De Natura Rerum
Follow
Find
9.6K views | +1 today
 
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Geography Education
onto De Natura Rerum
Scoop.it!

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it

"The breakthrough came in 1996, when a new class of antiretroviral drug called protease inhibitors was launched. These were used in combination with two older drugs that worked in different ways. The combination meant that evolving resistance required the simultaneous appearance of several beneficial (from the virus’s point of view) mutations—which is improbable.  With a viable treatment available, political action became more realistic. AIDS had been a “political” disease from the beginning, because a lot of the early victims were middle-class gay Americans, a group already politically active. Activists were split between those who favoured treating people already infected and those who wanted to stop new infections. The latter were more concerned to preach the message of safe sex and make condoms widely available, so that people could practise what was preached. Gradually, however, activists on both sides realised that the drugs, by almost abolishing the virus from a sufferer’s body, also render him unlikely to pass it on. They are, in other words, a dual-use technology."


Via Seth Dixon
Christian Allié's insight:
Seth Dixon's insight:

The article in the Economist points to the successes the international scientific community has made to minimize the impact of AIDS, but some doctors have wondered, "but what if AIDS didn't impact the wealthy and politically active?"  In this op-ed, a doctor says that medicine is just for those that can afford it because many pharmaceutical companies aren't interested in developing treatments for tropical diseases.


C Allié

.......... 

We need to find new ways of paying for research that do not force a choice between developing a drug and making it widely available. This idea is nothing extraordinary; there are already alternative ideas out there - models such as prize funds - that reward new discoveries through substantial financial payouts, paid on the condition that the drug is immediately open to price-lowering market competition.

 

There comes a time when we need to collectively look at a system and realise that it is no longer fit for purpose. Current R&D models for new medicines are not working; not for the world's poor, nor for you and I. It is time to get angry, to demand change. The poor are no longer far away, passive and prepared to die slowly of an illness we can cure. They demand change and so should everyone.

 

Dr Manica Balasegaram is the Executive Director of Medecins Sans Frontieres' Access Campaign; based in Geneva, he helps campaign for better tools and access to medicines, particularly for the developing world. He has worked as a doctor in MSF field projects in Uganda, Sudan, Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, India and Bangladesh.

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2014/03/medicine-just-those-who-can-aff-201431181911299288.html

more...
Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:22 PM

As the article states, the AIDS virus was not known to the science community during the diseases' first years of emergance, but thanks to science, research was put on the forefront to stop AIDS. Unfortunately, the Disease is still incurable, but as the author says, some cases of the virus disappearing from the sufferers' body, it gives hope that a cure may be found someday. The AIDs virus will always be a hot topic and is referred to as the "Political" disease and must pose a threat to rich people in order for the pharmaceutical companies to develop cures.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:52 AM

This article discusses the recent treatments and their success in treating AIDs. For many years AIDs spread rapidly across Africa and even today it still spreads, luckily two things have begun to slow down it's advance. Both the increase in the use of contraception such as condoms which protect against AIDs as well as the production of antibiotics  made available to many at risk of AIDs. This shows that with decent government backing it is possible to stem outbreaks such as this.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 28, 3:13 PM

In the late 1990s, it is estimated that 15 million of people had died because of AIDS in Africa. As all social classes were  affected by the virus, even political figures, many international organizations and private businesses were integrated into research treatment. However, the main obstacle in combating this disease is that there is not enough money to fund the necessary treatment for people in many African countries. Although, many organizations have embarked on campaigns regarding how to prevent this dreadful disease from spreading further and these efforts have proved successful in the past decade.

De Natura Rerum
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Christian Allié
Scoop.it!

10 of most invasive fish species in the world

10 of most invasive fish species in the world | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
When looking at the health of underwater ecosystems, these foreign invaders top the list of world's most unwanted.
Christian Allié's insight:

.............."""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""..............

 

Humans are experts at helping species move from their native habitat into new territory. Sometimes, the new habitat suits the invader so well that the results are catastrophic for local species. This is true on land as well as in the water. Ecosystems around the world have been dramatically altered as fish species are shifted around, whether for commercial fishing stock or the aquarium trade. When the fish are let loose or escape, a cascade of changes often follows, sometimes causing significant deforestation, an upheaval in the economy, or the decline of species that live above water.

These species are some of the most hearty and adaptable, and therefore the most invasive on the planet. Most of these species are so destructive that they are listed on the Global Invasive Species Database of 100 of the World's Worst Invasive Alien Species.

 

Here are 10 fish species that are wreaking havoc around the globe.


Read more: http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/stories/10-most-invasive-fish-species-world#ixzz3hIeq6sco[... ]
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Les oiseaux au gré du vent
Scoop.it!

La directive européenne sur la protection des oiseaux porte ses fruits

La directive européenne sur la protection des oiseaux porte ses fruits | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
La directive européenne sur la protection des oiseaux a un impact positif pour les espèces menacées. Les oiseaux bénéficiant d'une protection renforcée, survivent de mieux en mieux et leur population est même en croissance, révèle une étude de l'association BirdLife International, de l'organisation britannique Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) et de l'Université de Durham (Angleterre).

Via Pescalune
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Les colocs du jardin
Scoop.it!

Moins de béton, moins de dépressions - GuruMeditation

Moins de béton, moins de dépressions - GuruMeditation | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it

Une nouvelle étude a trouvé des preuves quantifiables qui soutiennent l’idée, Ô combien appréciable, qu’une promenade dans la nature pourrait réduire les risques de dépression (liés, peut-être, à votre trop grand matérialisme). Votre Guru est persuadé avoir déjà décrit une étude ayant les mêmes conclusions, impossible à retrouver…

L’étude a constaté que les personnes qui marchaient pendant 90 minutes dans une zone naturelle, par opposition aux participants qui marchaient dans un milieu urbain à fort trafic (El Camino Real à Palo Alto, en Californie, une rue bruyante de trois à quatre voies dans les deux sens), ont montré une diminution de l’activité dans la région ventro-médiane du cortex préfrontal, une région du cerveau active pendant la “rumination” (pensées répétitives axées sur des émotions négatives).

 

L’étude publiée dans The Proceedings of the National Academy of Science : Nature experience reduces rumination and subgenual prefrontal cortex activation.

                     


Via Bernadette Cassel
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Gaia Diary
Scoop.it!

Resurrection plants

Resurrection plants | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Will life-forms that can survive a century without water help us develop resilient crops for a drought-ridden future?
The post Resurrection plants appeared first on Aeon Magazine.

Via Mariaschnee
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Allié
Scoop.it!

INRA - champignons-fraises

INRA - champignons-fraises | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Mieux connaître les interactions entre champignons et bactéries bénéfiques pour la plante est un axe essentiel en agriculture durable. Dans le cadre d’une thèse, l’UMR Agroécologie de Dijon et l’Universita Del Piemonte Orientale ont étudié les interactions du couple champignon-bactérie sur la croissance et la qualité de la fraise.
Christian Allié's insight:

................."""""""""""""""""""""""""".............

 

[ ... ]

........ 

Rhizophagus irregularis : un champignon mycorhizien bénéfique pour la croissance du fraisier

Les gloméromycètes, champignons connus pour leurs symbioses de type mycorhizes à arbuscules, vivent avec un grand nombre de plantes. Leurs effets ont été observés non seulement au niveau du système racinaire mais aussi au niveau des feuilles, des fleurs et des fruits. Grâce aux échanges nutritionnels entre champignons et plante, la symbiose exerce un impact sur certaines caractéristiques des fruits charnus : teneur en minéraux, en acides aminés, en antioxydants, en caroténoïdes, en sucres et composés volatils.

Effet de la conjugaison de mycorhizes à arbuscules avec des rhizobactéries de type PGPR

Sur une période de 2 ans, les travaux ont visé à comprendre l’effet de R. irregularis lors d’interactions multitrophiques naturelles au niveau de la rhizosphère, sur la production et la qualité de la fraise. Diverses rhizobactéries promotrices de croissance des plantes ont été testées en conditions semi-contrôlées. Les résultats ont montré l’effet bénéfique d’une co-inoculation de R. irregularis et de Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf4, sur le rendement et la qualité du fruit.

Distribution du sucre dans les fruits : mécanisme et acteurs moléculaires

[ ... ]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Allié
Scoop.it!

Aux confins du pôle Nord, Spitzberg, sentinelle du réchauffement climatique

Aux confins du pôle Nord, Spitzberg, sentinelle du réchauffement climatique | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
L'île principale de l'archipel norvégien de Svalbard est devenue un poste avancé de la recherche sur le réchauffement climatique : des scientifiques du monde entier y observent l'intensification de la chute des glaces.
Christian Allié's insight:

.............""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""".............

 

........

Rattaché à la Norvège en 1920 et baptisé depuis Svalbard – le terme Spitzberg ne désignant plus alors qu’une partie du tout –, l’archipel témoigne aujourd’hui d’une nouvelle relation mêlant l’homme à la nature. Un climat extrême a longtemps dicté sa loi aux quelque 2 500 personnes qui s’y sont installées – essentiellement dans la capitale, Longyearbyen. Désormais, cette région est frappée de plein fouet par les effets du réchauffement climatique dû à l’homme.
[ ... ]
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Allié
Scoop.it!

Camera trick reveals black leopard's invisible spots - Futurity

Camera trick reveals black leopard's invisible spots - Futurity | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Infrared cameras tricked into staying in "night mode" show that black leopards have spots. The discovery could help save the endangered animal.
Christian Allié's insight:

.............""""""""""""""""""""""""".............

 

[ ... ]

..... 

Opposite of albinism

The black coloration known as melanism—the over development of dark-colored pigment in the skin and the opposite of albinism—makes it nearly impossible to identify individual animals. For this reason leopard populations in Peninsular Malaysia have been difficult to study.

Ecologists can now use the spots to identify different animals and begin to estimate the population size of the species.

“Because their uniformly black color prevented us from identifying individual animals and thereby estimating their population sizes, very little was known about leopards in Malaysia,” says Mark Rayan Darmaraj, who manages a WWF-Malaysia tiger conservation project.

The researchers tested the technique in the Kenyir wildlife corridor in north-eastern Peninsular Malaysia.

“We found we could accurately identify 94 percent of the animals. This will allow us to study and monitor this population over time, which is critical for its conservation,” Hedges says.

The researchers now hope to use their new method to study black leopards elsewhere.

“Some places in Peninsular Malaysia where I have used automatic cameras have lots of prey and forest cover but evidently very few leopards,” says Ahimsa Campos Arceiz.

Widespread poaching seems the most likely explanation: Leopard skins and body parts are increasingly showing up in wildlife trading markets in places such as on the Myanmar-China border.

 

Researchers from James Cook University contributed to the study, which is published in the Journal of Wildlife Management.

 

Source: University of Nottingham

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Allié
Scoop.it!

Notes From Kenya: MSU Hyena Research

Notes From Kenya: MSU Hyena Research | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Michigan State University zoology students in the Kay Holekamp Lab blog about their experiences studying spotted hyenas in Kenya.
Christian Allié's insight:

..................."""""""""""""""""""""""""""""".................

 

........... 

Thanks to you all!It is with enormous gratitude that I write this post, which we hope will be the last in our series about the great flood of 2015. I have literally been moved to tears many times in the past couple of weeks seeing how many people have made donations to our “wetting registry” on the MyRegistry.com site. And we have not even ever even met most of our donors in person! I never expected to see such an overwhelmingly positive response, so I have been both stunned and delighted. Hyena camp is slowly coming together again, thanks to all of you and the heroic efforts of my students and camp staff. It will be quite a while yet before we get back to the same level of function we enjoyed before the flood, but the truly miraculous thing from my point of view is that, thanks to your generous contributions to our flood relief efforts, it is now clear that we WILL be able to get back to that level before too much longer, and I will NOT be forced to c lose the hyena project down for good. The Talek River has returned to its normal shallow, sleepy creek-like state, and one would never guess from looking at it now that it could ever rage so ferociously, or wreak such extraordinary havoc, in only a few hours as it did on the night of 13 June. The flood now seems like little more than a terrifying nightmare. The dry season has finally arrived here, and the plains are already turning brown and dusty.  Small groups of wildebeest have started to arrive in the Talek area so our hyenas are feasting on them every night. Our most interesting post-flood discovery to date has been the indication from the unusual behavior of our study animals that the enormous Talek clan may at last be ready to fission permanently into two or three new daughter clans. Student bloggers will undoubtedly keep you posted about that as the new social situation becomes clearer. For the moment, suffice it to say that I am very deeply grateful to all of our readers and friends of the hyena project who have made donations that will allow us to keep the project going.Again, thanks to you all!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Persea, Pour une Terre Vivante
Scoop.it!

Petite histoire commentée du rapport de l’Homme à la nature

Petite histoire commentée du rapport de l’Homme à la nature | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Homme et nature : l’indispensable réconciliation Il y a un peu plus d’un an, la Fédération Inter-Environnement Wallonie (IEW est un peu l'équivalent de France Nature Environnement en Belgique) organisait son Université d’automne sur le thème « Homme et nature : l’indispensable réconciliation ». Plusieurs aspects de la relation entre...

Via Baudouin de Menten, sesheta
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Outre-mer alertes environnement
Scoop.it!

Le changement climatique dans le Pacifique - YouTube

L'astrophysicien américain Neil deGrasse Tyson présente le travail du Projet d’adaptation au changement climatique dans le Pacifique (ACCP). Les nations du P...

Via Isa Guillard
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Fragments of Science
Scoop.it!

Plants make big decisions with microscopic cellular competition

Plants make big decisions with microscopic cellular competition | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Like other multicellular creatures, plants must coordinate activity among many different types of cells and tissues. Messages, demands, warnings and alerts shuttle among cells near and far. These messages determine what jobs cells take on and how they work together to build and maintain tissues and organs. A team of researchers has identified a mechanism that some plant cells use to receive complex and contradictory messages from their neighbors.

Via Mariaschnee
Christian Allié's insight:

................""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""...................

 

[ ... ]

......

'The cell has these competing signals that it has to interpret, and it uses the same surface protein for both,' said Torii. This type of signal delivery system -- where two opposing messages compete directly for access to the same proteins -- exists in animals. But this type of antagonistic signaling has never been seen in plants, she added.

This is a particularly surprising finding because Stomagen and EPF2 look very similar to one another. They differ in only a few key qualities. Yet those small differences amount to big differences in the messages they deliver to cells.

The discovery sheds light on the mechanisms that cells employ to detect and process messages -- including conflicting signals -- from the outside world. In the future, Torii would like to understand how the pro-stomata and anti-stomata messages act once they're inside plant cells.

'This paper is just the beginning,' she said.

 

Lee, who conducted this research as a postdoctoral fellow in Torii's lab, is now an assistant professor of biology at Concordia University in Montreal. Other co-authors are Marketa Hnilova with the UW's Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Biology researchers Michal Maes, Ya-Chen Lisa Lin, Aarthi Putarjunan, Soon-Ki Han and Julian Avila.

 

This research was funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (GBMF3035).

 

Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of Washington. The original item was written by James Urton. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Gaia Diary
Scoop.it!

VIDEO: A Sea Turtle's Perspective of the Great Barrier Reef

VIDEO: A Sea Turtle's Perspective of the Great Barrier Reef | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
This video is the only way you'll see the Great Barrier Reef through the eyes of a sea turtle. It's also a reminder that the reef is facing serious threats.

Via Mariaschnee
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Allié
Scoop.it!

Des fleurs aux odeurs putrides, pour quoi faire ?

Des fleurs aux odeurs putrides, pour quoi faire ? | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
C'est l'été, les jardins sont en pleine floraison avec peut-être, de magnifiques roses aux parfums enivrants ? Nous humains, apprécions particulièrement les jolies fleurs aux couleurs vives qui sentent si bon ! Une belle stratégie pour attirer les pollinisateurs... On n'attire pas les mouches avec du vinaigre ! Quoi que ! Effectivement parfois, c'est tout le contraire car, ne vous en déplaise, certaines fleurs émettent des odeurs nauséabondes, fétides, proches de ce que peuvent dégager les cadavres en cours de putréfaction. Je voulais évoquer certaines d'entre elles aujourd'hui : ellesi présentent en plus un autre point commun : elles sont gigantesques. Il s'agit par exemple des fleurs de la famille des Rafflesia et la fleur de l'Arum Titan. Une fleur de Rafflesia C'est vrai qu'on est assez loin des images édulcorées de jolies petites fleurs qui dégagent des parfums enivrants... Mais à chacun son truc : chaque espèce, selon l'environnement dans lequel elle vit, les moyens dont elle
Christian Allié's insight:

................"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""..................

 

 

[ ... ]

 

Les plantes de la famille « Rafflesia »

..........

L’évolution semble aussi avoir favorisé ce type de plantes capables d’imiter visuellement (couleur et grandeur) et olfactivement des corps en décomposition.

Quelles sont les molécules responsables des odeurs nauséabondes (pour l’homme) mais irrésistibles (pour la mouche) ?
Les composés identifiés sont légions. Mais celles qui détiennent le palmarès de l’attraction des diptères sont :
- le p-crésol (qu’on retrouve dans les déjections des vaches car cette molécule est issue de la coupure de protéines),
- l’acide butanoïque (l’odeur forte du beurre rance, le parmesan, ou le vomi)
- le 3-méthyl indole ou scatol (naturellement présent dans les excréments, métabolite d’un des acides aminés constituants les protéines, sachant qu’à faible concentration il a une -bonne- odeur florale)

- les methyl (mono-di ou tri) sulfures, produits finaux de décomposition des protéines.

[ ... ]

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Carnets de plongée
Scoop.it!

De la vie intraterrestre sous les fonds marins

De la vie intraterrestre sous les fonds marins | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Alors que tous les yeux sont tournés vers l'espace à la recherche de vie extraterrestre ou d'exoplanètes habitables, des écosystèmes entiers restent inexploré

Via Francis Le Guen
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Les colocs du jardin
Scoop.it!

Le grand bétonnage, une bombe climatique

Le grand bétonnage, une bombe climatique | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it

"Aéroport de Notre-Dame-des-Landes, Center Parcs, autoroutes, zones d’activités commerciales : au nom du développement de l’activité économique, l’État mène une politique de destruction du territoire aux conséquences irréversibles. L’effet sur le climat est catastrophique : selon un calcul inédit de Mediapart, 100 millions de tonnes de CO2 sont émises chaque année, soit près de 20 % de toutes les émissions nationales, par ce bétonnage endémique."


Par Jade Linfgaard. Mediapart, 27.07.2015


Via Bernadette Cassel
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from La Cabane aux Arômes
Scoop.it!

L'achillée millefeuille

Le nom de l'achillée millefeuille (Achillea millefollium), ou herbe à la dinde, fait référence au héros Achille et à ses feuilles finement divisées. Les Âmes...

Via Pescalune
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Risques naturels et technologiques infos
Scoop.it!

Au Canada, un lac est littéralement sur le point de tomber d’une falaise

Au Canada, un lac est littéralement sur le point de tomber d’une falaise | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Dans les mois à venir, la digue de terre qui retient l'eau d'un lac des Territoires du Nord-Ouest du Canada pourrait se rompre. Des dizaines de milliers de mètres cubes d'eau pourraient alors se déverser du haut d'une falaise, inondant la vallée voisine. L'Équipe de surveillance géologique des Territoires du Nord-Ouest prévient que ce petit lac, situé près de la ville de Fort McPherson — où habite la communauté Gwich'in — devrait « se vider de manière catastrophique en 2015, causant une inondation subite et créant potentiellement un torrent de débris. »

Si le hameau voisin n'est pas directement menacé par la potentielle inondation, les scientifiques expliquent que la destruction de ce petit lac est une illustration criante des conséquences des changements climatiques, qui altèrent les conditions environnementales en Alaska, en Sibérie et à la pointe nord du Canada.

Via Uston News, Sylvain Rotillon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Biodiversité
Scoop.it!

Un fossile de serpent à quatre pattes intrigue les scientifiques

Un fossile de serpent à quatre pattes intrigue les scientifiques | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it

Une découverte qui soulève de nombreuses questions. Un fossile de serpent doté de quatre pattes, un spécimen unique, suggère que les ancêtres de ces reptiles avaient une origine terrestre et non marine, selon une étude publiée jeudi dans la revue américaine Science.

 

Via Hubert MESSMER @Zehub on Twitter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Biodiversité
Scoop.it!

Les moustiques utilisent trois sens pour vous piquer

Les moustiques utilisent trois sens pour vous piquer | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
C'est la conclusion d'une nouvelle étude américaine. Elle démontre que ces insectes ont évolué pour mieux traquer les humains. 

Via Hubert MESSMER @Zehub on Twitter
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Allié
Scoop.it!

Non, transformer la nature en monnaie ne peut pas la sauver

Non, transformer la nature en monnaie ne peut pas la sauver | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Avec Faut-il donner un prix à la nature ?, Jean Gadrey et Aurore Lalucq nous offrent des pages très claires sur un sujet technique. S’appuyant sur des exemples concrets, et avec une honnêteté à laquelle il faut rendre hommage, ils dressent un bilan de l’efficacité de la monétarisation de la nature dans le monde, pour conclure que 'l’évaluation monétaire de la nature ne peut en aucune façon constituer l’outil dominant d’une politique de préservation de la nature'.

Si la Conférence de Paris sur le climat (...)
Christian Allié's insight:

...........""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""...........

 

[ ... ]

......... 

Pour enfoncer le clou les auteurs s’interrogent sur la réalité du prix d’une forêt. Selon qu’elle est privée ou publique, qu’elle est exploitée pour son bois ou pour le gibier qu’elle abrite, qu’il s’agit d’une forêt primaire ou d’une forêt industrielle, qu’elle a une histoire ou pas… sa valeur variera du tout au tout. « Dans ce cas comme dans d’autres, il est illusoire de vouloir attribuer un prix à la nature », font-ils valoir.

Dire cela c’est mette le doigt sur une vérité trop souvent occultée : affecter un prix à la nature (ou à une composante de celle-ci) n’est qu’une construction artificielle, sans réelle valeur scientifique quoiqu’en disent de brillants esprits. Si les économistes ont malgré tout réussi à imposer cette notion, c’est dans un contexte historique et idéologique précis, celui qui a vu, à partir de la fin des années 1980 et la chute du mur de Berlin, le triomphe du marché et du libéralisme.

Auparavant, les gouvernements privilégiaient la norme, la règle avec une logique administrative contraignante ; aujourd’hui que l’économisme triomphe, le marché et la monétarisation de la nature s’imposent comme des articles de foi. D’où la création de ces outils financiers que sont « les droits à polluer » sous quelque forme qu’ils existent (marché carbone, écotaxes, bio-banques, etc.). Au final, tout s’achète et tout se vend, y compris le droit d’empoisonner la terre et ceux qui l’habitent.

Un bilan décevant

Pour quels résultats ? Dans des pages très claires, Jean Gadrey et Aurore Lalucq dressent un bilan de l’efficacité de la monétarisation de la nature à travers une dizaine d’exemples. Avec une honnêteté à laquelle il faut rendre hommage ils concluent que dans quelques cas bien précis le résultat semble positif. Aux Etats-Unis, le mécanisme d’échange de quotas d’émissions de dioxyde de soufre et d’oxyde d’azote, mis en place il y a une vingtaine d’années pour lutter contre les pluies acides, a donné de bons résultats.

Mais l’Europe a fait mieux, précisent-ils, en imposant des normes plus sévères aux industriels, sans passer par le marché. En Suède, qui a instauré de longue date une taxe carbone (d’un montant élevé), « les résultats semblent bons », reconnaissent également les auteurs. Dans les autres pays, en revanche, le bilan est décevant.

Au final, concluent Jean Gadrey et Aurore Lalucq, l’expérience prouve que, plutôt que de s’en remettre au sacro-saint marché et à la finance, la sauvegarde de la nature est avant tout affaire d’éducation, de démocratie, de pédagogie et de temps.

« L’évaluation monétaire de la nature ne peut en aucune façon constituer l’outil dominant d’une politique de préservation de la nature, écrivent-ils au terme de l’ouvrage. Elle doit être un outil d’aide à la décision, parfois elle constitue une partie de la solution, mais en aucun cas elle n’est la recette miracle mise en avant par les libéraux. »

 

# Livre "Faut-il donner un prix à la nature?"

http://www.lespetitsmatins.fr/collections/faut-il-donner-un-prix-a-la-nature/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Allié
Scoop.it!

Canal du midi, les platanes qu'on abat / France Inter

Canal du midi, les platanes qu'on abat / France Inter | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Le Canal du Midi : c’est l’un des joyaux paysagers et touristiques de la France. Il est inscrit depuis 1996 au patrimoine de l’Humanité établi par l’UNESCO. Mais aujourd’hui, sa parure est en danger.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Allié
Scoop.it!

Une oasis de biodiversité retrouvée en mer du Nord

Une oasis de biodiversité retrouvée en mer du Nord | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
Jeudi, l'Institut royal des sciences naturelles de Belgique (IRSNB) a annoncé la redécouverte d'une zone riche en vie sous-marine en mer du Nord. La faune y prospère comme il y a cent ans. Buccins, troques et araignées de mer s'épanouissent dans ces îlots miraculeusement préservés.
Christian Allié's insight:

.................""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""..................

 

......... La partie belge de la mer du Nord se compose principalement de bancs de sable. Entre ces bancs, on trouve des lits de graviers: des zones recouvertes de pierres plus ou moins grandes. Au siècle dernier, Gustave Gilson, pionnier de l'océanographie belge, constate que ces zones accueillent une riche biodiversité, très différente de celle observée sur les bancs de sable.

Ces lits servaient de frayères - zone où les poissons viennent pondre leurs oeufs - aux poissons, notamment aux harengs. Au fil du temps, ces zones ont été appauvries par la pêche. Les pierres ont été déplacées ou remontées à bord avec les prises des pêcheurs, privant les espèces de leur habitat naturel.

[ ... ]

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Allié
Scoop.it!

The story of consumption | FERN

The story of consumption | FERN | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it

#Film #Nature #Help

Christian Allié's insight:

.....................""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""".....................

 

This film shows how we can turn around years of damaging policies and build an EU where all timber and agricultural products are produced legally, sustainably and in countries that respect communities’ rights to their land.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Gaia Diary
Scoop.it!

This May Be The Most Beautiful River On Earth

This May Be The Most Beautiful River On Earth | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
If the Soca river in Slovenia isn't the most beautiful river on this planet, it is most certainly in the running. Nicknamed "The Emerald Beauty," it has appeared in multiple well-known poe

Via Mariaschnee
more...
oliviersc's comment, July 14, 12:15 PM
Voici qui me semble pas mal retouché, non ?...
Christian Allié's comment, July 14, 12:36 PM
Possible ...sympa quoi qu'il en soit ....
Rescooped by Christian Allié from Gaia Diary
Scoop.it!

Carnivorous plants communicate with bats

Carnivorous plants communicate with bats | De Natura Rerum | Scoop.it
A large, meat-eating pitcher plant in Borneo has evolved a unique way to communicate with bats that it hopes to attract.

Via Mariaschnee
Christian Allié's insight:

..............""""""""""""""""""""""""............

 

[ ... ]

 

......

Suspecting that echolocation was involved, the scientists used an artificial biomimetic bat head that emits and records ultrasounds to test the pitcher plant's acoustic reflectivity from different positions and angles.

The experiments uncovered a strong echo reflection from the plant's back walls, where the shape works perfectly as an effective reflector.

Subsequent behavioural experiments showed that the bats respond to those sounds echoed back to them from the plants.

Bats were better at finding partially hidden pitcher plants when their reflectors were intact than when the reflector had been reduced.

The bats also chose pitcher plants more often as the best places to roost when the reflector had not been reduced.

The study answers a longstanding question about these particular plants: Why don't they feast on many insects versus what other pitcher plants do?

As it turns out, they don't have to, given all of the nutrient-rich bat poo nearby.

The study further adds to the growing body of research showing that plants can solve complex problems without having a brain.

[ ... ]

 

more...
No comment yet.