uneducated young men. A stronger Mexican economy will also undoubtedly help the US in terms of trade, as well as reducing the rate of cartel-related violence in the southern regions of the nation. With so many Americans today rallying around Trump's racially-charged rants on Mexican immigration, it brings a smile to my face that we are currently sending more Americans to take Mexican jobs than they are sending our way. The hypocrisy of these politicians and their policies are laughable. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:20 AM

I’ve posted earlier about the end of cheap China; the rising cost of doing business in China coupled with the higher transportation costs to get goods to North American and European markets have made manufacturing in Mexican much more competitive on the global market.  Many investors are turning to Mexico as an emerging land of opportunity and Mexico is now a destination for migrants.  This is still a new pattern:  only 1 percent of the country is foreign-born compared to the 13 percent that you would see in the United States.  Mexican migration to the United States has stabilized; about as many Mexicans have moved to the U.S. (2005-2010) as those that have moved south of the border.


Tags: Mexico, industry, location, place, migration.

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Every Library and Museum in America, Mapped

Every Library and Museum in America, Mapped | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
America's collection of museums and libraries is actually super impressive when you look at it on a map.
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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:34 AM

This map shows how linguistically diverse the United States is today. This map reminded me of one of the slides that we went over in class about how in the Northwest Region the predominant language was German and now it is mainly English, with some German and Native American languages still spoken in certain parts.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 10:29 PM

This data is very interesting because you can see that most of these statements speak Spanish. I noticed that most people who speak another language at home (in this case Spanish)  besides English are located in the south western of United States. I wonder if this has something to do with people who immigrated to U.S  from south America.

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Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran

Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
The future of Iran will be determined by the first post-Revolution generation. Here's what they're like.

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Siri Anderson's curator insight, August 25, 2013 9:52 AM

Who knew? Would be nice to have students develop some raps that appealed to democratic, peaceful, shared-world sensibilities.

Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:36 AM

POPULATION PYRAMIDS!

Isabelle Zahn's curator insight, January 18, 2014 3:02 PM

In this article you see the concept of gender population and folk culture. This article talks about how Iran has had their baby boom population in there right now between the mid teens and the mid-20s. It also talks about how all of the young people are starting to control everything and things are becoming run by the young people. Most of the government is run by young people there all of the young people are just starting to pop up and down getting married as you get there I having more kids because it's a big huge population of young people. This has an impact on every music sucks local national and international communities because every community at some point will have a baby boom generation for us right now it's kind of an older generation for other countries the younger generations so really every time she goes through these baby-boom stages. Some short-term effects of this could be a lot of new births because all the people are starting to get a little bit older because their mid teens to mid 20s they will be getting married soon and will want have families.  Some long-term effects could be another baby boom generation possibly coming because of this baby boom generation all the side to have kids that he couldn't another baby boom generation were everybody wants to have a kid so their country may decide to good use birth control or something that will reduce the chances of having another baby good population because their country can't support all of those people. 

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Time Lapse: Maiden call of the world's largest ship

Time Lapse: Maiden call of the world's largest ship | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
Remarkable time lapse video shows the first port call of Maersk Line's Triple-E vessel -- the world's largest ship -- in the Port of Busan in South Korea. Credit: 2nd Officer Yaroslav Karetnikov of the MÆRSK MC-KINNEY MØLLER.

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The 20 Most Iconic Food Destinations Across America

The 20 Most Iconic Food Destinations Across America | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it
Every city has that one place that tourists and locals alike go to for local flavor. Which one is the best?

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 11, 2013 11:09 AM

Food. Culture. Regional differences. Many connections to APHG

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 11:45 AM

unit 3

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The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River

The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River | Decatur Human Geography | Scoop.it

" A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution)."

 


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:20 AM

INland water environments

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 4, 2013 9:40 PM

Land use is different around Mississippi River basin.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:28 PM

The Mississippi River flows down the east side of the United States. Since the river is so long it has many streams that expand off it it as well. As you can see in the picture the red parts are the sections where the water has branched off the Mississippi River. It takes up almost all of the middle section of the United States.