Days of Significance: Identity and Place in Australian History
36 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Isaac Graham
Scoop.it!

HSIE Outcome Links and Content Overview

HSIE Outcome Links and Content Overview | Days of Significance: Identity and Place in Australian History | Scoop.it

Stage 3 - Change and Continuity

 

Significant Events and People

CCS3.1 - Explains the significance of particular people, places, groups, actions and events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage.

 

Time and Change

CCS3.2 - Explains the development of the principles of Australian democracy.

 

Subject Matter

Origins of dedicated days, weeks, events and places, including Anzac Day, Australia Day and Remembrance Day

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Isaac Graham
Scoop.it!

AIATSIS: Commemorating the Freedom Ride

AIATSIS: Commemorating the Freedom Ride | Days of Significance: Identity and Place in Australian History | Scoop.it

Inspired by the Freedom Rides of the United States in 1961, a group of 29 students from the University of Sydney undertook a bus trip to a number of towns in New South Wales from 12 to 26 February 1965

Isaac Graham's insight:

A great collection of information, resources and links about the 1965 Freedom Ride through regional NSW by a group of University of Sydney students to protest the treatment and segregation of Aboriginal Australians. This topic links nicely to the syllabus outcomes CCS3.1 (events that have shaped Australian identity) and CCS3.2 (the development of the principles of Australian democracy), with a particular focus on “Key/figures or events that have enhanced democratic rights” which also links to the Australia Democracy, Units of Work (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 115). The website itself is very well laid out using a logical before, during and after structure which might work well to frame a series of lessons on the topic.

 

Perhaps the strongest part of this website however is the extensive range of primary sources about the Freedom Rides, many of which could be used to generate activities or assessment tasks. On the “planning the ride” page for example there are two questionnaires used during the Freedom Rides. In small groups students could examine some of the language used in the original document and how it has changed. Students might also come up with their own modern day questionnaire which explores some of the contemporary issues faced by Indigenous Australians or plan their own Freedom Ride about another issue such as the treatment of refugees in Australia.

 

Reading the original press release is a great way for students to get a “behind the scenes” look into to the processes of journalism and producing their own might be a good assessment task to link to their own Freedom Ride idea. There are also some opportunities to engage with mapping skills by mapping out the original Freedom Ride and thinking about some of the difficulties a journey like this might have had in 1965.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Isaac Graham
Scoop.it!

Creative Spirits: Australia Day or Invasion Day?

Creative Spirits: Australia Day or Invasion Day? | Days of Significance: Identity and Place in Australian History | Scoop.it

Take a look beyond the stereotypes and discover what Aboriginal life is like today - from arts and land to sport and spirituality.

Isaac Graham's insight:

The Creative Spirits website offers a number of interesting insights into contemporary Aboriginal culture through an exploration of various topics including art, sport, culture, health and history. The link below offers content relating to Australia Day/Invasion Day from an Aboriginal perspective, highlighting the conflicting nature of January 26 as a day of celebration for some and mourning for others. It gives a brief historical background to Australia Day before explaining why the annual celebration is problematic for the Aboriginal population. One thing I didn’t know about Australia Day which I discovered from this website was that re-enactments of Captain Arthur Phillip’s landing were produced up until 1988.

 

The website contains a number of case studies and videos for students and teachers to explore. Of particular interest was a music video by David Benuik called “January 26 – Why Pick a Day of Tragedy?” which draw a comparison between celebrating Australia Day to celebrating well known Australian tragedies such as Cyclone Tracy and the Black Saturday bush fires. I think the playing this song to a class would be a good way to introduce and problematize students' traditional understandings of Australia Day. There could also be a great discussion about the presentation style of this song (Traditional, Anglo-Celtic, Australian folk) and the message it conveys. A great assessment for this resource would be to host a class debate with the question: “Should we move Australia Day?”

 

Although the information on this website is quite good it is unfortunately somewhat cluttered and disorderly. It also offers teachers and student’s opportunities to discuss issues of authorship. It is revealed on the “About Creative Spirits” page that the author is actually of German-Australian decent and does not identify as an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander but clearly is passionate about informing people about Aboriginal culture, history and issues. Some discussions might include: “How is this problematic?” or “Does this make the website less reliable?”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Isaac Graham
Scoop.it!

Paul Keating: The Unknown Soldier Eulogy

Paul Keating: The Unknown Soldier Eulogy | Days of Significance: Identity and Place in Australian History | Scoop.it

Audio of the oration by then Prime Minister Paul Keating at the internment of the Unknown Soldier at the Australian War Memorial in November 1993.

Isaac Graham's insight:

This audio recording of Prime Minister Paul Keating’s eulogy of the Unknown Australian Soldier is a stirring and fitting introduction to teaching students about Remembrance Day. This speech was delivered on Remembrance Day (November 11), 1993 to mark 75 years since the armistice that ended World War One. Following in the traditions of the United Kingdom and France, the Australian government recovered and transported the unidentified body of an Australian soldier killed during World War One back to Australia to be interred at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra. The Unknown Australian Soldier “represents all Australians who have been killed in war” (Australian War Memorial, n.d.).

 

Keating’s speech (transcript available at http://www.awm.gov.au/commemoration/keating.asp) offers great opportunities to explore the “people, places, groups, actions and events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage” (CCS3.1) and the “development of the principles of Australian democracy” (CCS3.2) (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 63).  Keating’s introduction highlights that the Unknown Australian Soldier not only represents every soldier lost at war but, in many ways, represents our own Australian identity; a diverse nation of people living in a variety of locations with different backgrounds, religious affiliations and networks. It also explores themes of equality, togetherness and triumph over adversity, themes that lie at the core of Australian democracy; “We have gained a legend: a story of bravery and sacrifice and, with it, a deeper faith in ourselves and our democracy, and a deeper understanding of what it means to be Australian (Keating, 1993)”.

 

There are a number of great activities and discussions that could be generated from Keating’s speech. Students could discuss or possibly debate reasons for going to war, which would be more interesting if the political and social context of the early 20th century was considered.  Another task might be to research ways other countries pay tribute to their unknown soldiers lost at war and perhaps explore some of the ways these countries use conflicts of the past to shape their contemporary identities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Isaac Graham
Scoop.it!

Behind The News: The Eureka Stockade

Behind The News: The Eureka Stockade | Days of Significance: Identity and Place in Australian History | Scoop.it

Today is a significant day and not just because it's the last BtN of the year. It's also the anniversary of a very famous event in Australia's history called the Eureka Stockade. Sarah visited Ballarat in Victoria to find out what it was and why it's so important.

Isaac Graham's insight:

The ABC program Behind the News (Episode 35, 2013) provides an excellent video report about The Eureka Rebellion at the link below. The story is centred on a group of students who visited Ballarat for a school excursion and learnt about the life of gold miners and their families during the mid-nineteenth century. The video offers a brief but insightful historical overview of the lead up to the Eureka Rebellion. There is a particular focus on the “development of the principles of Australian democracy” (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 60), which is seen through the emphasis on the granting of suffrage to miners following the rebellion.

 

This video would be a great supplementary or introductory resource to work with the “Gold!” Units of Work, particularly Learning Sequence 3 which relates directly to the Eureka stockade (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 115). This sequence has a particular focus on the people that shaped life in the gold fields such as the miners, the police and the military. A good activity, following a bit more research on the topic, might be to have students write a letter to someone back home (e.g. England or Melbourne etc.)  as though they were one of these characters. Another interesting activity might be to have student’s research the death of James Scobie (http://prov.vic.gov.au/whats-on/exhibitions/eureka-on-trial/murder-of-james-scobie) and to re-enact the subsequent trial of hotelier James Bentley, a process which may uncover some of the underlying tensions that lead to the Eureka Rebellion.

 

Alongside the Behind the News video the ABC also provides an excellent PDF of activities, overviews, links, and resources (http://www.abc.net.au/btn/resources/teacher/episode/20131203-eurekastockade.pdf) which could be implemented or altered by teachers to integrate with the “Gold!” Units of Work. There is also a quiz (http://www.abc.net.au/btn/quiz.htm?file=/btn/quiz/js/2013-35eurekastockade.js) which could have potential as a formative assessment task.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Isaac Graham
Scoop.it!

Australian War Memorial: ANZAC Diversity

Australian War Memorial: ANZAC Diversity | Days of Significance: Identity and Place in Australian History | Scoop.it

In telling the diverse stories of Australians who served in the First World War, the ANZAC Diversity project aims to encourage students to examine the ANZAC story from a fresh perspective.

Isaac Graham's insight:

The Australian War Memorial website contains a great selection of resources and activities about ANZAC diversity. It provides some excellent case studies about Australian soldiers  from Aboriginal, Chinese and Northern European backgrounds, providing opportunities for teachers to implement Aboriginal and multicultural perspectives  into lessons about ANZAC Day and the ANZAC tradition. Underneath each case study are a number of research and class discussion opportunities which provide good starting points for lesson planning and activity ideas.

 

In total there are twenty six case studies on the website, six from Northern European soldiers, nine from aboriginal soldiers and eleven from Chinese soldiers. Assuming a standard sized class this could potentially mean that each student is assigned their own case study with the role of researching and critically investigating the contributions of these soldiers to Australian heritage. Alternatively, by focussing on a smaller number of case studies small groups of two or three could be teamed up to encourage collaborative investigation.

 

Following on from this, a group oral report would be a good assessment task for student’s to consolidate and disseminate their research. Such a task may include a brief retelling of the soldier’s story, how this biography compares with more well-known ANZAC soldiers, and the ways that Aboriginal soldiers and soldiers from multicultural backgrounds helped shaped the Australian identity and ANZAC legacy. This is a great topic to talk about ANZAC day as it encourages students to “interpret information”, “respect alternative viewpoints”, and discuss “fundamental Australian ideals” such as “freedom from racial persecution” (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 63).

 

Although the information is well collated by the AWM, the only drawback is the website itself which is somewhat difficult to navigate, perhaps due to additional information being added periodically. This may mean extra time is required helping students navigate the site. Printing the required information is also an alternative.

more...
No comment yet.