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Types of Graphs | Graphs.net

Types of Graphs | Graphs.net | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Graphs are a visual treat, as they can present complex information in a quick and easy manner. Mostly graphs are used to reveal a trend, compare statistics or

Via Beth Kanter
Stephen Dale's insight:

A useful overview of different types of graphs and where they might be used.

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Beth Kanter's curator insight, December 30, 2012 4:07 PM

Handy cheat sheet for picking the right chart and graph.  Text description and infographic.    

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Data & Informatics
The application and usage of data along with the interaction between people, organisations and technology
Curated by Stephen Dale
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Social Media Strategy: Why Insight and Evidence is So Important

Social Media Strategy: Why Insight and Evidence is So Important | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

Via janlgordon
Stephen Dale's insight:

A timely call for a dispassionate, unbiassed and "agnostic" analysis of data to discover what it is really telling us, and then acting on this information. Sounds obvious? Then why are we so often misled through our ignorance of good and accurate data analysis? 

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Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 2014 7:36 AM
Thanks for sharing:)
Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 2014 7:36 AM
Thanks for sharing:)+
Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 2014 7:37 AM
Thanks for sharing:)
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Power to the new people analytics | McKinsey & Company

Power to the new people analytics | McKinsey & Company | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Techniques used to mine consumer and industry data may also let HR tackle employee retention and dissatisfaction. A McKinsey Quarterly article.
Stephen Dale's insight:

McKinsey have developed an approach to retention: to detect previously unobserved behavioural patterns, they combine various data sources with machine-learning algorithms. Workshops and interviews are used to generate ideas and a set of hypotheses. Over time they collected hundreds of data points to test. Then ran different algorithms to get insights at a broad organisational level, to identify specific employee clusters, and to make individual predictions. Finally they held a series of workshops and focus groups to validate the insights from our models and to develop a series of concrete interventions.

 

The insights were surprising and at times counterintuitive. They expected factors such as an individual’s performance rating or compensation to be the top predictors of unwanted attrition. But analysis revealed that a lack of mentoring and coaching and of “affiliation” with people who have similar interests were actually top of list. More specifically, “flight risk” across the firm fell by 20 to 40 percent when coaching and mentoring were deemed satisfying.

 

Reading time: 7mins

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Power to the new people analytics | McKinsey & Company

Power to the new people analytics | McKinsey & Company | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

The application of new techniques and new thinking to talent management is becoming more mainstream. The implications are dramatic because talent management in many businesses has traditionally revolved around personal relationships or decision making based on experience—not to mention risk avoidance and legal compliance—rather than deep analysis. Advanced analytics provides a unique opportunity for human-capital and human-resources professionals to position themselves as fact-based strategic partners of the executive board, using state-of-the-art techniques to recruit and retain staff.

Stephen Dale's insight:

Interesting application of data analytics to HR datasets, for the purposes of improving staff loyalty and retention rates.

 

Reading time: 6 mins

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Newsletter Curation: Top 6 Tools and Tips To Curate Your Own Weekly Newsletter

Newsletter Curation: Top 6 Tools and Tips To Curate Your Own Weekly Newsletter | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

Robin Good (arch content curator) offers advice and his top six tools for curating your own weekly newsletter:


Reading time: 5 mins

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Pali's curator insight, March 10, 8:35 AM

Newsletter marketing is a ploy that is being successfully used by many industry tools and these tools can help you setup your newsletter. 

LibrarianLand's curator insight, March 11, 8:48 AM

Might make a good project for students; create your own newsletter.

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, April 5, 12:21 PM

 

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Open Work: Using Social Software To Make Our Work Visible Again - Dion Hinchcliffe's Next-Generation Enterprises

Open Work: Using Social Software To Make Our Work Visible Again - Dion Hinchcliffe's Next-Generation Enterprises | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
RT @dhinchcliffe: @simongterry In case it's interesting, I've described #wol + #socbiz as #openwork: http://t.co/4T7taI2jWR #wolweek http:/…

Via Mumba Cloud
Stephen Dale's insight:

Dion Hinchliffe talks about "Open Work": Open work, like open source, open standards, or even the more prosaic scholastic open house for that matter, has at its core the ethic that hiding the work process in shadows is generally counterproductive. Collaboration and teamwork work best when there is abundant communication, transparency, and therefore most important of all, trust in the process. Open work is the most likely and most direct route to enabling this. #socbiz


Reading time: 10mins

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What the Web Said Yesterday

What the Web Said Yesterday | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
The Web is continually erasing its past. The Wayback Machine aims to preserve its tracks. Jill Lepore reports.
Stephen Dale's insight:

Brewster Kahle is the founder of the Internet Archive (archive.org) and inventor of the Wayback Machine.


The Wayback Machine has archived more than four hundred and thirty billion Web pages.


The Wayback Machine is big, and getting bigger. You can’t search it the way you can search the Web, because it’s too big and what’s in there isn’t sorted, or indexed, or catalogued in any of the many ways in which a paper archive is organized; it’s not ordered in any way at all, except by URL and by date. To use it, all you can do is type in a URL, and choose the date for it that you’d like to look at. It’s more like a phone book than like an archive.


The Library of Congress has archived nine billion pages, the British Library six billion. Those collections, like the collections of most national libraries, are in one way or another dependent on the Wayback Machine; the majority also use Heritrix, the Internet Archive’s open-source code. The British Library and the Bibliothèque Nationale de France backfilled the early years of their collections by using the Internet Archive’s crawls of the .uk and .fr domains.


Copyright is the elephant in the archive.


Reading time: 15 mins

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Prying Eyes: Inside the NSA's War on Internet Security - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Prying Eyes: Inside the NSA's War on Internet Security - SPIEGEL ONLINE | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
US and British intelligence agencies undertake every effort imaginable to crack all types of encrypted Internet communication. The cloud, it seems, is full of holes. The good news: New Snowden documents show that some forms of encryption still cause problems for the NSA.
Stephen Dale's insight:

A "must read" for anyone who cares about personal data privacy.


From the article:


"The fact that large amounts of the cryptographic systems that underpin the entire Internet have been intentionally weakened or broken by the NSA and its allies poses a grave threat to the security of everyone who relies on the Internet -- from individuals looking for privacy to institutions and companies relying on cloud computing. Many of these weaknesses can be exploited by anyone who knows about them -- not just the NSA".


Reading time: 15mins



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The manager and the moron | McKinsey & Company

The manager and the moron | McKinsey & Company | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
The computer is a moron. And the stupider the tool, the brighter the master must be, says Peter Drucker. In this Quarterly archive article, he explains how “the dumbest tool we have ever had” will compel managers to think through their actions. A McKinsey Quarterly article.
Stephen Dale's insight:

From the article:

 

Along with vastly increasing the availability of information, the computer will reduce the sheer volume of data that managers have had to cope with. At present the computer is the greatest possible obstacle to management information, because everybody has been using it to produce tons of paper.

 

Now, psychology tells us that the one sure way to shut off all perception is to flood the senses with stimuli. That’s why the manager with reams of computer output on his desk is hopelessly uninformed. That’s why it’s so important to exploit the computer’s ability to give us only the information we want—nothing else. The question we must ask is not, “How many figures can I get?” but “What figures do I need? In what form? When and how?” We must refuse to look at anything else. We no longer have to take figures that mean nothing to us and read them the way a gypsy reads tea leaves.

 

Instead, we must decide on our information needs and how the computer can fill those needs. To do that, we must understand our operating processes, and the principles behind the processes. We must apply knowledge and analysis to them, and convert them to a clerk’s routine. Even a work of genius, thought through and systematized, becomes a routine. Once it has been created, a shipping clerk can do it—or a computer can do it. So, once we have achieved real understanding of what we are doing, we can define our needs and program the computer to fill them.

 

Reading time: 15mins

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Turn Google Docs Into an RSS Reader with ImportFeed

Turn Google Docs Into an RSS Reader with ImportFeed | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
This tutorial shows how to use a Google Docs spreadsheet as an RSS Feed reader (see example). You can aggregate news feeds from different sources into one spreadsheet (similar to alltop, popurls or addictomatic) and then publish it as a web page.

If you have a blog, you can use the same trick to embed RSS feeds in web pages. The Google Docs approach is preferred over Flash or Javascript widgets because here you have complete control over the presentation layout and formatting of content.

Via Howard Rheingold
Stephen Dale's insight:

How to roll your own RSS reader!

 

Reading time: 10mins

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, December 10, 2014 2:58 PM

Another slightly geeky but potentially useful approach to rolling your own RSS feed aggregator (like the previous entry, this one came as a tip from one of my Stanford students, Fang Li).

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12 data maps that sum up London

12 data maps that sum up London | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Stephen Dale's insight:
Geographer Dr James Cheshire and visual designer Oliver Uberti say their book - London: The Information Capital - is not an atlas, but instead a series of data portraits. Some great examples of how data can be brought to life through some imaginative graphics. Reading time: 6 mins
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23 Seldom-Used Ideas for Utilizing Twitter Lists

23 Seldom-Used Ideas for Utilizing Twitter Lists | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
If you’ve read any lists on Twitter tips, whether for beginners or for experts, you’ve likely come across the common advice to use Twitter lists.

Twitter lists are useful, helpful, and effective for managing and optimizing your Twitter experience. There’s also a number of unique ways to go about them.

I researched the topic and found 23 popular and outside-the-box ideas for what to do with your Twitter list. See what I learned in the post below, and add your favorite uses in the comments.

Via Howard Rheingold
Stephen Dale's insight:

Twitter Lists are a great way of tracking people and conversations by theme or meme. Easy to set up, and easy to maintain. I've found them to be a very useful tool for the Curator's toolbox.

 

Reading time: 8 mins

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, October 27, 2014 2:15 PM

When I teach infotention, I show learners how they can curate Twitter lists and use Paper.li to turn the lists into daily briefings by networks of experts on topics of their choosing. Curating, focusing, distilling, and formatting incoming streams of information about precisely the topics that interest you at any time is a key infotention skill. h/t Tracy Vu

NLafferty's curator insight, October 28, 2014 5:16 AM

It's worth having a look at Howard Rheingold's comment on this post where he mentions that he suggests to his students creating Twitter lists and then using Paper.li to create a briefing around the topic or network.  It's not something I've done but sounds like an effective way to curate #FOAMed resources insights to students and trainees. 

Alex Grech's curator insight, October 28, 2014 12:51 PM

For most people who use Twitter for lifelong learning purposes, the 'Eureka' moment tends to be the day they understand how to put lists to good strategic use.

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The Dawn of the Zettabyte Era [INFOGRAPHIC]

The Dawn of the Zettabyte Era [INFOGRAPHIC] | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
It’s common knowledge that the amount of online rich media consumption is increasing exponentially on an annual basis. But how much video traffic is projected o
Stephen Dale's insight:

Though this article is slightly aged, it's still as relevant today as when it was first published in 2011. The use of graphics also gives a useful perspective on how the volume of data is growing and where some of this growth is coming from. No wonder we feel overwhelmed!

 

Reading time: 5 mins

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22 maps and charts that will surprise you

22 maps and charts that will surprise you | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
These 22 charts and maps all told me something I found surprising. Some of them genuinely changed the way I think about the world.
Stephen Dale's insight:

A great example of how data visualisation (in this case, maps) can reveal perspectives that might otherwise go unnoticed.

 

Reading time: 15 mins

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Are you ready to decide? | McKinsey & Company

Are you ready to decide? | McKinsey & Company | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Before doing so, executives should ask themselves two sets of questions. A McKinsey Quarterly article.
Stephen Dale's insight:

Two particular types of bias weigh heavily on the decisions of large corporations—confirmation bias and overconfidence bias. The former describes our unconscious tendency to attach more weight than we should to information that is consistent with our beliefs, hypotheses, and recent experiences and to discount information that contradicts them. Overconfidence bias frequently makes executives misjudge their own abilities, as well as the competencies of the business. It leads them to take risks they should not take, in the mistaken belief that they will be able to control outcomes.

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You Can Be a Trusted Guide To The Most Relevant Information Online: Not Google

You Can Be a Trusted Guide To The Most Relevant Information Online: Not Google | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it




Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

Put simply - Google (and for that matter any commercial search engine) may skew search results to promote their own commercial interests. The question to ask yourself is "are the (search) results good enough?" - I'd say in Google's defence "yes they are".

 

Reading time: 5mins

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rwestby's curator insight, March 29, 8:07 PM

 A bit of a lengthy read but certainly worth a look and the thoughts it provokes.

WSI Digital Wave's curator insight, April 2, 7:22 AM

https://plus.google.com/+PaulMathewsWSI/posts

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, April 5, 12:21 PM

 

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A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute

A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

Now that we have hard data on everything, we no longer make decisions from our hearts, guts or principles.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Stephen Dale's insight:

Data optimisation - the antidote to common sense?

 

Reading time: 8mins

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, March 18, 8:05 AM

Not long ago, our blockbuster business books spoke in unison: Trust your gut. The secret to decision-making lay outside our intellects, across the aisle in our loopy right brains, with their emo melodramas and surges of intuition. Linear thinking was suddenly the royal road to ruin. Dan Ariely’s “Predictably Irrational” tracked the extravagant illogic of our best judgment calls. The “Freakonomics” authors urged us to think like nut jobs. In “Blink,” Malcolm Gladwell counseled abandoning scientific method in favor of snap judgments. Tedious hours of research, conducted by artless cubicle drones, became the province of companies courting Chapter 11. To the artsy dropouts who could barely grasp a polynomial would go the spoils of the serial bull markets.



No more. The gut is dead. Long live the data, turned out day and night by our myriad computers and smart devices. Not that we trust the data, as we once trusted our guts. Instead, we “optimize” it. We optimize for it. We optimize with it.

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Directory of Open Access Journals

Directory of Open Access Journals | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

The aim of the DOAJ is to increase the visibility and ease of use of open access scientific and scholarly journals, thereby promoting their increased usage and impact. The DOAJ aims to be comprehensive and cover all open access scientific and scholarly journals that use a quality control system to guarantee the content.


Via Nik Peachey
Stephen Dale's insight:

An excellent research resource.

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johanna krijnsen's curator insight, March 4, 9:35 PM

DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals uses a quality control system to guarantee the content

Johan van der Merwe's curator insight, March 6, 4:08 AM

Applicable for research

Corrina Phoenix Miss English's curator insight, April 29, 1:40 PM

Hopefully, this will be very useful in academic writing.

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Getting big impact from big data | McKinsey & Company

Getting big impact from big data | McKinsey & Company | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
New technology tools are making adoption by the front line much easier, and that’s accelerating the organizational adaptation needed to produce results. A McKinsey Quarterly article.
Stephen Dale's insight:

Few areas are experiencing more innovation and investment than big data and analytics. New tools and improved approaches across the data-analytics ecosystem are offering ways to deal with the challenge of achieving scale. Three hold particular promise:-


- The emergence of targeted solutions from analytics-based software and service providers that are helping their clients achieve a more direct, and at times faster, impact on the bottom line.


- New self-service tools are building business users’ confidence in analytics. One hot term gaining traction in the analytics world is “democratization.” Getting analytics out of the exclusive hands of the statistics gurus, and into the hands of a broad base of frontline users, is seen as a key building block for scale.


- It’s becoming much easier to automate processes and decision making. Technology improvements are allowing a much broader capture of real-time data (for example, through sensors) while facilitating real-time, large-scale data processing and analysis.


But, do non-expert users of these analytic tools really understand what the algorithms are doing? Isn't there a danger of becoming increasingly dependent on AI and automation and less on human knowledge and common sense?


Reading time: 15mins

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Gapminder World Poster 2013

Gapminder World Poster 2013 | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Stephen Dale's insight:

In general, richer countries have longer lives, but on the same income level there are huge differences in lifespans, especially on Middle Income levels, where most people live. Health outcomes depend a lot on how income is distributed and how it is used.

 

This chart uses the revised exchange rates for Purchasing Power Parity from the World Bank. You can interact with the chart here, or download and print the Gapminder World Poster 2013.

 

Reading time: 15mins

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The World's Biggest Data Breaches, In One Incredible Infographic

The World's Biggest Data Breaches, In One Incredible Infographic | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Seeing them all together is jarring.
Stephen Dale's insight:

The scale and impact of data security breaches are getting bigger as time goes on. Complacency over the gradual erosion of privacy remains consistent!

 

Reading time:10mins

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Comment: Will editing disputes mean the end for Wikipedia?

Comment: Will editing disputes mean the end for Wikipedia? | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Wikipedia is a paradox and a miracle—a crowdsourced encyclopedia that has become the default destination for nonessential information. That it has survived almost 15 years and remained the top Google result for a vast number of searches is a testament to the impressive vision of founder Jimmy Wales and the devotion of its tens of thousands of volunteer editors.
Stephen Dale's insight:

A warts and all treatise on the current and going issues that threaten the future of our favourite online encyclopedia. This is just a flavour:

 

“The encyclopedia that anyone can edit” is at risk of becoming, in computer scientist Aaron Halfaker’s words, “the encyclopedia that anyone who understands the norms, socializes him or herself, dodges the impersonal wall of semiautomated rejection and still wants to voluntarily contribute his or her time and energy can edit.” An entrenched, stubborn elite of old-timers, a high bar to entry, and a persistent 90/10 gender gap among editors all point to the possibility that Wikipedia is going adrift. Because Wikipedia is so unprecedented, I cut it a lot of slack, but precisely for that reason, it faces unanticipated dangers and no easy solution."


Reading time: 12mins

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Lies, Damn Lies And The Myth Of Following The Data

Lies, Damn Lies And The Myth Of Following The Data | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
We are told to follow the data and the truth will be revealed, but data tells many tales and it depends on the data and how you interpret it. It makes me..
Stephen Dale's insight:

At the risk of stating the obvious, data requires context in order to reveal useful (and accurate) information. Context will typically include:

 

- where the data was sourced

- how and when it was collected

- what (if any) processes have been applied (e.g. normalisation)

- who "owns" the data

- what quality criteria has been applied (e.g. de-duplication,  limits etc.)

 (not a definitive list)

 

The article makes the point that - increasingly - data is being used and interpreted by non-data scientists, and hence the need to carefully examine, and maybe challenge, the results, statistics and conclusions that have been extrapolated from the data. In particular, be wary of  those folks in marketing who try to use data to put their products and services in the best possible light. 

 

As the authors says: "Everybody can use data to tell whatever story you want to tell ....." 

 

Reading time: 5mins

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Text Visualization Browser | #dataviz #sna #datascience

Text Visualization Browser | #dataviz #sna #datascience | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Text Visualization Browser

Via luiy
Stephen Dale's insight:

A Visual Survey of Text Visualization Techniques. Excellent resource.

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luiy's curator insight, October 29, 2014 10:06 AM
Text Visualization BrowserDeveloped by Kostiantyn Kucher and Andreas KerrenISOVIS group, Linnaeus University, Växjö, SwedenCheck out our IEEE VIS 2014 poster abstract
DareDo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 AM

De multiples manières de visualiser des textes...

Sans doute devrions-nous réfléchir à des manières simples d'organiser nos propres textes et nos ressources.

A creuser certainement...

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The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design and the Line Between Editing and Censorship

The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design and the Line Between Editing and Censorship | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
"More isn't always better: no more in information design than in poetry..."

Once again this year, I was delighted to serve on the "Brain
Stephen Dale's insight:

I thought this pick was an excellent example of how data and information can be brought to life with visual aids, in this case, graphics. Though some might argue it is trivia, I particularly liked the way that the graphic design tells a story,. as in the case of the San Francisco cat.

 

Reading time: 10 mins

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The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025

The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025 | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Some 1,606 experts responded to the following question:

The evolution of embedded devices and the Internet/Cloud of Things—As billions of devices, artifacts, and accessories are networked, will the Internet of Things have widespread and beneficial effects on the everyday lives of the public by 2025?

Eighty-three percent of these experts answered “yes” and 17% answered “no.” They were asked to elaborate on their answer and a handful of grand themes ran through their answers:
Stephen Dale's insight:

I missed this when it was first published in May 2014, but decided it is is worthy of a place in this archive.  Pew Research canvassed a number of well-respected researchers, pundits and industry analysts to respond to the question: 

 

"The evolution of embedded devices and the Internet/Cloud of Things—As billions of devices, artifacts, and accessories are networked, will the Internet of Things have widespread and beneficial effects on the everyday lives of the public by 2025?

 

They received 1,606 responses. Eighty-three percent of these experts answered “yes” and 17% answered “no.” They were asked to elaborate on their answers. 

 

There's a lot to digest here, particularly if you want to read the whole report as well as the edited summary. I particularly liked the responses from JP Rangaswami:

 

"The quality of real-time information that becomes available will take the guesswork out of much of capacity planning and decision-making......The net effect will be to reduce waste everywhere: in physical flows and logistics, in the movement of people and goods; in logical flows and logistics, in the movement of ideas and information; decisions will be made faster and better, based on more accurate information; prior errors in assumption and planning will be winkled out more effectively."


And from Howard Rheingold:


"We will live in a world where many things won’t work, and nobody will know how to fix them.”


On a personal note, I can see there might be benefits with the IoT, particularly the use of sensors and actuators for monitoring and improving health, but will it put the final nail in 'privacy' and enable marketers to push their products and control my thoughts 24 x 7 through the pervasive use of wearable devices and biological interfaces with technology?

 

Reading time: 60 mins

 

 

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Google Reveals ‘The Physical Web,’ A Project To Make Internet Of Things Interaction App-Less | TechCrunch

Google Reveals ‘The Physical Web,’ A Project To Make Internet Of Things Interaction App-Less | TechCrunch | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Google's Scott Jenson, an interaction and UX designer who left the company only to return to the Chrome team last November, has revealed a project underway at..
Stephen Dale's insight:

An interesting project from Google - The Physical Web . The idea is to unleash the core superpower of the web to provide interaction on demand. People should be able to walk up to any smart device - a vending machine, a poster, a toy, a bus stop, a rental car - and not have to download an app first. Everything should be just a tap away. 

 

According to Cisco (et al), the number of smart devices is going to explode, and the assumption that each new device will require its own application just isn't realistic. The Physical Web is a system that lets anyone interact with any device at any time. It isn't about replacing native apps: it's about enabling interaction when native apps just aren't practical. Will this be based on open standards? I hope so. 

 

Reading time: 5 mins.

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