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Healthcare's Big Problem With Little Data

Healthcare's Big Problem With Little Data | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Every year, the analyst firm Gartner publishes between 90 and 100 "Hype Cycles" with insight on about 1,900 different technologies.
Stephen Dale's insight:

According to Gartner, Big Data has about 2-5 years before reaching it’s ”Plateau of Productivity.” That’s the enviable point at which a technology finally delivers predictable value. The promise of Big Data, of course, is a treasure trove of high value across many industries  – including healthcare. Everything from predictive and prescriptive analytics to population health, disease management, drug discovery and personalized medicine (delivered with much greater precision and higher efficacy) to name but a few.

 

Big Data is clearly where all the excitement and headlines are, but it’s the little data that is likely to have the most effect on our individual healthcare. That is at least until Big Data gets well beyond its “peak of inflated expectations” and closer to its “plateau of productivity.” The question then is – which vendors are likely to be around in 2-to-5 years?

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Data & Informatics
The application and usage of data along with the interaction between people, organisations and technology
Curated by Stephen Dale
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Social Media Strategy: Why Insight and Evidence is So Important

Social Media Strategy: Why Insight and Evidence is So Important | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

Via janlgordon
Stephen Dale's insight:

A timely call for a dispassionate, unbiassed and "agnostic" analysis of data to discover what it is really telling us, and then acting on this information. Sounds obvious? Then why are we so often misled through our ignorance of good and accurate data analysis? 

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Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 7:36 AM
Thanks for sharing:)
Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 7:36 AM
Thanks for sharing:)+
Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 7:37 AM
Thanks for sharing:)
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Turn Google Docs Into an RSS Reader with ImportFeed

Turn Google Docs Into an RSS Reader with ImportFeed | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
This tutorial shows how to use a Google Docs spreadsheet as an RSS Feed reader (see example). You can aggregate news feeds from different sources into one spreadsheet (similar to alltop, popurls or addictomatic) and then publish it as a web page.

If you have a blog, you can use the same trick to embed RSS feeds in web pages. The Google Docs approach is preferred over Flash or Javascript widgets because here you have complete control over the presentation layout and formatting of content.

Via Howard Rheingold
Stephen Dale's insight:

How to roll your own RSS reader!

 

Reading time: 10mins

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, December 10, 2:58 PM

Another slightly geeky but potentially useful approach to rolling your own RSS feed aggregator (like the previous entry, this one came as a tip from one of my Stanford students, Fang Li).

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12 data maps that sum up London

12 data maps that sum up London | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Stephen Dale's insight:
Geographer Dr James Cheshire and visual designer Oliver Uberti say their book - London: The Information Capital - is not an atlas, but instead a series of data portraits. Some great examples of how data can be brought to life through some imaginative graphics. Reading time: 6 mins
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23 Seldom-Used Ideas for Utilizing Twitter Lists

23 Seldom-Used Ideas for Utilizing Twitter Lists | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
If you’ve read any lists on Twitter tips, whether for beginners or for experts, you’ve likely come across the common advice to use Twitter lists.

Twitter lists are useful, helpful, and effective for managing and optimizing your Twitter experience. There’s also a number of unique ways to go about them.

I researched the topic and found 23 popular and outside-the-box ideas for what to do with your Twitter list. See what I learned in the post below, and add your favorite uses in the comments.

Via Howard Rheingold
Stephen Dale's insight:

Twitter Lists are a great way of tracking people and conversations by theme or meme. Easy to set up, and easy to maintain. I've found them to be a very useful tool for the Curator's toolbox.

 

Reading time: 8 mins

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, October 27, 2:15 PM

When I teach infotention, I show learners how they can curate Twitter lists and use Paper.li to turn the lists into daily briefings by networks of experts on topics of their choosing. Curating, focusing, distilling, and formatting incoming streams of information about precisely the topics that interest you at any time is a key infotention skill. h/t Tracy Vu

NLafferty's curator insight, October 28, 5:16 AM

It's worth having a look at Howard Rheingold's comment on this post where he mentions that he suggests to his students creating Twitter lists and then using Paper.li to create a briefing around the topic or network.  It's not something I've done but sounds like an effective way to curate #FOAMed resources insights to students and trainees. 

Alex Grech's curator insight, October 28, 12:51 PM

For most people who use Twitter for lifelong learning purposes, the 'Eureka' moment tends to be the day they understand how to put lists to good strategic use.

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The Dawn of the Zettabyte Era [INFOGRAPHIC]

The Dawn of the Zettabyte Era [INFOGRAPHIC] | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
It’s common knowledge that the amount of online rich media consumption is increasing exponentially on an annual basis. But how much video traffic is projected o
Stephen Dale's insight:

Though this article is slightly aged, it's still as relevant today as when it was first published in 2011. The use of graphics also gives a useful perspective on how the volume of data is growing and where some of this growth is coming from. No wonder we feel overwhelmed!

 

Reading time: 5 mins

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22 maps and charts that will surprise you

22 maps and charts that will surprise you | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
These 22 charts and maps all told me something I found surprising. Some of them genuinely changed the way I think about the world.
Stephen Dale's insight:

A great example of how data visualisation (in this case, maps) can reveal perspectives that might otherwise go unnoticed.

 

Reading time: 15 mins

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Heralding the Internet of Things: How Will it Impact Business Owners?

Heralding the Internet of Things: How Will it Impact Business Owners? | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
While it is not universally accepted wisdom, there is a growing sense that artificial intelligence will supersede human intelligence at some point during the next 100 years. This will ultimately see …
Stephen Dale's insight:

According to a report by BI intelligence, the number of devices using the Internet of Things is estimated at a just under 2 billion. By 2018, this figure is expected to rise to 9 billion, as the technology continues to be refined and sophisticated to include new applications.


Analysts and marketing types (of course) are heralding a utopian vision where everything will be connected, and perfect, bug-free applications will manage our privacy and security and put us in ultimate control of - well - everything critical to our existence. Not even our fridge will know where we are!  What could possibly go wrong?!


Reading time 5 mins

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Who Owns Your Data?

Who Owns Your Data? | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Alistair Croll is the co-chair of O’Reilly’s Strata conference, which tackles the convergence of Big Data, ubiquitous computing, and new interfaces. The next Strata event happen...
Stephen Dale's insight:

Particularly relevant abstract from the article:


"The important question isn’t who owns the data. Ultimately, we all do. A better question is, who owns the means of analysis? Because that’s how, as Brand suggests, you get the right information in the right place. The digital divide isn’t about who owns data — it’s about who can put that data to work."


Reading time: 10mins

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Designing a Personal Knowledgebase

"Since so much knowledge is now digital, there is no shortage of material from which I can learn. On the contrary, I’m usually drowning in too much information. But that’s a discussion for another day. For me, right now, the major problem is that I lack an easy and effective system for capturing and recording my learning. My memory alone will not suffice. What I need is a personal knowledgebase, which I define as an external, integrated digital repository for the things I learn and the resources from which they come.


Many have tried to solve the problem I’m encountering now, and numerous digital solutions exist. Some of the most popular options include Evernote, Devonthink, and Voodoo Pad. Over the course of my graduate studies, I’ve tried many of these programs, but all have fallen short of what I really need, given my own workflow."


Via Howard Rheingold
Stephen Dale's insight:

We live in an age where information is all around us, all of the time. Sometimes we seek it out, other times it comes to us, uninvited. The only way we can learn from and apply this information (actionable knowledge) is by having the tools and know-how to be able to sort, sense, filter, organise and ultimately retrieve this information within a context where it can be applied.

 

There are lots of tools out there that can help us (I use Evernote, Mindjet Mindmapping, Social Bookmarking and Blogging as my core tools), but I haven't yet found the El Dorado of a single tool/application/software that can do it all. This article from Alex provides an outline specification of the ideal system. An opportunity for an entrepreneur - perhaps, to satisfy what I think is a growing need amongst most people grappling with the information torrent.

 

Reading time: 20mins

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, September 4, 2:21 PM

The border between infotention (managing attention and digital media information flows ) and personal knowledge management (organizing and refining information for one's own storage, retrieval, pattern-building, connection-making needs) is a fuzzy one. This graduate student appears to have tried some of the best available tools, including Evernote and Devonthink (which I have used extensively) and Voodoo Pad (which I haven't tried). Finding them all inadequate, Alex lays out requirements for a "personal knowledgebase." 

AlisonMcNab's curator insight, September 6, 4:48 PM

Informative post from @Howard Rheingold

Crystal Renfro's curator insight, September 8, 2:48 PM

This individual does a very detailed job both describing his workflow and what he would like to find in a one-stop shop tool.  All the myriad of comments opens a new flood of tools and ideas to consider.  It reiterates my belief that building interfaces between powerful tools that achieve different purposes may be the way to go... it goes back to what docear.com is trying to do.... the downside is that interfaces break very easily as different apps upgrade their products and thus makes the interface unstable.

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Data Is Beautiful is a hidden gem for gorgeous data visualizations

Data Is Beautiful is a hidden gem for gorgeous data visualizations | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Pretty. And pretty, informative
Stephen Dale's insight:

A (relatively) new Reddit, DataIsBeautiful,  is a new channel that provides a daily roundup of the best data visualizations. Worth following.

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How the Internet of Things Will Change Business

How the Internet of Things Will Change Business | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Are companies ready for billions of everyday objects to join the Internet?

Via Paul Aneja - eTrends
Stephen Dale's insight:

As computers with wireless capability become cheap, it’s becoming affordable to connect more things to the Internet, like sensors in sewer pipes, factory machinery, lights, and home appliances.


Perhaps we should be asking ourselves..."what could possibly go wrong?"!

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Paul Aneja - eTrends's curator insight, July 18, 3:24 PM

For last several years, technology industry is preparing for the Internet of things, a type of computing characterized by small, often dumb, usually unseen computers attached to objects. These devices sense and transmit data about the environment or offer new means of controlling it.


As computers with wireless capability become cheap, it’s becoming affordable to connect more things to the Internet, like sensors in sewer pipes, factory machinery, lights, and home appliances.


What are some new applications of Internet of Things, that you are looking to leverage in the next 3 years?

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How Data Will Transform Science

How Data Will Transform Science | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
While the rest of the world has become a highly connected place, driven by new approaches to data and technology, science remains, to an alarming degree, stuck in the last century.
Stephen Dale's insight:

Science has been a cottage industry, but needs to move to an industrial scale where we’re integrating more skills such as gathering, analyzing and interpreting data.

 

We increasingly live in an age of cognitive collaboration, in which humans use machines to more effectively work with other humans.  

We are in the midst of a new industrial revolution in which we are beginning to use machines not just to augment our physical capabilities, but our mental ones as well.  Most, if not all, aspects of human experience are being rapidly transformed. Business life has already been significantly altered, but science still needs to catch up.


The mathematician Samuel Arbesman foresees computers making discoveries scientists don't understand.


Bernie Meyerson, the Chief Innovation Officer at IBM, believes that there is a revolution taking place.  Rather than having to invest in massive labs to pursue a new area, he says that now, “you can stand up a world class laboratory much faster and you can also shut it down and move on when it doesn’t work out.  You can just be more agile.”


Reading time: 10 mins

Data/Information relevance: 9/10

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Turning big data into better health outcomes

Turning big data into better health outcomes | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

Population health management technology offers three levels of functionality. First is an analytics capability that lets organizations identify patients who would benefit from participating in some form of care management program. Second is a workflow function and the ability to create personalized care plans for individual patients, Burghard said. And third, a population health platform provides a communications component that enables organizations to communicate with individual patients and the wider community.Population health management is a multifaceted, many-layered endeavor that nevertheless has a common theme: the need for data and the ability to mine it for actionable information.

 

A broad spectrum of health care players -- individual providers, hospital systems, payers, local public health departments and federal agencies -- are all in some way addressing population health management. The approach involves identifying populations, assessing their disease status and developing appropriate responses, such as management programs for chronic diseases. Those activities require access to data -- and plenty of it.


Via Andrew Spong
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Comment: Will editing disputes mean the end for Wikipedia?

Comment: Will editing disputes mean the end for Wikipedia? | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Wikipedia is a paradox and a miracle—a crowdsourced encyclopedia that has become the default destination for nonessential information. That it has survived almost 15 years and remained the top Google result for a vast number of searches is a testament to the impressive vision of founder Jimmy Wales and the devotion of its tens of thousands of volunteer editors.
Stephen Dale's insight:

A warts and all treatise on the current and going issues that threaten the future of our favourite online encyclopedia. This is just a flavour:

 

“The encyclopedia that anyone can edit” is at risk of becoming, in computer scientist Aaron Halfaker’s words, “the encyclopedia that anyone who understands the norms, socializes him or herself, dodges the impersonal wall of semiautomated rejection and still wants to voluntarily contribute his or her time and energy can edit.” An entrenched, stubborn elite of old-timers, a high bar to entry, and a persistent 90/10 gender gap among editors all point to the possibility that Wikipedia is going adrift. Because Wikipedia is so unprecedented, I cut it a lot of slack, but precisely for that reason, it faces unanticipated dangers and no easy solution."


Reading time: 12mins

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Lies, Damn Lies And The Myth Of Following The Data

Lies, Damn Lies And The Myth Of Following The Data | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
We are told to follow the data and the truth will be revealed, but data tells many tales and it depends on the data and how you interpret it. It makes me..
Stephen Dale's insight:

At the risk of stating the obvious, data requires context in order to reveal useful (and accurate) information. Context will typically include:

 

- where the data was sourced

- how and when it was collected

- what (if any) processes have been applied (e.g. normalisation)

- who "owns" the data

- what quality criteria has been applied (e.g. de-duplication,  limits etc.)

 (not a definitive list)

 

The article makes the point that - increasingly - data is being used and interpreted by non-data scientists, and hence the need to carefully examine, and maybe challenge, the results, statistics and conclusions that have been extrapolated from the data. In particular, be wary of  those folks in marketing who try to use data to put their products and services in the best possible light. 

 

As the authors says: "Everybody can use data to tell whatever story you want to tell ....." 

 

Reading time: 5mins

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Text Visualization Browser | #dataviz #sna #datascience

Text Visualization Browser | #dataviz #sna #datascience | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Text Visualization Browser

Via luiy
Stephen Dale's insight:

A Visual Survey of Text Visualization Techniques. Excellent resource.

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luiy's curator insight, October 29, 10:06 AM
Text Visualization BrowserDeveloped by Kostiantyn Kucher and Andreas KerrenISOVIS group, Linnaeus University, Växjö, SwedenCheck out our IEEE VIS 2014 poster abstract
DareDo's curator insight, October 30, 6:07 AM

De multiples manières de visualiser des textes...

Sans doute devrions-nous réfléchir à des manières simples d'organiser nos propres textes et nos ressources.

A creuser certainement...

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The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design and the Line Between Editing and Censorship

The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design and the Line Between Editing and Censorship | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
"More isn't always better: no more in information design than in poetry..."

Once again this year, I was delighted to serve on the "Brain
Stephen Dale's insight:

I thought this pick was an excellent example of how data and information can be brought to life with visual aids, in this case, graphics. Though some might argue it is trivia, I particularly liked the way that the graphic design tells a story,. as in the case of the San Francisco cat.

 

Reading time: 10 mins

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The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025

The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025 | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Some 1,606 experts responded to the following question:

The evolution of embedded devices and the Internet/Cloud of Things—As billions of devices, artifacts, and accessories are networked, will the Internet of Things have widespread and beneficial effects on the everyday lives of the public by 2025?

Eighty-three percent of these experts answered “yes” and 17% answered “no.” They were asked to elaborate on their answer and a handful of grand themes ran through their answers:
Stephen Dale's insight:

I missed this when it was first published in May 2014, but decided it is is worthy of a place in this archive.  Pew Research canvassed a number of well-respected researchers, pundits and industry analysts to respond to the question: 

 

"The evolution of embedded devices and the Internet/Cloud of Things—As billions of devices, artifacts, and accessories are networked, will the Internet of Things have widespread and beneficial effects on the everyday lives of the public by 2025?

 

They received 1,606 responses. Eighty-three percent of these experts answered “yes” and 17% answered “no.” They were asked to elaborate on their answers. 

 

There's a lot to digest here, particularly if you want to read the whole report as well as the edited summary. I particularly liked the responses from JP Rangaswami:

 

"The quality of real-time information that becomes available will take the guesswork out of much of capacity planning and decision-making......The net effect will be to reduce waste everywhere: in physical flows and logistics, in the movement of people and goods; in logical flows and logistics, in the movement of ideas and information; decisions will be made faster and better, based on more accurate information; prior errors in assumption and planning will be winkled out more effectively."


And from Howard Rheingold:


"We will live in a world where many things won’t work, and nobody will know how to fix them.”


On a personal note, I can see there might be benefits with the IoT, particularly the use of sensors and actuators for monitoring and improving health, but will it put the final nail in 'privacy' and enable marketers to push their products and control my thoughts 24 x 7 through the pervasive use of wearable devices and biological interfaces with technology?

 

Reading time: 60 mins

 

 

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Google Reveals ‘The Physical Web,’ A Project To Make Internet Of Things Interaction App-Less | TechCrunch

Google Reveals ‘The Physical Web,’ A Project To Make Internet Of Things Interaction App-Less | TechCrunch | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Google's Scott Jenson, an interaction and UX designer who left the company only to return to the Chrome team last November, has revealed a project underway at..
Stephen Dale's insight:

An interesting project from Google - The Physical Web . The idea is to unleash the core superpower of the web to provide interaction on demand. People should be able to walk up to any smart device - a vending machine, a poster, a toy, a bus stop, a rental car - and not have to download an app first. Everything should be just a tap away. 

 

According to Cisco (et al), the number of smart devices is going to explode, and the assumption that each new device will require its own application just isn't realistic. The Physical Web is a system that lets anyone interact with any device at any time. It isn't about replacing native apps: it's about enabling interaction when native apps just aren't practical. Will this be based on open standards? I hope so. 

 

Reading time: 5 mins.

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We Need Online Alter Egos Now More Than Ever | WIRED

We Need Online Alter Egos Now More Than Ever | WIRED | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Online, I use my real name for many things. But sometimes, I prefer to use a pseudonym. Not because I want to anonymously harass people or post incendiary comments unscathed; no, I simply want to manage the impression I make, while still participating in diverse conversations and communities.
Stephen Dale's insight:

From the article:

 

The chilling effect of insisting on real names stifles political and other controversial discussions, inhibiting people from stating their views on gun laws, feminism, terrorism, abortion, climate change and so on. When such debates are held face to face, in cafes and over dinner tables, there is little concern that, say, a future employer will learn what you said and decline to hire you (unless you have the misfortune to live in a regime with a Stasi-like network of citizen-spies), but as the internet increasingly becomes the venue of choice for such discussions, any opinion stated under your real name is trivially accessible. For anyone in a vulnerable position – people seeking a job, people whose beliefs are at odds with their neighbors or co-workers – the ability to participate in such discussions depends, effectively, on being able to do so pseudonymously.


Reading time: 10 mins

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Why Evernote is Amazing · alicedaer · Storify

A collection of articles, blog posts, tutorials, and ideas for making Evernote your best friend ever.

Via Howard Rheingold
Stephen Dale's insight:

I couldn't survive with Evernote, but this is a useful introduction to anyone who hasn't yet discovered this powerful information management system. It's also a good example of how to use Storify as a tutorial tool. 

 

Reading time: 10mins

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, September 5, 4:03 PM

Alice Daer is an experienced educator -- I've followed her for years. Here she Storifies a compendium of resources about using Evernote, which has become one of my most used infotention tools.

NLafferty's curator insight, October 28, 5:25 AM

Evernote is one of the tools I highlight the usefulness of to students. Great list of tips and resources highlighting how to get the best of it including linking it up with IFTTT.

David Stewart's curator insight, November 5, 11:47 AM

had it for ages - must learn to use it properly, anyone else feel the same?

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Recap of 2014 Open Knowledge Festival | Opensource.com

Recap of 2014 Open Knowledge Festival | Opensource.com | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Three things learned at the 2014 Open Knowledge Festival on the state of open data and open access.
Stephen Dale's insight:

A useful summary of some of the key take-aways from the 2014 Open Knowledge Festival, courtesy of Tariq Khokhar

 

From the article:

 

1. There are some great open data initiatives around the world and two common themes are the need for a strong community of technologically literate data re-users, and the sustained effort needed within governments to change how they create, manage and publish data in the long term.


2. Spreadsheets are code and we can adopt some software engineering practices to make much better use of them. There are a number of powerful tools and approaches to data handing being pioneered by the scientific community and those working in other fields can adopt and emulate many of them.


3. Open data fundamentally needs open source software. App reuse often doesn’t happen because contexts are too different. Reusable software components can reduce the development overhead for creating locally customized civic software applications and a pool of high quality civic software components is a valuable public good worth contributing to.


Reading time: 15mins
#opendata


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Revealed: Whitehall plans to share your private data - Telegraph

Revealed: Whitehall plans to share your private data - Telegraph | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Driving licences, criminal records and energy use data could be shared under radical plans to link government databases
Stephen Dale's insight:

Details of the financial history, qualifications and property wealth of millions of Britons could be shared across Whitehall for the first time without their consent. Information including voters’ driving licences, criminal records, energy use and even whether they use a bus pass could be shared under a radical blueprint to link up thousands of state databases used by schools, councils, police and civil servants.


The proposals are contained in a “discussion document” produced by the Cabinet Office Data Sharing Policy Team in April, and whilst Ministers are aware of public concerns about privacy, they are split as to when the public should be consulted.

 

Ministers believe the ability to aggregate and “mine” citizens’ data under a new legal framework will allow them to better monitor economic growth and population movements, identify troubled families and elderly people in need of support, and cut fraud.

 

The proposals are likely to ignite privacy concerns if officials are granted unprecedented access to citizens’ private data.

It will also trigger fears that data could be lost, in the wake of a notorious error in 2007 that saw CDs carrying the child benefit records of 25 million people go missing in the post.


Groups including Liberty and Big Brother Watch have already been consulted.

 

The proposals, drawn up by Francis Maude, will be contained in a White Paper published in the Autumn. It may feature draft legislation for introduction after the 2015 election. 

 

At present, people’s personal information is governed by the Data Protection Act and a web of legislation, often decades old, that underpins different government bodies – making it all but impossible for it to be shared outside one department without the specific investigatory powers granted to police and tax inspectors.

 

What could possibly got wrong?!

 

Reading time: 8 mins

Relevance to privacy: 9/10

 

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Best TED videos on Data Visualization « Big Data Made Simple

Best TED videos on Data Visualization « Big Data Made Simple | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Visualization is critical to data analysis. Data by itself, consisting of bits and bytes stored in a computer hard drive, is invisible. In order to be able to see and make any sense of data, we need to visualize it. Watch these TED videos to get deep insights on Data
Stephen Dale's insight:

A useful curated assembly of TED talks on the art and science of data visualization. #bigdata #viz

 

Total viewing time  for all presentations: : 213 minutes

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Fifteen open data insights | Tim's Blog

Fifteen open data insights | Tim's Blog | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Stephen Dale's insight:

An an excellent summary of key learnings for Open Data use, abstracted from the Open Data in Developing Countries project coordinated by Tim Davies. More information about the project is available at:

 

http://www.opendataresearch.org/emergingimpacts/

 

Reading time: 7 minutes.

Open Data relevance: 9/10

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Amazon Will Sell You Things Before You Know You Want to Buy Them

Amazon Will Sell You Things Before You Know You Want to Buy Them | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Amazon is working a plan that would ship products to you before you even purchase them because Amazon knows what you want better than you do.
Stephen Dale's insight:

Amazon has files a patent for "anticipatory shipping", which is aimed to cutting delivery times for purchases. It us using big data analytics to determine what products are most popular for different geographical areas, where it may set up "store and forward" depots.

 

According to the patent, Amazon can put something on a truck and have it "speculatively shipped to a physical address". 


A interesting if "predictable" use of big data (excuse pun)

#bigdata

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