dataInnovation
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dataInnovation
Proficient in Information System Design used to the development of Business Intelligence Platforms and Semantic Web Ontologies. With experience in the benefits of the knowledge extraction by integrating LinkedData Technologies and OpenData Sources.
Curated by Fàtima Galan
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How Applications of Big Data Drive Industries

How Applications of Big Data Drive Industries | dataInnovation | Scoop.it
How industries like banking, healthcare, education, manufacturing, Insurance, retail, etc. are using big data.

Via Luca Naso
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PhysicsTutorRanchi's curator insight, December 19, 2015 8:27 AM

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Fabio Di Pasquale's curator insight, April 5, 2:30 AM

There is a substantial spending on big data, with more than 75% of companies (from different industries) investing in big data in the next two years.

 

Each industry vertical has its own challenges and solutions. Here is a great article and infographics by simplilearn that describe for 10 verticals both main challenges and applications.

The 10 industries are:

1. Banking

2. Communication

3. Healthcare

4. Education

5. Manufacturing

6. Government

7. Insurance

8. Retail

9. Transportation

10. Energy

Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, April 22, 3:29 AM

A Gartner Survey for 2015 shows that more than 75% of companies are investing or are planning to invest in big data in the next two years. These findings represent a significant increase compare to 2012.

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Infographic: The World’s Largest Languages

Infographic: The World’s Largest Languages | dataInnovation | Scoop.it

Graphics director Alberto Lucas Lopéz has created the following infographic for South China Morning Post, depicting languages as populations. 

Based on data from language research project Ethnologue, the infographic shows 23 out of more than 7,000 languages in the world as there are at least 50 million individuals who use these 23 languages as their first language.


Via Lauren Moss
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The Four V's of Big Data

The Four V's of Big Data | dataInnovation | Scoop.it
Imagine all the information you alone generate each time you swipe your credit card, post to social media, drive your car, leave a voicemail, or visit a doctor.

Via Luca Naso
Fàtima Galan's insight:

The Veracity although is one of the las Vs of Big Data is very important because if you combine your data with expired or lapsed data your result will be worthless. The veracity is important for two reasons: to be sure the authenticity of the source and if the data has been updated.

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Luca Naso's curator insight, July 29, 2013 9:50 AM

In addition to the traditional 3 Vs of Big Data

-Volume

-Velocity

-Variety

IBM scientists have added a 4th one:

-Veracity.

 

I couldn't agree more.

Hidden in Big Data you can find almost any kind of correlation you want, but not all of them are significant, that's why still "one in three business leaders do not trust the information they use to make decisions."

Luca Naso's comment, July 30, 2013 11:29 AM
Analytics are only as good as the data they are built upon
Jordi Carrió Jamilà's curator insight, August 2, 2013 5:44 AM

Para ayudar a hablar de "grandes datos", los científicos de IBM Data descomponen en cuatro dimensiones: volumen, velocidad, variedad y veracidad. Aquí hay alguna información acerca de cada una para que pueda entender mejor los fundamentos.

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15 Stunning Big Data Visualizations (And What You Can Learn From Them)

15 Stunning Big Data Visualizations (And What You Can Learn From Them) | dataInnovation | Scoop.it
15 examples of data visualizations that will give you a clearer understanding of what makes a good visualization--and what makes a bad one.

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Luca Naso's curator insight, November 17, 2015 9:26 AM

A list of awesome visualisations!

Not only are they clear and beautiful, but also they keep you focused on the subject and succeed in conveying the story behind the data.

 

If you need to stimulate your creativity for your next dashboard or infographics have a close look at them!

 

Here is my list of top 5:

1. Are we alone?

Stimulate user’s imagination

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120821-how-many-alien-worlds-exist


2. Here is today

Give perspective

http://hereistoday.com/

 
3. You fix the budget
Empower the users

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/13/weekinreview/deficits-graphic.html

4. The Internet map

Exploit metaphors

http://internet-map.net/


5. Infographics with Real images

http://marion-luttenberger.squarespace.com/#/infographics/

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A Visual History of Computing [Infographic]

A Visual History of Computing [Infographic] | dataInnovation | Scoop.it

Exactly 70 years ago this month the world’s first electronic programmable digital computer was created. It was called Colossus and was engineered in the UK by code breakers working during the Second World War. 

Computers and their uses have changed significantly over the past 70 years – primarily government machines quickly proved their worth in the business landscape, and more recently they have become commonplace in homes too.

Akita, a London IT support company has produced a large interactive page and infographic to showcase the developments in technology. It can be viewed in full here: http://www.akita.co.uk/computing-history/ or as a static image at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities | dataInnovation | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)


Via Lauren Moss, luiy
Fàtima Galan's insight:

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.