Dead Drifting
3 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sean Monahan
Scoop.it!

Fishing tips for catching Brook Trout - Manteca Bulletin

Fishing tips for catching Brook Trout - Manteca Bulletin | Dead Drifting | Scoop.it
Fishing tips for catching Brook Trout Manteca Bulletin Truth be told, I like all the trouts. I like the wild Rainbows native to California's western Sierra.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Monahan
Scoop.it!

Bighorn River brown trout populations rise | Montana Trout Unlimited

Bighorn River brown trout populations rise | Montana Trout Unlimited | Dead Drifting | Scoop.it
Montana Trout Unlimited's mission is to conserve, protect, and restore Montana's world-class coldwater fisheries and their watersheds.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sean Monahan from Global Evolution: Will we be in time?
Scoop.it!

Top Fishing Tip Posts of 2012

Top Fishing Tip Posts of 2012 | Dead Drifting | Scoop.it
OK, today’s the last day on which we look back at our best posts of 2012.  We’ve already covered our best posts about trout fishing, steelhead fishing, bonefishing, and fly fishing gear...

Via Alison D. Gilbert
more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, January 24, 2013 8:10 AM

I miss fly fishing so much.

Scooped by Sean Monahan
Scoop.it!

New record brook trout is also sign of acid rain recovery - The Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Examiner.com New record brook trout is also sign of acid rain recovery The Adirondack Daily Enterprise Rick Beauchamp of Mayfield, Fulton County, is the new holder of the state record for brook trout after catching a 6-pound, 22.5-inch fish on May...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Monahan
Scoop.it!

Ga. officials stock streams with trout for fishing - MyFox Atlanta

Ga. officials stock streams with trout for fishing - MyFox Atlanta | Dead Drifting | Scoop.it
TheNewsTribune.com Ga. officials stock streams with trout for fishing MyFox Atlanta ATLANTA (AP) - The Georgia Department of Natural Resources is stocking north Georgia streams with fish to prepare for opening day of trout season.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sean Monahan from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Salmons seem to use the Earth's magnetic field to navigate across the ocean as they return home

Salmons seem to use the Earth's magnetic field to navigate across the ocean as they return home | Dead Drifting | Scoop.it
Salmon use the Earth's magnetic field to navigate the ocean as they make the long journey home to spawn, research suggests.

 

Each year millions of fish make the journey home in one of the toughest migrations of the animal kingdom. The memory of the magnetic field where they first entered the sea helps them find their way back, say US scientists.

 

The journey of adult sockeye salmon from the northern Pacific Ocean back to the individual freshwater rivers of their birth is one of the toughest migrations of all animals. There are several theories for how salmon locate their nurseries after spending years out at sea. One hypothesis, known as natal homing, is that salmon use both chemical and geomagnetic cues to find their way home.

 

In order to test the theory, researchers studied fisheries data spanning 56 years charting the return of salmon to the Fraser River in British Columbia. The route the fish chose to swim around Vancouver Island matched the intensity of the geomagnetic field near their home rivers.  Nathan Putman, a researcher at Oregon State University, told BBC News: "For salmon to find their way back home, they remember the magnetic field that exists where they first enter the sea as juveniles, and once they reach maturity, they seek that same coastal location, with the same magnetic field. "In other words, salmon remember the magnetic field where they enter the ocean and come back to that same spot once they reach maturity."

 

Exactly how the fish "imprint" the magnetic field near where they were born is unknown, but the scientists believe the change from fresh to saltwater triggers some kind of neurological process. The memory helps the fish find its way back to the mouth of its home river, and from there it uses chemical cues to locate its birth stream.

 

James J Anderson and Chloe Bracis of the University of Washington say the work supports recent modelling studies showing geomagnetic imprinting is feasible to return salmon to their home river. It also complements laboratory findings that trout olfactory systems can detect geomagnetic fields. Commenting on the study, they said: "The authors build on a long series of their work on the navigation of marine animals and provide the first solid evidence that salmon use geomagnetic cues to direct their oceanic migration." The researchers plan to carry out lab research to find out more about how salmon navigate through magnetic fields. This may eventually prove useful for commercial fisheries, they say.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.