The 'Presence' Project and the 'Be Here Now' Box: Digital Media and Family Attention | DMLcentral | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

"Enthusiasts and skeptics agree that digital media are attention magnets. The Pew Internet and American Life Project reported that one in six Americans admitted to bumping into someone or something while texting, and a video from a mall surveillance camera that showed a woman falling into a pool while she attended to the screen of her phone has been viewed four million times. Every professor in the world now faces students who no longer look at the professor, other students, their notepads or out the window, but gaze fixedly at their laptops. Sherry Turkle’s book, Alone Together, warned about the dangers of divided attention and Cathy Davidson’s book, Now You See It, presented a more sanguine view of the way our digital practices affect our attention. In my own recent book, Net Smart, the first of the five essential social media attentions I covered was…attention. Now that more of us have been talking about the need for attention literacy, I was heartened to see somebody doing something about it.

 

The Presence Project came to my attention when I helped judge the Learning, Design, and Technology Program student projects at Stanford. Two graduate students “who feel passionate about developing tools for modern families,” sustainability-focused designer Kyle Williams and Emily Goligoski, a researcher in Stanford’s Calming Technology Lab, created a digital and tangible toolkit to help families talk about, explore, and do something about their attentional choices around digital media.

 

When Williams and Goligoski say “toolkit,” they mean a real physical box, along with the exercises they provide to families: The Be Here Now Box is a literal, physical tackle-box-like case containing a set of attention tools." - from the source

 

NOTE: Thanks Howard for that timely posting. Especially when public safety announcements now not only warn drivers not to text while driving. Even mobile apps are asking are you the driver or the passenger before letting you use the application any further. In Washington DC area now there are announcements and signs warning people not to cross streets while texting or even not paying attention because they are talking on the phone. This article and it's citations and the "box" resources would be a great resource for various courses at virtually any grade and even in corporations to improve safety in general.