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Healthcare's Big Problem With Little Data

Healthcare's Big Problem With Little Data | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Every year, the analyst firm Gartner publishes between 90 and 100 "Hype Cycles" with insight on about 1,900 different technologies.
Stephen Dale's insight:

According to Gartner, Big Data has about 2-5 years before reaching it’s ”Plateau of Productivity.” That’s the enviable point at which a technology finally delivers predictable value. The promise of Big Data, of course, is a treasure trove of high value across many industries  – including healthcare. Everything from predictive and prescriptive analytics to population health, disease management, drug discovery and personalized medicine (delivered with much greater precision and higher efficacy) to name but a few.

 

Big Data is clearly where all the excitement and headlines are, but it’s the little data that is likely to have the most effect on our individual healthcare. That is at least until Big Data gets well beyond its “peak of inflated expectations” and closer to its “plateau of productivity.” The question then is – which vendors are likely to be around in 2-to-5 years?

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Data & Informatics
The application and usage of data along with the interaction between people, organisations and technology
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Social Media Strategy: Why Insight and Evidence is So Important

Social Media Strategy: Why Insight and Evidence is So Important | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

Via janlgordon
Stephen Dale's insight:

A timely call for a dispassionate, unbiassed and "agnostic" analysis of data to discover what it is really telling us, and then acting on this information. Sounds obvious? Then why are we so often misled through our ignorance of good and accurate data analysis? 

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Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 7:36 AM
Thanks for sharing:)
Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 7:36 AM
Thanks for sharing:)+
Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 7:37 AM
Thanks for sharing:)
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We Need Online Alter Egos Now More Than Ever | WIRED

We Need Online Alter Egos Now More Than Ever | WIRED | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Online, I use my real name for many things. But sometimes, I prefer to use a pseudonym. Not because I want to anonymously harass people or post incendiary comments unscathed; no, I simply want to manage the impression I make, while still participating in diverse conversations and communities.
Stephen Dale's insight:

From the article:

 

The chilling effect of insisting on real names stifles political and other controversial discussions, inhibiting people from stating their views on gun laws, feminism, terrorism, abortion, climate change and so on. When such debates are held face to face, in cafes and over dinner tables, there is little concern that, say, a future employer will learn what you said and decline to hire you (unless you have the misfortune to live in a regime with a Stasi-like network of citizen-spies), but as the internet increasingly becomes the venue of choice for such discussions, any opinion stated under your real name is trivially accessible. For anyone in a vulnerable position – people seeking a job, people whose beliefs are at odds with their neighbors or co-workers – the ability to participate in such discussions depends, effectively, on being able to do so pseudonymously.


Reading time: 10 mins

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Why Evernote is Amazing · alicedaer · Storify

A collection of articles, blog posts, tutorials, and ideas for making Evernote your best friend ever.

Via Howard Rheingold
Stephen Dale's insight:

I couldn't survive with Evernote, but this is a useful introduction to anyone who hasn't yet discovered this powerful information management system. It's also a good example of how to use Storify as a tutorial tool. 

 

Reading time: 10mins

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, September 5, 4:03 PM

Alice Daer is an experienced educator -- I've followed her for years. Here she Storifies a compendium of resources about using Evernote, which has become one of my most used infotention tools.

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Recap of 2014 Open Knowledge Festival | Opensource.com

Recap of 2014 Open Knowledge Festival | Opensource.com | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Three things learned at the 2014 Open Knowledge Festival on the state of open data and open access.
Stephen Dale's insight:

A useful summary of some of the key take-aways from the 2014 Open Knowledge Festival, courtesy of Tariq Khokhar

 

From the article:

 

1. There are some great open data initiatives around the world and two common themes are the need for a strong community of technologically literate data re-users, and the sustained effort needed within governments to change how they create, manage and publish data in the long term.


2. Spreadsheets are code and we can adopt some software engineering practices to make much better use of them. There are a number of powerful tools and approaches to data handing being pioneered by the scientific community and those working in other fields can adopt and emulate many of them.


3. Open data fundamentally needs open source software. App reuse often doesn’t happen because contexts are too different. Reusable software components can reduce the development overhead for creating locally customized civic software applications and a pool of high quality civic software components is a valuable public good worth contributing to.


Reading time: 15mins
#opendata


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Revealed: Whitehall plans to share your private data - Telegraph

Revealed: Whitehall plans to share your private data - Telegraph | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Driving licences, criminal records and energy use data could be shared under radical plans to link government databases
Stephen Dale's insight:

Details of the financial history, qualifications and property wealth of millions of Britons could be shared across Whitehall for the first time without their consent. Information including voters’ driving licences, criminal records, energy use and even whether they use a bus pass could be shared under a radical blueprint to link up thousands of state databases used by schools, councils, police and civil servants.


The proposals are contained in a “discussion document” produced by the Cabinet Office Data Sharing Policy Team in April, and whilst Ministers are aware of public concerns about privacy, they are split as to when the public should be consulted.

 

Ministers believe the ability to aggregate and “mine” citizens’ data under a new legal framework will allow them to better monitor economic growth and population movements, identify troubled families and elderly people in need of support, and cut fraud.

 

The proposals are likely to ignite privacy concerns if officials are granted unprecedented access to citizens’ private data.

It will also trigger fears that data could be lost, in the wake of a notorious error in 2007 that saw CDs carrying the child benefit records of 25 million people go missing in the post.


Groups including Liberty and Big Brother Watch have already been consulted.

 

The proposals, drawn up by Francis Maude, will be contained in a White Paper published in the Autumn. It may feature draft legislation for introduction after the 2015 election. 

 

At present, people’s personal information is governed by the Data Protection Act and a web of legislation, often decades old, that underpins different government bodies – making it all but impossible for it to be shared outside one department without the specific investigatory powers granted to police and tax inspectors.

 

What could possibly got wrong?!

 

Reading time: 8 mins

Relevance to privacy: 9/10

 

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Best TED videos on Data Visualization « Big Data Made Simple

Best TED videos on Data Visualization « Big Data Made Simple | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Visualization is critical to data analysis. Data by itself, consisting of bits and bytes stored in a computer hard drive, is invisible. In order to be able to see and make any sense of data, we need to visualize it. Watch these TED videos to get deep insights on Data
Stephen Dale's insight:

A useful curated assembly of TED talks on the art and science of data visualization. #bigdata #viz

 

Total viewing time  for all presentations: : 213 minutes

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Fifteen open data insights | Tim's Blog

Fifteen open data insights | Tim's Blog | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Stephen Dale's insight:

An an excellent summary of key learnings for Open Data use, abstracted from the Open Data in Developing Countries project coordinated by Tim Davies. More information about the project is available at:

 

http://www.opendataresearch.org/emergingimpacts/

 

Reading time: 7 minutes.

Open Data relevance: 9/10

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Amazon Will Sell You Things Before You Know You Want to Buy Them

Amazon Will Sell You Things Before You Know You Want to Buy Them | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Amazon is working a plan that would ship products to you before you even purchase them because Amazon knows what you want better than you do.
Stephen Dale's insight:

Amazon has files a patent for "anticipatory shipping", which is aimed to cutting delivery times for purchases. It us using big data analytics to determine what products are most popular for different geographical areas, where it may set up "store and forward" depots.

 

According to the patent, Amazon can put something on a truck and have it "speculatively shipped to a physical address". 


A interesting if "predictable" use of big data (excuse pun)

#bigdata

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Google Offers Webform To Comply With Europe’s ‘Right To Be Forgotten’ Ruling | TechCrunch

Google Offers Webform To Comply With Europe’s ‘Right To Be Forgotten’ Ruling | TechCrunch | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Live in the European Union and want some old, irrelevant info about you deleted from search results? Google has now implemented a search removal request..
Stephen Dale's insight:

Google has provided a webform  for users to request data be removed following a European Court Of Justice ruling earlier this month which said that Google must respect a “right to be forgotten” and, at the request of private individuals, remove “irrelevant” and outdated information that contravenes an EU privacy directive concerning the way personal data is processed.


Jimmy Wales has been quoted as saying the ruling is “ridiculous” and “very bizarre”, pointing out that it could lead to a scenario where a newspaper can publish information but a search engine can’t link to it. Or that a smaller search engine with no business footprint in Europe is able to display information that a larger search engine such as Google can’t. Censorship of information is the spectre that critics of the ruling are invoking.

 

Some details here that are not included in the article if you think you are affected:

 

Applicants are asked to give their name, link addresses for removal from search result and provide proof of identity.

 

Only EU citizens can request to take down links and only where their name appears, unless they legally represent a person. They must explain how search results are "irrelevant, outdated or otherwise inappropriate". 

 

Google will balance the right to privacy with the public interest.

 

In Britain, users can resort to the Information Commissioner's Office, or take Google to court.

 

#privacy #Google

 

 

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Giants behaving badly: Google, Facebook and Amazon show us the downside of monopolies and black-box algorithms

Giants behaving badly: Google, Facebook and Amazon show us the downside of monopolies and black-box algorithms | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Google, Facebook and Amazon have shown us again this week why the combination of a quasi-monopoly, vested interests and an inscrutable algorithm can be a dangerous thing for internet users, since it allows them to influence what we see, know and buy
Stephen Dale's insight:

None of this surprises me, and though I suspect that we still have a silent majority of people out there who seem happy with "good enough" or skewed search results - I'm encouraged by the growth of non-algorithmic content curation websites, managed by individuals or communities that care more about understanding their audience. I actively seek out such websites - whether it's best Wordpress plugins, top 50 books (based on numbers of downloads or user reviews), or most popular album tracks. I appreciate that even some of these sites are open to manipulation, but not on the scale of the examples cited here, and apart form which, most of them are quite open about the way they curate their content - and it's a an area where reputations still matter. 

I don't think we're ever likely to understand Googles algorithms (and if we did they'd be changed), and if we do want to begin taking back control of the Internet from Google's/Amazon's/Facebook's vested interests, we should support the content curators - or become curators ourselves!

 

#seo #curation

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Perjury's comment, May 25, 10:28 AM
I think it's a little unfair to describe Google as 'behaving badly' (in this instance anyway). Google has to constantly tweak its algorithms to keep one step ahead of the spammers and spammy sites: this is a good thing. It is unfortunate that some otherwise legitimate and non-spammy sites will be negatively affected as well by these imperfect and 'blind' algorithms.
Stephen Dale's comment, May 26, 6:31 AM
I agree - Google are no worse than any other proprietary search engine vendor, except they are the biggest, and consequently likely to attract the most attention. I wonder though, howe many people think they are getting the most relevant results for any search query, as opposed to the skewed results that come from machine algorithms? Hence my point about the greater transparency available from human-curated content (e.g. lists). Not that these are perfect, but you know how the content had been created.
Perjury's comment, May 26, 10:22 AM
That's precisely why Google constantly tweaks its algorithm - to ensure you get the 'most relevant' results not ones skewed by spammers. Of course, it does also depend on what you mean by 'most relevant'.
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5 Reasons to learn D3 - Programming - O'Reilly Media

5 Reasons to learn D3 - Programming - O'Reilly Media | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=molJiqEJa9U d3.js is all the buzz among designers and developers making data visualizations on the web. But why? 1. D3 doesn't stand for data-design dictator It actually stands for...
Stephen Dale's insight:

What is D3? :Data-Driven Documents

 

D3 allows you to bind arbitrary data to a Document Object Model (DOM), and then apply data-driven transformations to the document. For example, you can use D3 to generate an HTML table from an array of numbers. Or, use the same data to create an interactive SVG bar chart with smooth transitions and interaction.

 

D3 is not a monolithic framework that seeks to provide every conceivable feature. Instead, D3 solves the crux of the problem: efficient manipulation of documents based on data. This avoids proprietary representation and affords extraordinary flexibility, exposing the full capabilities of web standards such as CSS3, HTML5 and SVG. With minimal overhead, D3 is extremely fast, supporting large datasets and dynamic behaviors for interaction and animation. D3’s functional style allows code reuse through a diverse collection of components and plugins.

 

#data #viz

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Big data: are we making a big mistake? - FT.com

Big data: are we making a big mistake? - FT.com | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Five years ago, a team of researchers from Google announced a remarkable achievement in one of the world’s top scientific journals, Nature. Without needing the results of a single medical check-up, they were nevertheless able to track the spread of
Stephen Dale's insight:

A highly recommended article from the FT, questioning the massive hype around Big Data - with four case studies that reinforce why we need to critically question the quality, accuracy and relevance of the information that current big data analytics and search algorithms reveal.

 

From the article:

 

"Recall big data’s four articles of faith. Uncanny accuracy is easy to overrate if we simply ignore false positives.

 

The claim that causation has been “knocked off its pedestal” is fine if we are making predictions in a stable environment but not if the world is changing or if we ourselves hope to change it.

 

The promise that “N = All”, and therefore that sampling bias does not matter, is simply not true in most cases that count. As for the idea that “with enough data, the numbers speak for themselves” – that seems hopelessly naive in data sets where spurious patterns vastly outnumber genuine discoveries.

 

“Big data” has arrived, but big insights have not. The challenge now is to solve new problems and gain new answers – without making the same old statistical mistakes on a grander scale than ever."

 

Insight: 9/10

Relevance: 9/10 

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7 Big Problems with the Internet of Things

7 Big Problems with the Internet of Things | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Reality is beginning to bite the Internet of Things (IoT). After months of enthusiastic discussion about  the opportunities it will provide and how much it will be worth, many of those looking to play in the IoT space are starting to look at the potential problems, including data management.  Though everyone knows managing data will be a problem once the IoT is up and running at full scale, few have really considered the potential data storage problems. Topic: Internet of Things.
Stephen Dale's insight:

A recent Gartner Report identifies seven key issues with the Internet of Things (IoT):

 

1. Security: Many industry-specific security platforms are being developed for specialist areas like industrialized systems, medical equipment, and air and defense sectors and, in many cases, being integrated into the platforms being developed by equipment providers for those industries.


2. Enterprises: There will be significant security challenges from the increasing amount of data with the myriad of devices increasing security complexity.


3. Consumer Privacy: The challenge of securing the personal data of individuals as the consumer goods they use become increasingly digitized.


4. Data: IT administrators that are already tasked with keeping the storage centers running, will also have to figure out how to store, protect and make all the incoming data accessible.


5. Storage Management: Businesses will have weigh up the economics of storage against the value of IoT information.


6. Server Technologies: Some organizations that manage and consume data collected from a huge array of devices will require additional compute capacity and may well increase server budgets if there is a business case for it.


7. Data Centre Network: Existing data center WAN (Wide Area Network) links have been built for moderate-bandwidth requirements created by our current use of technology. However, as the amount of data being transferred is set to increase dramatically, the need for expanded bandwidth grows.

 

The risk., therefore, is ensuring that real-time business processes are not impacted by the data management overheads of the IoT.

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Heralding the Internet of Things: How Will it Impact Business Owners?

Heralding the Internet of Things: How Will it Impact Business Owners? | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
While it is not universally accepted wisdom, there is a growing sense that artificial intelligence will supersede human intelligence at some point during the next 100 years. This will ultimately see …
Stephen Dale's insight:

According to a report by BI intelligence, the number of devices using the Internet of Things is estimated at a just under 2 billion. By 2018, this figure is expected to rise to 9 billion, as the technology continues to be refined and sophisticated to include new applications.


Analysts and marketing types (of course) are heralding a utopian vision where everything will be connected, and perfect, bug-free applications will manage our privacy and security and put us in ultimate control of - well - everything critical to our existence. Not even our fridge will know where we are!  What could possibly go wrong?!


Reading time 5 mins

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Who Owns Your Data?

Who Owns Your Data? | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Alistair Croll is the co-chair of O’Reilly’s Strata conference, which tackles the convergence of Big Data, ubiquitous computing, and new interfaces. The next Strata event happen...
Stephen Dale's insight:

Particularly relevant abstract from the article:


"The important question isn’t who owns the data. Ultimately, we all do. A better question is, who owns the means of analysis? Because that’s how, as Brand suggests, you get the right information in the right place. The digital divide isn’t about who owns data — it’s about who can put that data to work."


Reading time: 10mins

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Designing a Personal Knowledgebase

"Since so much knowledge is now digital, there is no shortage of material from which I can learn. On the contrary, I’m usually drowning in too much information. But that’s a discussion for another day. For me, right now, the major problem is that I lack an easy and effective system for capturing and recording my learning. My memory alone will not suffice. What I need is a personal knowledgebase, which I define as an external, integrated digital repository for the things I learn and the resources from which they come.


Many have tried to solve the problem I’m encountering now, and numerous digital solutions exist. Some of the most popular options include Evernote, Devonthink, and Voodoo Pad. Over the course of my graduate studies, I’ve tried many of these programs, but all have fallen short of what I really need, given my own workflow."


Via Howard Rheingold
Stephen Dale's insight:

We live in an age where information is all around us, all of the time. Sometimes we seek it out, other times it comes to us, uninvited. The only way we can learn from and apply this information (actionable knowledge) is by having the tools and know-how to be able to sort, sense, filter, organise and ultimately retrieve this information within a context where it can be applied.

 

There are lots of tools out there that can help us (I use Evernote, Mindjet Mindmapping, Social Bookmarking and Blogging as my core tools), but I haven't yet found the El Dorado of a single tool/application/software that can do it all. This article from Alex provides an outline specification of the ideal system. An opportunity for an entrepreneur - perhaps, to satisfy what I think is a growing need amongst most people grappling with the information torrent.

 

Reading time: 20mins

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, September 4, 2:21 PM

The border between infotention (managing attention and digital media information flows ) and personal knowledge management (organizing and refining information for one's own storage, retrieval, pattern-building, connection-making needs) is a fuzzy one. This graduate student appears to have tried some of the best available tools, including Evernote and Devonthink (which I have used extensively) and Voodoo Pad (which I haven't tried). Finding them all inadequate, Alex lays out requirements for a "personal knowledgebase." 

AlisonMcNab's curator insight, September 6, 4:48 PM

Informative post from @Howard Rheingold

Crystal Renfro's curator insight, September 8, 2:48 PM

This individual does a very detailed job both describing his workflow and what he would like to find in a one-stop shop tool.  All the myriad of comments opens a new flood of tools and ideas to consider.  It reiterates my belief that building interfaces between powerful tools that achieve different purposes may be the way to go... it goes back to what docear.com is trying to do.... the downside is that interfaces break very easily as different apps upgrade their products and thus makes the interface unstable.

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Data Is Beautiful is a hidden gem for gorgeous data visualizations

Data Is Beautiful is a hidden gem for gorgeous data visualizations | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Pretty. And pretty, informative
Stephen Dale's insight:

A (relatively) new Reddit, DataIsBeautiful,  is a new channel that provides a daily roundup of the best data visualizations. Worth following.

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How the Internet of Things Will Change Business

How the Internet of Things Will Change Business | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Are companies ready for billions of everyday objects to join the Internet?

Via Paul Aneja - eTrends
Stephen Dale's insight:

As computers with wireless capability become cheap, it’s becoming affordable to connect more things to the Internet, like sensors in sewer pipes, factory machinery, lights, and home appliances.


Perhaps we should be asking ourselves..."what could possibly go wrong?"!

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Paul Aneja - eTrends's curator insight, July 18, 3:24 PM

For last several years, technology industry is preparing for the Internet of things, a type of computing characterized by small, often dumb, usually unseen computers attached to objects. These devices sense and transmit data about the environment or offer new means of controlling it.


As computers with wireless capability become cheap, it’s becoming affordable to connect more things to the Internet, like sensors in sewer pipes, factory machinery, lights, and home appliances.


What are some new applications of Internet of Things, that you are looking to leverage in the next 3 years?

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How Data Will Transform Science

How Data Will Transform Science | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
While the rest of the world has become a highly connected place, driven by new approaches to data and technology, science remains, to an alarming degree, stuck in the last century.
Stephen Dale's insight:

Science has been a cottage industry, but needs to move to an industrial scale where we’re integrating more skills such as gathering, analyzing and interpreting data.

 

We increasingly live in an age of cognitive collaboration, in which humans use machines to more effectively work with other humans.  

We are in the midst of a new industrial revolution in which we are beginning to use machines not just to augment our physical capabilities, but our mental ones as well.  Most, if not all, aspects of human experience are being rapidly transformed. Business life has already been significantly altered, but science still needs to catch up.


The mathematician Samuel Arbesman foresees computers making discoveries scientists don't understand.


Bernie Meyerson, the Chief Innovation Officer at IBM, believes that there is a revolution taking place.  Rather than having to invest in massive labs to pursue a new area, he says that now, “you can stand up a world class laboratory much faster and you can also shut it down and move on when it doesn’t work out.  You can just be more agile.”


Reading time: 10 mins

Data/Information relevance: 9/10

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Turning big data into better health outcomes

Turning big data into better health outcomes | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

Population health management technology offers three levels of functionality. First is an analytics capability that lets organizations identify patients who would benefit from participating in some form of care management program. Second is a workflow function and the ability to create personalized care plans for individual patients, Burghard said. And third, a population health platform provides a communications component that enables organizations to communicate with individual patients and the wider community.Population health management is a multifaceted, many-layered endeavor that nevertheless has a common theme: the need for data and the ability to mine it for actionable information.

 

A broad spectrum of health care players -- individual providers, hospital systems, payers, local public health departments and federal agencies -- are all in some way addressing population health management. The approach involves identifying populations, assessing their disease status and developing appropriate responses, such as management programs for chronic diseases. Those activities require access to data -- and plenty of it.


Via Andrew Spong
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data.parliament – The Blog

Stephen Dale's insight:

data.parliament.uk alpha release is now live. The alpha release includes a limited number of datasets: Commons and Lords Parliamentary Questions and Answers, Lords Divisions and Briefing Papers. The future focus is to provide as much useful data on the platform as possible, as quickly as possible and to be guided by user feedback.

 

The repository uses an open source product called ELDA to provide a configurable way to access RDF data using simple RESTful URLs that are translated into queries to a SPARQL endpoint. The majority of Data in data.parliament is exposed as RDF. 

 

#data #linkeddata

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Infographic: Get More Out Of Google - HackCollege

Infographic: Get More Out Of Google - HackCollege | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Stephen Dale's insight:

A very useful Infographic showing examples of some Google search keywords for delivering higher precision results. Plus a few tips and tricks for the on-line researcher. #google #search

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A Simple Explanation Of 'The Internet Of Things'

A Simple Explanation Of 'The Internet Of Things' | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
The "Internet of things" (IoT) is becoming an increasingly growing topic of conversation both in the workplace and outside of it. It's a concept that not only has the potential to impact how we live but also how we work.  But what exactly is the "Internet of things" and what [...]
Stephen Dale's insight:

Simply put this is the concept of basically connecting any device with an on and off switch to the Internet (and/or to each other). This includes everything from cell phones, coffee makers, washing machines, headphones, lamps, wearable devices and almost anything else you can think of.


But why would we want to connect all of this stuff together? The idea is to automate life as far as possible, and to give us more information about our environment on which to make better (?) decisions. For example, if your car had access to your appointments diary and to satnav it could alert you to traffic delays, select a better route to take and maybe send an email or text to the people you are meeting to warn them that you might be late. 


One of the (many) issues with all of this is how we can effectively store, track analyse and make sense of this huge volume of data. And what about all the issues associated with security and privacy of your date? It's doubtful that anyone will know exactly what data is being collected, where it's being stored and who has access to it.


The article concludes by advising that regardless of whether we're excited or worried about the potential impact on our lives, we should at least try to understand what the IoT is all about. 


My view? What could possibly go wrong! 


 #bigadata #IoT

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CRAAP Test: Evaluating Information Sources


Via Susan Bainbridge
Stephen Dale's insight:

Some useful guidelines to aid critical thinking. #curation

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niftyjock's curator insight, April 8, 6:08 PM

I love check-lists

Manos Koutsoukos's curator insight, April 17, 1:15 AM

Interesting checklist for those who develop their own materials

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Algorithms: The Glue Between Content, Data and Insight

Algorithms: The Glue Between Content, Data and Insight | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

"We are in the era of the algorithm. They decide what news we will see, they decide which person is important and they will even merge more and more into our non-digital lives.

 

But the biggest and realest danger lies in us. If we believe that there is only one truth and that is the one generated by a black-box algorithm we might be deceived easily."

 

A reminder, then, that algorithm's should not take the place of critical thinking.

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Robin Good's curator insight, March 24, 2:25 PM


Lutz Finger, reports from SxSW on the topic of algorithms, curation and the future, as the skills of content creators, data analysts and code programmers are seemingly converging for the first time. 


Among others, he reports Steve Rosenbaum (founder of Magnify.net) significant own words at SxSW: "...a wise combination of human judgement enabled by algorithms will become the new king of content."


But while there are great new tools, startups and ideas leveraging the great potential of big data and human curation, there is a big, invisible danger, still looming on us.


"The danger is that any algorithm might fall prey to someone trying to influence it.

This might be the ones programming the algorithm or the users. We for instance saw governments trying to skew algorithms by introducing fake online personas (
Learn more about the US government persona-management software).
 

But the biggest and realest danger lies in us.

If we believe that there is only one truth and that is the one generated by a black-box algorithm we might be deceived easily."



Informative. Resourceful. 7/10



Full article: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140320132545-6074593-the-age-of-the-algorithms-sxsw-summary 


See also: www.masternewmedia.org/future-of-search


Image: Bjoern Ognibeni - SxSW




Georges Millet's curator insight, March 25, 4:10 AM

Knowledge & life turning today into a (google) search. Algorithms are key!  

Mariale Peñalosa Arguijo's curator insight, March 26, 9:44 AM

 

 10
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A recipe for data: lessons from EUDAT

A recipe for data: lessons from EUDAT | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
EUDAT understands what is important when it comes to common data services.
Stephen Dale's insight:

EUDAT provides an integrated solution for finding, sharing, storing, replicating, staging and performing computations with primary and secondary research data. EUDAT is currently rolling out its first set of data services, with more to come in 2014. Based on your data needs you can pick one or more:-

 

B2SHARE: a user-friendly, reliable and trustworthy way for researchers and communities to store and share small-scale research data coming from diverse contexts.

 

B2SAFE: a robust, safe and highly-available replication service allowing community and departmental repositories to replicate and preserve their research data. Different access and deployment options are offered which range from tailored solutions for Fedora and DSpace repository systems via simplified utilization options to a full integration of repositories with the network of EUDAT data nodes.

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