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Portrait of the modern knowledge worker

Portrait of the modern knowledge worker | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
The concept of ‘knowledge worker’ which Peter Drucker coined in 1959, is perhaps not so clear (as shown again in a recent LinkedIn discussion - access potentially limited) and can be understood at ...

Via Jay Cross
David Bramley's insight:

A really interesting post that considers the concept of 'knowledge worker'.  In my experience, people usually relate 'knowledge' to content and the advent of search engines such as Google has devalued individual grasp of content.  However, the post focuses on gifts, skills and behaviours and how they can be used to be creative and innovative.  Well worth a read

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Jay Cross's curator insight, July 3, 2013 9:55 PM

Brilliant. Desired traits in the modern knowledge worker:

Gifts and skills:

A synthetic mind that can ingest a lot of information and summarise it in clear and concise ways, perhaps using mnemonics.A pair of intently listening ears and eagerly observing eyes to pick up the signals around (and question them);Outstanding interpersonal communication skills helping to get in touch with a variety of people (in the same field of expertise and beyond);An open heart giving the emotional capacity to connect with others at a deeper level and build trust authentically;Good speaking and writing skills allowing to express oneself articulately so as to share knowledge more effectively – both with other people verbally and in writing;The capacity to read quickly and to remember things well;Typing blindly to write more quickly;Ideally, good facilitation skills to be able to tease out knowledge and information from other people and apply/combine them – but that is just an extra.

Attitude:

An open, curious, humble mind that keeps inquiring about everything, and does not settle for finished, definitive answers – the way a child would do rather than a self-engrossed expert – to keep on learning;A true curiosity to try new things out and add them to an array of experiences;A vision of one’s own development pathway and next priorities;Reflecting continually: every day, week or after every significant event, taking the time to ponder what just happened and what could have been done better, perhaps following the after action review principles;Reflecting in single, double and triple-loop learning, in practice;An attitude of ‘documenting on the spot’ (typing as people speak, live blogging, taking pictures and videos as things happen etc.);A strong self-discipline to systematically act upon all the above and reflect to improve again.

 

Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations
Utilising social media to increase collaboration and create social capital
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PKM Book Alpha Version | Harold Jarche

PKM Book Alpha Version | Harold Jarche | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it

Emerging thoughts on Personal Knowledge Management...Please read this post and the link Seek, Sense Share, it could change your professional life for ever!

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A new theory of growth

For most of human history, creativity was held to be a privilege of supreme beings, first the gods who shaped the heavens and the earth. Then human beings who were the creators and not the helpless...
David Bramley's insight:

Any review of skills for now and the future will include creativity and innovation, but new, good ideas need to be passed on and developed.  This has always been the case:

 

"To say that Thomas Edison invented electricity or that Albert Einstein discovered relativity is a popular, but misleading simplification. These breakthroughs would have been inconceivable without (1) the social and intellectual network that stimulated and advanced their thinking and (2) without the people who recognized the value of their contributions and spread them further"


We can't all be Edison or Einstein, but today's social media tools mean that we have far greater opportunities to present and communicate our ideas...if we choose to use them! 


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Curation tools to help you cope with info-overload

Curation tools to help you cope with info-overload | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it

How Scoop.it, Google Plus & Twitter can turn chaos into order if you do anything professionally related to online technology, you understand the immense amount of data you need to sort through each day. 

David Bramley's insight:

A great example of personal knowledge management. It's important to try out a number of platforms to find out what suits you and where  the experts in your field are curating

 

if your interested in developing your personal knowledge management skills I'd recommend the Connected Workplace with Jane Hart and Harold Jarche: http://connectedworkplace.co.uk/workshops/

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The Top 5 Ways Enterprise Social Collaboration Can Boost Organizational Productivity

Social media has been revolutionizing the way people interact in their personal lives for years, and now it is changing the way they collaborate and connect in the workplace. To simply say enterprise social collaboration is Facebook or Twitter at work is a misconception and gives the impression that these tools are time-wasters that drain productivity. By thoughtfully integrating enterprise social collaboration, organizations can leverage social tools to improve employee engagement, bolster productivity and tap into a company''s collective intelligence.
David Bramley's insight:

for those new to enterprise social networks such as Yammer, Chatter, Jive etc., this is a great introduction to the potential benefits.  But it's not about the technology, it requires individuals to collaborate and cooperate by sharing what they are working on.

 

if you want to find out more search for "working out loud", John Stepper and "Seek, Sense, Share, Harold Jarche

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LSG Webinar: Next generation learning practices in the age of knowl...

Learning & Skills Group Webinar presentation, 6 March 2014
David Bramley's insight:

Slides from today's webinar, the recording will be on YouTube shortly on the LSG channel.

 

Thought provoking presentation that talks of 'learning the new', learning flow and activity streams.  The webinar is highly recommended

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#lt14uk interview: Nigel Paine on the ‘big shift’ in learning

#lt14uk interview: Nigel Paine on the ‘big shift’ in learning | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it

Responsibility for learning to shift to the learnerLearning must happen ‘all over the place’ – L&D are the facilitatorsOrganisations need to recognise work is learning and learning is work

David Bramley's insight:

This link provides a double win:

1.  A podcast featuring an overview of his keynote presentation at the Learning and Technology conference 2014 by Nigel Paine.  Nigel is former chief learning officer at the BBC and an L&D thought leader.  A view that struck a chord with me is that work is changing so rapidly that traditional L&D methods (including e-learning) are incapable of remaining current

2.  An introduction to LearnPatch who curate posts on workplace learning as well as creating original content

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Network performance is the single most important characteristic of successful employees

Network performance is the single most important characteristic of successful employees | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it

"The ability to do our work better based on the input of others, and to make others’ work better based on our contribution, is increasingly seen as the single most important characteristic of successful employees."

David Bramley's insight:

These are difficult times for business leaders.  Logic suggests that in difficult times you should focus on tried and tested methods of delivering organisational performance.  But these are chaotic times, where change is a fact of life rather than something to be managed.  There is a paradigm shift taking place that this post elequently describes, It requires us to develop new skills and measure an individuals value in a very different way 

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Embedding Learning in the Flow of Work

Presentation at WOLCE, World of Learning Conference & Exhibition, 1 October 2013
David Bramley's insight:

Brilliant presentation that demonstrates how work and learning are merging and the skills that are required to be an effective participant in your network.  In my experience this is a crucial message, as many people fail to see the link between work and learning.  I'm aware of organisations who have very active enterprise social networks (ESN's), but just see it as a form of communication not learning.

 

I really like this quote from Charles Jennings:

"Embedding learning in work isn't about adding learning to work, but extracting the learning from work"

This fits very well with the concept of the reflective practitioner...essentially, what you post in an ESN are reflections on what you are working on (in action) and the products of your work (on action).  Sharing this with colleagues makes it 360 degree reflection...assuming your colleagues take the time to collaborate.  The potential of this way of working to add value should not be underestimated

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Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future

Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future
David Bramley's insight:

Change is constant and content ubiquitous.  Traditional methods of Continuous Professional Development are no longer adequate, Personal Learning Networks are the future.  This post provides great advice on how to go about creating a PLN.

 

I would point you in the direction of Harold Jarche and his Seek-Sense-Share model and The Connected Workplace: http://connectedworkplace.co.uk/workshops/personal-knowledge-management/

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Your Organization is at Risk

Your Organization is at Risk | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
This is the first of a multi-part series on the trends creating significant impacts on society and creating a digital revolution which may turn out to be the 'new industrial revolution.' Every orga...
David Bramley's insight:

Powerful vision of what is the present, but sounds like the future.  Those who thrive will embrace these trends to support the way they learn and work.  The convergence of work and learning?

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Story Board: The Collaborative Economy for Corporations (Official S...

You may have read the report, the "Collaborative Economy Value Chain" now read the official slideshare storyboard version. This slideshare deck sets up the ch
David Bramley's insight:

A really interesting view on how collaboration will impact on the economy. But any organisation that wants to 'let go' and join this new economy will need employees with the skills to be able to connect with customers and marketplaces.  One way to develop these skills is to facilitate social learning within the organisation.  Enterprise social networks are great places for workers to develop social and collaborative skills in a safe environment.  The by-product will be greater social capital and an increased collective IQ

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The 6 Types Of Assessments (And How They're Changing) - Edudemic

The 6 Types Of Assessments (And How They're Changing) - Edudemic | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
Testing, especially any sort of standardized testing tends to get a bad rap. Teachers complain that they spend too much time teaching to a test.
David Bramley's insight:

This is an interesting infographic that provides an overview of assessment methods and the influence of technology.  I've copied it into this Scoop.it as I see assessment and feedback as key features of teaching and learning. Finding  some way of integrating this into workplace learning would increase its legitimacy for many employers.  As someone involved in the development of vocationally related qualifications, I'd welcome the use of innovative assessment methods that provide authentic learning scenarios for learners.  Any ideas?

 

 

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Learn-by-Doing

Learn-by-Doing | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it

Knowledge management and corporate memory development: Today, companies don't know what they know. They attempt to fix this with knowledge management solutions that are usually just elaborate document retrieval systems. But what people know, the really important stuff, is not likely to be in a document at all. Usually that information comes out in stories told late at night by expert practitioners swapping war stories or sharing interesting experiences that they've had. So how do you get that information to the people who need it?

David Bramley's insight:

Wow!  I've always believed in the power of sorytelling, but this takes it to a whole new level.   ExTRA stands for 'Experts Telling Relevant Advice' and at its basic level it's about capturing stories through video and indexing them so that they can be browsed.  But the use of Artificial Intelligence techniques means that the stories can find the user, rather than the user having to find the story.  They do this by tracking what the user is doing and then presenting them with the most relevant stories. 

 

I work for a Professional Body in the UK and I can see how this could provide a fantastic service for our members.  However, you would need to build up an extensive library of stories and continue to develop current content for the benefits to be realised.  I guess the place to start is by gathering stories using digital media...what do you think?

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John Stepper's Blog

John Stepper's Blog | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it

How working out loud circles could transform your organisation

David Bramley's insight:

For some reason people continue to be reluctant to work out loud and share what they are working on.  As a result innovators like John Stepper and Jane Hart are looking at ways to encourage individuals to take the small steps that are required to change their behaviour.  In this post John introduces 'working out loud circles' as a face to face way of developing the skills and confidence to work out loud.  Why not give it a try?

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Reflecting on the National eXtension Conference (#nexconf)

Reflecting on the National eXtension Conference (#nexconf) | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
In late March I attended one day of the National eXtension Conference (#nexconf) in Sacramento. I went to see Harold Jarche and Jane Hart speak but must say I enjoyed the whole thing. Jane was the ...
David Bramley's insight:

A really interesting reflection of the conference and more specifically the contributions of Jane Hart and Harold Jarche.  It provides an insight into the use of Twitter and social media for learning;  Personal Knowledge Mastery; Seek: Sense: Share and Working Out Loud.  No mean achievement for a 10 minute read :)

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Knowledge Management

Knowledge Management | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
How to manage the ever-increasing flow of information, distill it into best practices and convey those onto others.
David Bramley's insight:

Continuous Profesional Development for the 21st Century.  Information is ubiquitous, to keep up to date you need to develop the habits to seek, make sense of and share the best resources available for your interests.  this post is by the leading expert in personal knowledge management.  Essential reading

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Why Every Employee Should Be Building Weak Ties At Work

Why Every Employee Should Be Building Weak Ties At Work | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
VideoOftentimes we focus on building strong relationships with people, strong ties. After all, the better we know someone and the stronger the relationship is, the more valuable it is for us right? It’s a bit counter-intuitive but in the workplace it is not the strong ties that can be the most [...]
David Bramley's insight:

Strong ties are usually with those who work in your 'silo, focusing on  strong ties entrenches silo working in your organisation.   As work becomes more complex, solutions are often found by drawing on expertise from across the business.  In future, one of the measures of an employees value will be their ability to make connections both internally and externally

 

This post introduces the concept of weak ties and make some suggestions on how they can be developed using technology

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What is your PKM routine? | Harold Jarche

What is your PKM routine? | Harold Jarche | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
David Bramley's insight:

Professional development in the 21st century requires individuals to develop active personal learning networks (PKM) that enable them to find, make sense of and share resources that interest them.  Like all things that add value, developing an active PKM requires hard work and perseverance.  This post provides examples of the routines that a number of experts in the field have adopted to inform their own work..

 

Don't be intimidated by the sophisticated models you see here,  try out a range of tools to discover those you prefer, then make connections and do the same.  I have found that trial and error is the best method, so don't be afraid to change platform or 'unfollow' connections that aren't doing it for you.  I'm finding it difficult to form new routines, but I know I'm a creature of habit so when I reflect on this post I will probably find I have my a PKM routine hat is a work in progress!

 

Essential reading

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The 5 elements of Working Out Loud

The 5 elements of Working Out Loud | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it

“Working Out Loud starts with making your work visible in such a way that it might help others. When you do that – when you work in a more open, connected way – you can build a purposeful network that makes you more effective and provides access to more opportunities.”

David Bramley's insight:

I'm an advocate of Harold Jarche's networked organisation with collaboration and cooperation and John's views on 'working out loud'.  However, I find it difficult to shake off the teacher in me and I find much of my contribution is aimed at educating others on the process rather than actually 'working out loud'!

 

This post has helped me review what it means t work out loud and I'm going to try to act as a role model by narrating my work.  Let's hope I can control the urge to teach :)

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Stop Trying to Formalize Informal Learning! by Stephanie Ivec : Learning Solutions Magazine

Stop Trying to Formalize Informal Learning! by Stephanie  Ivec : Learning Solutions Magazine | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it

Informal learning is “the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs,” according to Jay Cross, an expert on this type of learning

David Bramley's insight:

Informal learning happens subconciously.  But imagine how much more you could gain if you  recognised that it forms up to 70% of your professional development and you introduced behaviours that help you get the most from  the challenges you face at work.  I'm thinking sharing, collaboration, reflection etc..

 

This post is written from the perspective of L&D professionals and the opportunities they can create to leverage informal learning e.g. Enterprise social networks.  But learning is something that happens within the individual and if individuals do not engage with these opportunities L&D professionals will be wasting their time

 

Learning how to learn in this new era of social networking is something every professional needs to engage in

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Most Important Thing in Content Curation: Adding Value - Here 14 Ways To Do It

Most Important Thing in Content Curation: Adding Value - Here 14 Ways To Do It | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
Thinking of adding value should be the first stage in curation, PKM, or any professional online sharing.

Via Robin Good
David Bramley's insight:

My original interest in social learning came through communities of practice.  I spent many hours trying to persuade colleagues to participate in CoP's, with limited success.  On reflection, I feel that the term 'community of practice' was a turn off for many people.  'Networking' is so much easier to connect with

 

I'm having similar issues with 'content curation'!   This post explains in an easily accessible way, what content curation is, why it is important and provides a construct for adding value.  But how many people will read it?  This is an important digital literacy...any ideas for a more populist name?

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John Thomas's curator insight, February 5, 3:27 AM

Most Important Thing in Content Curation: Adding Value - Here 14 Ways To Do It

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 10, 8:53 AM

14 ways to add value when curating content

SyReach's curator insight, July 7, 1:53 AM

SyReach Notes now offers a full coverage of personal KM needs: Seek with integrated watch module and search engines, Sense with note and article edition, linking and knowledge building. Share by email or publish to Scoop.it selected resources linked to your articles!

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Understanding and Creating Professional Learning Networks

A video summary of four articles related to experiences, and strategies for creating professional learning networks in an organization. With a nod to Vi Hart...

Via Paulo Simões
David Bramley's insight:

Changing your behaviour to develop a personal/professional learning network will be essential to thrive in an era of perpetual change.  The old focus on Continuing Professional Development is no longer fit for purpose and this video delivers  advice on creating a network  based on research

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Fishtree Education's comment, November 18, 2013 7:30 AM
Great video. Thanks for sharing!
CedricBorzee's curator insight, January 22, 2:01 PM

The author points 3 criteria for Learning Networks to emerge :

- user ownership

- user independence

- user self-determination 

 

Then 3 "values" - that could also be defined as "Attitudes"
- Trust 

- Openness

- Integrity

 

Last part is on how to "nurture" the right climate for Learning Networks to thrive.

 

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“Working out loud”: Your personal content strategy

“Working out loud”: Your personal content strategy | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it

"The vast majority of people at work are uncomfortable blogging or tweeting. They’re simply not used to it and some may never be.

But everybody works. They create documents and presentations. They schedule and attend events. They comment on other people’s work."

.

David Bramley's insight:

The working day usually starts by opening Outlook and responding to messages that have been received.  Documents we work on will be ved in folders and sent to the 'chosen few.  All in all the majority of work we do is invisible to most people in the organisation!

 

Social networks, like Yammer, provide us with an opportunity to share our work across the organisation and connections to be made. But what do we write?  This post is a great place to start, but are you willing to take the risk?

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Twelve Ways Education Could Change by 2025 (EdSurge News)

Twelve Ways Education Could Change by 2025 (EdSurge News) | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
IMAGINE ALL THE PEOPLE: Zoom zoom! Jump into the DeLorean with KnowledgeWorks and re-imagine the how the education industry will transform in the next 12 years.
David Bramley's insight:

"The future is not a fixed point.  It's ours to create."  This is the inspiring first line of the report by KnowledgeWorks, who describe themselves as 'thought leaders across the learning ecosystem'. To take advantage of the possibilities the future holds, we need to be able to visualise what this might look like.  I recommend this report as a great place to start.  The infographic provides 'A Glimpse into the Future of Learning', with a series of 'visions' of how the learning ecosystem may evolve, with significant implications for workplace learning.  For example:

 

"Work will evolve so rapidly that continuous career readiness will become the norm."

and

"Diverse forms of credentials, certificates, and reputation markers will 

reflect the many ways in which people learn and demonstrate mastery."

 

Are we ready to provide new ways for people to learn?

 

 

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Why Mobile Learning Is Inevitable - Edudemic

Why Mobile Learning Is Inevitable - Edudemic | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
Mobile learning is here to stay. In fact, it's going to be one of the only options for learning pretty soon. This new presentation tells you why.
David Bramley's insight:

The statistics in the presentation show what we all guessed...technology is moving in step changes and the way we use it is failing to keep up!  I've thought for some time that mass take-up of elearning would skip the PC and laptop and go straight to mobile.  This is based on the lack of innovation I had been seeing from commercial providers (pre- EdTech bubble) and the reluctance of educators (and to a certain extent learners) to engage with the medium.

 

However, new approaches to workplace learning such as 70:20:10, 'push and pull' and personal learning networks and the explosion of new tools being produced by the EdTech revolution are finally delivering a step change in learning...and it's being delivered on mobile devices!  Those who recognise this will give themselves a competitive advantage

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Learning and the Changing Workplace - Part 1

Learning and the Changing Workplace - Part 1 | Dave B's Collaboration in Organisations | Scoop.it
I've been thinking a lot about the future of workplace Learning and Development* (L&D) or, more specifically, about the evolution of the workplace and the changing role of L&D in it. I'm no...
David Bramley's insight:

It's interesting to read someone else's 'take' on the future of workplace learning and to a certain extent it reminded me of another post I read recently titled 'Microsoft Office is dead!'.  The thrust of the post was that technology is moving so quickly that desktops and laptops have been overtaken by mobile and tablet and that there are many apps that can be used as productivity tools.  In the comments, a number of people suggested that the author needed to get out into the real world, as technolgy use in the workplace is changing at a far slower rate than it is for personal use.  

 

I have found a similar issue in relation to enterprise social networks, a potential cornerstone for the change in workplace learning.  Individuals appear happy to share their recommendations on hotels, electrical goods, music and all manner of other things in their personal life, but are reluctant to share the things that they are working on!  At some point this will change, but I'm not sure what the tipping point will be...any ideas?  

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