De Informatieprof...
Find tag "Internet"
302 views | +0 today
De Informatieprofessional
Informatie over en voor bibliotheek- en informatieprofessionals in een netwerksamenleving
Curated by Annemarijs
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Annemarijs from 21st Century Libraries!

The End Of The Library - TechCrunch

The End Of The Library - TechCrunch | De Informatieprofessional |
The End Of The Library
A simple link. That's all it took to unleash a hailstorm of angry emails, messages, tweets, and comments. Why? I dared wonder if libraries will continue to exist in the future.

Via Dr. Steve Matthews
Annemarijs's insight:

MG Siegler verwacht het einde van de (openbare) bibliotheken oa door  "The internet has replaced the importance of libraries as a repository for knowledge. And digital distribution has replaced the role of a library as a central hub for obtaining the containers of such knowledge: books. And digital bits have replaced the need to cut down trees to make paper and waste ink to create those books. This is evolution, not devolution. " en door de veel te hoge verwerkingskosten van eBooks in de US. Hij krijgt veel kritische commentaren.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Annemarijs from Curation & The Future of Publishing!

Curation Is The New Black; But Will It Get In The Black?

Curation Is The New Black; But Will It Get In The Black? | De Informatieprofessional |

"There’s a lot of talk about content curation; but is anyone making money?" asks Deanna Dahlsad on her blog. 


Though I can assure her we have plans to make some at (we've had premium offers from day 1 and they're ramping up very nicely), her focus is actually more on the curators themselves.


How can individual curators make money? She's not talking about brands or businesses who have an opportunity to get brand awareness or thought leadership out of this. She means the individuals who are willing to become professional curators and need to make some revenue  to justify it. Like some bloggers do. 


As I've outlined before, I think the answer will come from a mix of advertising (which can be promoted posts or sponsoring) and subscription revenue. This is not an original answer but we're starting to see some of our users do that:

- Check out for an example of a sponsored topic;

- Some others want to be paid by their clients for their curation work and start to implement our privacy feature for that reason.


But maybe this picture needs to be looked at in a bigger way: in itself, blogging isn't either a massive revenue generation opportunity. There aren't that many blogging millionaires who make a fortune purely out of subscribing people to their blogs or selling ads on it. But most of the time, they're able to combine some direct revenue with offline or other services that their blogs help position and thus contribute to sell. 


Isn't combining that Content Marketing aspect of Curation with some direct revenue-generation the real winning bundle for Curators? What do you think?

Via Deanna Dahlsad, Guillaume Decugis
Brian Yanish -'s comment, October 3, 2012 8:31 AM
Indirectly I've monetized my use of by driving traffic to my websites. I'm working on a whitepaper that will explain how. Right now I'm still gathering analyitic results for it.
Guillaume Decugis's comment, October 3, 2012 9:37 PM
Looking forward to read that Brian! I'm curious what you guys think of a solution like - we've been exchanging with their founders on whether it could be a good solution for our users or not. Nothing decided yet but as we're discussing monetization, I'd love to have your thoughts (or anybody else's interested in that).
Brian Yanish -'s comment, October 5, 2012 1:16 AM
I've always wondered about the legal part of putting ads with curated content. Say I scoop a New York Times article word for word and there is an ad displayed on with the copied article.
Rescooped by Annemarijs from The Information Professional!

Practical Tips For Online Privacy | LISNews - from a librarian's perspective


"Staying Safe Online" that will cover a million and one tips on how to keep you and your computer safe.

Privacy is a relative term. That is, the things that I consider important to my privacy, someone else might not care about. As librarians we usually key in on Confidentiality Threats. We want our patrons records safe. We also don't share that information with ANYONE else. In general, we are fierce about protecting our patrons’ privacy. This is something that has always set us apart from everyone else. Amazon won't do it. Google won't do it. Do I even need to say Facebook won't do it? People who come into the library or use our web sites don't worry about what's going to happen with their information (or at least they shouldn't need worry about it). They should know we are doing our best to guard their privacy. Keeping all our IT resources secure should be a large part of guarding that privacy."

Via Karen du Toit
No comment yet.