DataPhilanthropy
244 views | +0 today
Follow
DataPhilanthropy
Leveraging the combined power of shared private sector (big) data and analytic capabilities of researchers in universities and business schools to produce open knowledge for innovation and prosperity
Curated by wmijnhardt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Global Pulse: Data Philantrophy; where are we now?

Global Pulse: Data Philantrophy; where are we now? | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

The conversation around Data Philanthropy - a term which describes a new form of partnership in which private sector companies share data for public benefit - has advanced on four distinct but related levels since its emergence at the World Economic Forum in Davos in 2011:

 

1: Conceptual development: discourse and debate

 

Discussions about the concept of Data Philanthropy, or private sector data sharing, have gained momentum and moved forward, reaching a broader audience. Conversations and debates around Data Philanthropy are happening in different sectors, but much more can be gained through exchange between the different stakeholder communities working on solutions and testing new approaches.

 

2: Research: a growing body of evidence

 

Researchers have been able to demonstrate the vast potential of data sets normally hidden behind corporate firewalls as a source for new insights into human behavior, creating notable case studies to support the arguments in favor of Data Philanthropy.

 

3: Private sector data sharing

 

A handful of pioneers have been testing the waters of private sector data sharing. French telecommunications company France Telecom-Orange, for example, has made anonymized records of five million mobile phone users in Cote d'Ivoire available to the research community as part of the Data for Development Challenge.

 

4: Searching for frameworks

 

A quest for suitable legal frameworks, ethical guidelines and technology solutions for privacy-preserving data sharing is taking place within various communities all over the world. Crisis mappers and disaster response experts are debating the idea of a “Big Data Philanthropy group for humanitarian response” while data privacy experts are working on sophisticated mathematical techniques like differential privacy and "space time boxes" to make personal data accessible while preserving high levels of individual privacy. Here at Global Pulse, our Legal Advisor has been consulting with data privacy experts from around the world to get inputs on the data privacy guidelines we will follow in our Pulse Labs.

 

Obstacles on the road ahead:

Despite the growing acknowledgement of the benefits, we are far from having a viable and sustainable model for private sector data sharing. This is due to a number of challenges - most of which revolve around personal data privacy, and corporate market competitiveness. Companies have to protect the individual privacy of their customers as well as their own competitiveness. The possibility of re-identification in the age of big data is a real and growing concern. Solutions, guidelines and best practices are needed for how data can be stripped of any personally identifiable information, and only the aggregate level trends are shared. 

The list of challenges is certainly much longer than those listed above, and all of them could pose obstacles on the road to private sector data sharing, hence it’s more then ever necessary keep the debate, research and framework development going in order to find appropriate solutions to the issues data-sharing presents.



Source:

Global Pulse

Andreas Pawelke and Anoush Rima Tatevossian May 8, 2013   



 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Technology for Good Report; Innovative use of technology by charities and nonprofits

Technology for Good Report; Innovative use of technology by charities and nonprofits | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

Technology for Goodidentifies ten technologies being used in innovative ways to create positive social change.

Examples are drawn from charitable organizations working on widely varied issues around the globe. This makes Technology for Good a unique repository of inspiration for the public and private sectors, funders, and other change makers who support using technology for social good.

 

In determining the top ten trends, we chose technology that has the potential for wide reach, deep impact, and ease of use.

For nonprofits and other charitable organizations, the report offers many examples of how technology can help organizations achieve their missions, even with modest means.
For funders, the report compiles a variety of successful projects, demonstrating the deep impact of funding technology innovation.
Finally, for everyone interested in creating positive social change, the projects described in Technology for Good offer a number of interesting lessons.

 

The report was created by TechSoup Global in collaboration with the Guardian.

Fulltext is here: http://www.techsoup.org/SiteCollectionDocuments/technology-for-good-report.pdf

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

DataKind | Let's use data to change the world.

DataKind | Let's use data to change the world. | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it
The Puzzle: NGOs and other mission-driven organizations are faced with an onslaught of decisions on how to best collect, analyze and visualize the data that will help them make the world a better place.

 

We are living inside a data revolution that is transforming the way we understand and interact with each other and the world, and it has only just begun. Data has the potential to make hidden relationships crystal clear, to be a common language between people who might never have spoken, to inspire collaboration, to off er metrics for decision making, and to turn seemingly unrelated ideas into powerful insights that can solve the most complex and intractable problems we face.

 

DataKind brings together leading data scientists with high impact social organizations through a comprehensive, collaborative approach that leads to shared insights, greater understanding, and positive action through data in the service of humanity.

We believe that improving the quality of, access to, and understanding of data in the social sector will lead to better decision-making and greater social impact. 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

The Changing Landscape of Global Philanthropy; the 2013 Global Philanthropy Index shows that the BRIC countries are taking over

The Changing Landscape of Global Philanthropy; the 2013 Global Philanthropy Index shows that the BRIC countries are taking over | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

Ottawa, Canada, September 26, 2013 – New research funded by Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC) shows that emerging economies are dramatically increasing their financial flows to the developing world. And as previously happened in developed countries, most of those flows are from private rather than public sources, notably through remittances. The analysis, conducted by the Hudson Institute's Center for Global Prosperity in Washington, DC, is published in the 2013 Index of Global Philanthropy and Remittances: With a Special Report on Emerging Economies. The Index is being launched on Thursday, September 26 at the Economic Club of Canada. Dr Carol Adelman, Director of Hudson's Center for Global Prosperity and co-author of the new report, will discuss its findings and implications for global assistance to the developing world. For the first time, the 2013 Index looks at the total economic engagement of developed countries and emerging economies with the developing world. This unique approach looks not just at government aid, but private financial flows including global philanthropy, private capital investment, and private remittances sent by migrants back home. Of all financial flows, private flows from developed to developing countries are greater than 80%; government aid is less than 20%, the opposite of 40 years ago. In the four emerging economies studied – Brazil, China, India, and South Africa – more than 95% of financial flows to developing countries are private and fewer than 5% are government aid. The dominance of private flows over government aid reflects a dramatic change in developing countries. The 2013 Index shows that emerging economies play a significant role in private flows to developing countries. The four emerging economies studied provide 15% of the US$680 billion in private flows from both developed and emerging economies in the form of private capital investment ($88 billion), remittances ($14.2 billion), and philanthropy ($366 million).  “Private philanthropy was the most difficult to measure,” says Adelman, “and is very likely underestimated.” The research uncovered a growing philanthropic infrastructure in each of the four countries with the beginnings of creative overseas philanthropic projects. Adelman is optimistic about philanthropy in emerging economies. "Our research shows encouraging signs that emerging economies will increase giving beyond their own borders,” she reports. The Hudson Institute partnered with five in-country nonprofit organizations to collect the data: Charity SA in South Africa; China Foundation Center in China; Comunitas and Grupo de Institutos Fundacoes e Empresas in Brazil; and the Sampradaan Indian Centre for Philanthropy. IDRC President Jean Lebel will open the lecture. The report can be downloaded online atwww.global-prosperity.org/

Fulltext is here: http://www.hudson.org/files/documents/2013IndexofGlobalPhilanthropyandRemittances.pdf


Original published here: http://www.idrc.ca/EN/Media/Pages/news-release-adelman.aspx

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

The value of Big Data: How analytics differentiates winners

The value of Big Data: How analytics differentiates winners | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

Big Data is quickly becoming a critically important driver of business success across sectors, but many executives say they don’t think their companies are equipped to make the most of it. Bain & Company surveyed executives at more than 400 companies around the world, most with revenues of more than $1 billion. We asked them about their data and analytics capabilities and about their decision-making speed and effectiveness.

The results were surprising: We found that only 4% of companies are really good at analytics, an elite group that puts into play the right people, tools, data and intentional focus. These are the companies that are already using analytics insights to change the way they operate or to improve their products and services. And the difference is already visible.

 

Source: The value of Big Data: How analytics differentiates winnersSeptember 17, 2013, BAIN insights

By Rasmus Wegener and Velu Sinha

 

Report: http://www.bain.com/Images/BAIN%20_BRIEF_The_value_of_Big_Data.pdf

 

more...
Rescooped by wmijnhardt from GIS, Spatial modelling & Plants
Scoop.it!

Mapping Philanthropy: How You Can Use Data Visualization to Do Good

Mapping Philanthropy: How You Can Use Data Visualization to Do Good | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it
Philanthropy in US is making growing use of the latest data visualization tools to analyze and share information. To hear about tools that your organization could utilize, watch this webinar on Mapping Philanthropy: How You Can Use Data Visualization to Do Good.
Via Knapco
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by wmijnhardt from Educational Technology in Higher Education
Scoop.it!

BBC plans to help get UK coding

BBC plans to help get UK coding | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it
“ The BBC will launch an initiative in 2015 to get coding more widespread in schools and homes.”
Via KiwiBelma, Mark Smithers
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Defining Open Data | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog

Defining Open Data | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

Open data is data that can be freely used, shared and built-on by anyone, anywhere, for any purpose. This is the summary of the full Open Definition which the Open Knowledge Foundation created in 2005 to provide both a succinct explanation and a detailed definition of open data. As the open data movement grows, and even more governments and organisations sign up to open data, it becomes ever more important that there is a clear and agreed definition for what “open data” means if we are to realise the full benefits of openness, and avoid the risks of creating incompatibility between projects and splintering the community. Open can apply to information from any source and about any topic. Anyone can release their data under an open licence for free use by and benefit to the public. Although we may think mostly about government and public sector bodies releasing public information such as budgets or maps, or researchers sharing their results data and publications, any organisation can open information (corporations, universities, NGOs, startups, charities, community groups and individuals). -


See more at: http://blog.okfn.org/2013/10/03/defining-open-data/#sthash.dagOKIiL.dpuf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

The Big Data Conundrum: How to Define It? - MIT Technology Review

The Big Data Conundrum: How to Define It? - MIT Technology Review | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it
The Big Data Conundrum: How to Define It?
MIT Technology Review
One of the biggest new ideas in computing is “big data”. There is unanimous agreement that big data is revolutionising commerce in the 21st century.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Pioneering a new age of philanthropy; DataGiving

Pioneering a new age of philanthropy; DataGiving | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

Sobia Hamid, founder of DataGiving is a leading part of the Cambridge startup scene and is innovating in philanthropy using data. Find out more about DataGiving...this article is an interview is with Sobia Hamid, founder of DataGiving. Based in Cambridge, DataGiving is a new way to encourage charitable giving by revealing the real world impact of every donation. DataGiving’s core mission is to activate ethical giving and pioneer a new age of philanthropy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

PHILANTHROPY 2173 the future of good: Data Philanthropy

PHILANTHROPY 2173 the future of good: Data Philanthropy | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

Data need to be seen as both an input and output of philanthropic dollars and institutions. The dollars are limited. The information they create and can catalyze can be re-used and re-applied over and over (if let loose into the world with that intention).

If foundations really valued data as an input, they'd rethink their grants management departments. These data experts wouldn't just deal with compliance issues, they'd be unleashed on relevant external data sets that matter to the foundation's program strategies. They'd be let loose to map, crunch, remix public data sets, peer data sets, industry data sets that would be used by program officers to develop their funding strategies. Grants management isn't just compliance, its strategy and learning. They'd partner with program and evaluation staff to make teams with data, domain, and grantmaking expertise, as well as appropriate external networks to assess and validate internal ideas. They'd be part of building the learning cycles and toolsthat would keep the grants meaningful and the foundation catalytic, not just compliant. They'd lead the charge in re-inventing evaluation at foundations, a process that data, shared data systems and data software will accelerate. 

Source: Philanthropy 2173

LUCY BERNHOLZ 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by wmijnhardt from Groking Data
Scoop.it!

Unlocking Data for Philanthropy: Notes from Global Philanthropy Forum Session

Unlocking Data for Philanthropy:  Notes from Global Philanthropy Forum Session | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it
I was honored to be invited to cover this year's Global Philanthropy Forum, a community of donors and social investors committed to international causes.  The annual conference helps inform, enable and enhance the strategic nature of their work.

Via Snow Dowd
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Open Data500; U.S. companies that use open government data to generate new business and develop new products and services.

Open Data500; U.S. companies that use open government data to generate new business and develop new products and services. | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

The Open Data 500 is the first comprehensive study of U.S. companies that use open government data to generate new business and develop new products and services. The Open Data 500 study is funded by the Knight Foundation and conducted by the GovLab. Open data is free, public data that anyone can use to launch commercial and nonprofit ventures, do research, make data-driven decisions, and solve complex problems.

Candidate list: http://www.opendata500.com/candidates/



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Open Data Institute; Knowledge for everyone

Open Data Institute; Knowledge for everyone | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

The Open Data Institute is catalysing the evolution of open data culture to create economic, environmental, and social value. It helps unlock supply, generates demand, creates and disseminates knowledge to address local and global issues.

 

ODI convenes world-class experts to collaborate, incubate, nurture and mentor new ideas, and promote innovation. We enable anyone to learn and engage with open data, and empower our teams to help others through professional coaching and mentoring.

 

Founded by Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Professor Nigel Shadbolt, the ODI is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan, limited by guarantee company.

more...
Suzanne Scott's curator insight, March 21, 2014 5:22 PM

Thanks to wmijnhardt for original topic curation on Data Philanthropy

Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Pivotal for Good and DataKind Connects Data Scientists and Social Organizations | Pivotal P.O.V.

Pivotal for Good and DataKind Connects Data Scientists and Social Organizations | Pivotal P.O.V. | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

The power and value of sophisticated data analysis is demonstrable in many contexts. From Wall Street to the White House, social media to healthcare, the greatest challenge for data-deluged organizations is not collection or storage, but finding skilled data scientists in this still-emerging field. This challenge is particularly acute for non-profits and social service organizations that are awash in data yet lack the resources to effectively leverage and act upon that information. Pivotal for Good, a partnership between Pivotal and non-profit DataKind, aims to bridge that gap by connecting Pivotal’s top-flight data scientists with social organizations and communities in need of their skills. - See more at: http://blog.gopivotal.com/news-2/solving-for-people-pivotal-for-good-and-datakind-connects-data-scientists-and-social-organizations#sthash.ma31tpW2.dpuf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Data Currency, Data Science for Charities, Data Tools, Data as Code and Data Privacy #DataDigest | NetSquared

Data Currency, Data Science for Charities, Data Tools, Data as Code and Data Privacy #DataDigest | NetSquared | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

This week read about how data science is helping charities, a new data visualization tool, donor data privacy, the similairities between data and code as well as how data has become the new currency.

Nonprofits and Data

How data science is helping charities save lives and their budgets

In this Gigaom post by Derrick Harris the need to go beyond voluntary data efforts to meaningful, integrated and sustained data efforts in nonprofit operations is discussed. He explains why investment in people and technology is important to realise this and offers Rayid Ghani’s new startup Edgeflip as a good example of this. He says that nonprofits should utilise more data science and which would also be welcomed by donors.  Sharing data among nonprofits that work on solving the same issues is also identified as one way of closing the data gap. He likens such a “data fabric” to Facebook  and suggests that large foundations can help to support this.

 

Data Visualization Tools

New tool lets you visualize just about anything in 5 minutes (maybe less)

A new web tool called Raw has been developed that helps the public create advanced data visualizations in just a few minutes. Data from a table is pasted in, the preferred type of visualisation is chosen and then chosen variables are analyze by dragging them into predefined mapping categories. The visualisation can be downloaded as a vector, PNG or JSON files.

 

Data Formats

Treat Data As Code

In this Directions Magazine article, Ben Balter suggests that today open data is at the same position open source was two decades ago and explains how he thinks the open data community could develop even more quickly. For instance, he suggests that every time a government agency posts a dataset, rather than posting the data as a zip file or to a proprietary data portal, the data should be treated as open source and in the same respectful way that geeks treat their code.

 

Data Models

Data as the new currency

In this post by Deloitte University Press the role that government can playing in establishing data as a currency is explored. These include: data economy producer, consumer, and facilitator. The marketplace for data as a currency is also examined through 4 key roles which are: open data providers, data aggregators, data for service and data protectors. Many examples of new businesses and organisational initiatives premised on data as a new currency are provided.

 

Data and Privacy

Pitting Data Against Donor Privacy 

This Nonprofit Times post talks about how NSA revelations has highlighted the need for nonprofits to have better rules around the collection, use, security and disclosure of personal information. Limiting the data obtained to what is needed, restricting the uses and disclosures of the data and keeping that data secure and confidentiality are suggested as ways to achieve this. In addition, transparency around data use is seen as key for helping nonprofits retain trust.

 

Originally posteed here:

by keishataylo 

http://www.netsquared.org/blog/data-currency-data-science-charities-data-tools-data-code-and-data-privacy-datadigest?utm_content=bufferc6a31&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Buffer#.Ul43mBCnJMZ

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by wmijnhardt from Visualization
Scoop.it!

Nonprofit Data Visualization: a Gallery - Mission: Innovation - The Chronicle of Philanthropy- Connecting the nonprofit world with news, jobs, and ideas

Nonprofit Data Visualization: a Gallery - Mission: Innovation - The Chronicle of Philanthropy- Connecting the nonprofit world with news, jobs, and ideas | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

Via Stewart Townsend
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Hedge-Fund Billionaire Uses Data Analysis to Guide Giving - Chronicle of Philanthropy (subscription) (blog)

Hedge-Fund Billionaire Uses Data Analysis to Guide Giving - Chronicle of Philanthropy (subscription) (blog) | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it
“ Hedge-Fund Billionaire Uses Data Analysis to Guide Giving Chronicle of Philanthropy (subscription) (blog) He and his wife ranked third on The Chronicle of Philanthropy's list of top donors in 2012, giving away $423-million, most of it through their...”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Big Data’s Five Routes to Value; The companies that get ahead will be the ones that see and seize the full range of opportunities that big data offers.

Big Data’s Five Routes to Value; The companies that get ahead will be the ones that see and seize the full range of opportunities that big data offers. | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

In today’s world, nothing is certain but death, taxes, and the growth of data. The quantity of information generated from the dawn of time until 2003—some 5 exabytes, according to Intel—is now created every two days. Businesses have long understood that there is value—somewhere—to be extracted from this burgeoning volume of data. And increasingly, they have been able to get at it more efficiently and cost effectively. Yet for all their enthusiasm for “big data,” most companies are only scratching the surface of the opportunities that await them. They are analyzing data for insight—an important, value-generating strategy, to be sure—but have yet to exploit the truly transformative role that big data can play in how and where they do business.

The companies that get ahead will be the ones that see and seize the full range of opportunities that big data offers. We envision five major applications: generating new business insights; improving core operating processes; enabling faster, better decision making; taking advantage of changing value chains; and creating new data-centric businesses. Not all of these opportunities will be relevant to every business, but most companies can benefit on multiple fronts. For those that do, the prize won’t be just a competitive advantage but, potentially, the ability to reshape the competitive landscape.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

openPDS - The privacy-preserving Personal Data Store

openPDS - The privacy-preserving Personal Data Store | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

OpenPDS allows users to collect, store, and give fine-grained access to their data all while protecting their privacy.

With the rise of smartphones and their built-in sensors as well as web-apps, an increasing amount of personal data is being silently collected. Personal data–digital information about users’ location, calls, web-searches, and preferences–is undoubtedly the oil of the new economy. However, the lack of access to the data makes it very hard if not impossible for an individual to understand and manage the risks associated with the collected data. Therefore, advancements in using and mining this data have to evolve in parallel with considerations about ownership and privacy.

Many of the initial and critical steps towards individuals data ownership are technological. Given the huge number of data sources that a user interacts with on a daily basis, interoperability is not enough. Rather, the user needs to actually own a secured space, a Personal Data Store (PDS) acting as a centralized location where his data live. Owning a PDS would allow the user to view and reason about the data collected. The user can then truly control the flow of data and manage fine-grained authorizations for accessing his data.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Big Data Is Too Big for Scientists to Handle Alone - Wired Science

Big Data Is Too Big for Scientists to Handle Alone - Wired Science | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it
“Big data is not magic.” It doesn’t matter how much data you have if you can’t make sense of it. http://t.co/kEwpGwGDHa
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Ten Simple Rules for Cultivating Open Science and Collaborative R&D

Ten Simple Rules for Cultivating Open Science and Collaborative R&D | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

If you want to apply open science and collaborative R&D, what principles are useful? We suggest Ten Simple Rules for Cultivating Open Science and Collaborative R&D.

 

Rule 1: Get the Incentives Right—Learn from the Past

Rule 2: Make Your Controlled Collaborations Win-Win-Win

Rule 3: Understand What Works—and What Doesn't

Rule 4: Lead as a Coach, Not a CEO

Rule 5: Diversify Your Contributors

Rule 6: Diversify Your Customers

Rule 7: Don't Reinvent the Wheel

Rule 8: Think Big

Rule 9: Encourage Supportive Policies and Tools

Rule 10: Grow the Commons

 

 

Source:

Citation: Masum H, Rao A, Good BM, Todd MH, Edwards AM, et al. (2013) Ten Simple Rules for Cultivating Open Science and Collaborative R&D. PLoS Comput Biol 9(9): e1003244. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003244

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

Teradata Announces New Focus on Data Philanthropy; exploiting core competencies in data analytics to use the power of data for public good

Teradata Announces New Focus on Data Philanthropy; exploiting core competencies in data analytics to use the power of data for public good | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

Teradata (NYSE: TDC) is bringing the data revolution to strong and significant social charities around the world through an exciting new data philanthropy initiative. By using its core competencies in data analytics, Teradata plans to help these non-profit organizations tackle the thorny data problems they face, and use the analytics to better serve the needs of their clientele.

"Our commitment to our customers – to drive value from data – is reflected in our strategic giving focus on data philanthropy – to use the power of data for public good. We are proud of this new direction, and excited about the opportunities to do more with data to strengthen our communities and the world at large," said Teradata President and CEO Mike Koehler.

Teradata has begun this data philanthropy focus in partnership with DataKind, a non-profit that matches talented data scientists with non-profit and non-governmental organizations that have huge troves of data but lack the resources to analyze them. By working together, Teradata and these high-impact social organizations can use the data analysis to make people’s lives easier and more rewarding.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by wmijnhardt
Scoop.it!

BIG DATA FOR HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE AND DISASTER RESPONSE

Abstract: We now live in a world in which vast amounts of data are created and stored on a  constant and ongoing basis. The effects of globalization along with the advent of internet and  mobile communications has created an opportunity for more effective analysis and response  to crises through the use of big data analysis and network science theory. The world  economies once separated by geography, culture, and language have become increasingly
interconnected as the ability to transport products and communicate ideas has become easier.  As the communication and physical divides continue to shrink, the need to address  problems in the world more effectively and efficiently increases. The onset, pace, and scope  of global disasters is growing faster than our collective ability to respond to such shocks. A
byproduct of our world becoming interconnected is that disasters which directly affect a  specific region also may have a global effect which transcends national borders. What started  as a natural disaster in a given geographic area can evolve into an economic shock that hits
regions not directly affected by the initial disaster. These secondary shocks invariably damage the regions least able to effectively manage them.
The analysis of large data sets of complex systems, or big data analysis, allows for the  study of trends and prediction of outcomes for future action. Applying network science  theory to a large data set adds depth to this analysis by examining clusters of related entities  and the value of their linkages. This dual approach allows for the identification of macrolevel trends through big data analysis and integral structural linkages within the data set via  network science analysis. Using this technique, development and humanitarian aid can then  be distributed in a more effective manner, getting aid to the areas that can benefit from it the  most.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by wmijnhardt from GIS, Spatial modelling & Plants
Scoop.it!

Mapping Philanthropy: How You Can Use Data Visualization to Do Good

Mapping Philanthropy: How You Can Use Data Visualization to Do Good | DataPhilanthropy | Scoop.it

Philanthropy in US is making growing use of the latest data visualization tools to analyze and share information. To hear about tools that your organization could utilize, watch this webinar on Mapping Philanthropy: How You Can Use Data Visualization to Do Good.


Via Knapco
more...
No comment yet.