Education Tech & Tools
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Education Tech & Tools
a lttle of this and little that focused on learning and training with technology
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Digital Humanism — Technology + Liberal Arts

Digital Humanism — Technology + Liberal Arts | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

"Digital Humanism


. . . Technology has bequeathed to the liberal arts a new, more expansive life. But the liberal arts also have lessons to bequeath, and we ignore them at our peril.

 

. . . We are in the midst of a great sea change. Humanists are swimming, and occasionally sinking, in an embarrassment of informational riches. The hierarchies that historically made the liberal arts possible are crumbling. Like it or not, technology is the driving force in a new, digital humanism

 

. . . If we take from the liberal arts one guideline on how to inhabit an increasingly non-analog world, it should be this digital humanities mission statement: 'to remain aware of the uncertain, varied, unruly terrain of human existence even as that existence gets represented in digital form.'" from source: https://medium.com/technology-liberal-arts/

ghbrett's insight:

This blog post while focused on the Digital Humanities can be applied to many other disciplines that traditionally did not engage with computers. Well, there are always exceptions, but the use of information technology, communications, and computing were not pervasive.

 

I remember way back when the Macintosh first came out. I was supporting academic computing for the University of North Carolina System which included the contract for microcomputers. I have a Masters of Fine Arts and so when I planned a visit to one campus I called the Dean of the School of the Arts. I explained I'd like to show her this new computer that supported drawing, typography, and foreign language much better than anything else we had. A new first for the Arts. She wasn't interested. She said that the only computer she needed was between her ears, a pencil in her hand for output, and paper to draw on. Times have changed. A sub-text of this tale is that Technology continues to change for better and sometimes worse. It is important to keep an open mind. It is also important to listen to both sides of discussions about the applications and their value. At the moment I feel deja vu with Cloud Computing and the olde days of Mainframes in glass rooms. What would you do if you couldn't access all the Google apps and services for a week or a month? Some say no problem, others would suffer.

 

As the author of the blog says about a digital humanities mission statement, "to remain aware of the uncertain, varied, unruly terrain of human existence even as that existence gets represented in digital form." Keep your eyes open, look for opportunities, and watch your back. Thanks to @verbagetruck for the reminder.

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+ The Maker Movement and STEM Education

"Margaret Honey and Eric Siegel feel that the Maker Movement has the potential to transform STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) learning.

 

...Makers delight in tinkering, hacking, creating and re-using materials and technology. They have organized themselves into thriving communities, we read, in which they create objects that they are passionate about." from source: http://dyslexia.wordpress.com/

 

ghbrett's insight:

The Maker Movement has created passion in students and others. Students involved with STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) are not only making, but have discovered the delights of tinkering as they learn about topics in this area. This reviewer (not a teacher) believes that children and young adults have the most creative potential when they have been told "that's impossible."  Or just the opposite, if told "that's impossible," they go ahead and prove the nay sayers wrong. So start Tinkering and Making new things.

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ghbrett's curator insight, February 7, 2013 4:00 PM

The Maker Movement has created passion in students and others. Students involved with STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) are not only making, but have discovered the delights of tinkering as they learn about topics in this area. This reviewer (not a teacher) believes that children and young adults have the most creative potential when they have been told "that's impossible."  Or just the opposite, if told "that's impossible," they go ahead and prove the nay sayers wrong. So start Tinkering and Making new things.

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6 Google+ Hangouts All About Education Technology - Edudemic

6 Google+ Hangouts All About Education Technology - Edudemic | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

"Google has jumped feet-first into the world of education and we’re all going to benefit. They’re currently wrapping up a lengthy series of Google+ Hangouts that featured notable educators and thought leaders discussing the current trends and tips we should all know about.

 

From professional development to using YouTube in the classroom, there’s a hangout for everyone. Since I love education technology (and hope you do too), I figured it would be helpful to raise awareness of some recent Google+ Hangouts all about edtech.

 

Want more videos? Click here to view the full listing of past recordings by Google... at:'Google Education on Air' -- https://sites.google.com/site/eduonair/conference-sessions ."

-- from the source: http://edudemic.com/

ghbrett's insight:

Google+ has been somewhat confusing to me and others. I am beginning to learn some of the ins and outs. One function that has proven invaluable to our family is Hangouts where up to 10 people can video conference. Here is an article that explains in detail 6 Education focused Hangouts for people interested or involved in Education. The author also points to another page with recorded hangout sessions that deal with Education and Google Apps for Education. All in all this looks to be a great resource for the Education community.

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IBM senses change with its annual “5-in-5” list for 2012

IBM senses change with its annual “5-in-5” list for 2012 | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it
"As the year nears its close, IBM, as it has every year since 2006, has pulled out the crystal ball and given us its predictions of five innovations that it believes will impact our lives in the next five years. For this year’s “5-in-5” list, IBM has taken a slightly different approach, with each entry on the list relating to our senses. The company believes cognitive computing whereby computers learn rather than passively relying on programming will be at the core of these innovations, enabling systems that will enhance and augment each of our five senses." - from source http://www.gizmag.com/
ghbrett's insight:

This article is much like the New Media Consortium "Horizon Reports" but focusing on the 5 senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing, and seeing. Each sense is a visual graphic based on an authors collection of projections related to that topic. It is worth taking the time to read, view each image, think on the projections, and then go through them one more time with the intent of connection the 5 projections into one holistic projection.

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 18, 2012 6:51 PM

This article is much like the New Media Consortium "Horizon Reports" but focusing on the 5 senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing, and seeing. Each sense is a visual graphic based on an authors collection of projections related to that topic. It is worth taking the time to read, view each image, think on the projections, and then go through them one more time with the intent of connection the 5 projections into one holistic projection.

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Can schools survive in the age of the web?

Can schools survive in the age of the web? | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

"Online, the global appetite for learning is becoming a powerful force. As the author and digital guru Clay Shirky put it in a widely-debated recent blog post, education is being disrupted by “a new story rearranging people’s sense of the possible.”

  The web itself is old news, as are the brute facts of online information‘s dominance; we’ve had Wikipedia for over a decade. What’s new is the increasingly trusting eyes we turn towards online media for something more fundamental: the skills, knowledge and instruction required to thrive in the modern world.

  “The possibility MOOCs hold out isn’t replacement,” Shirky observes. Rather, it’s that “education can be unbundled.” Much like many other fields – from broadcasting and newspapers to games and shopping – technology promises not so much to replace older institutions as to break up the packages they once offered, providing particular parts of them at a scale and cost unmatchable by the old order.
...
  For those who don’t realise this – and soon – the future of education is likely to prove an uncomfortable place." - from the source: http://www.bbc.com/

 

NOTE: This is a very interesting article from BBC.com about eLearning and it's impact on traditional educational and training methodologies. There are a number of useful citations beyond just Mr. Shirky's insights. This is a worth while reading.

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Innovations in Education - Developing Future Workskills Through Content Curation

Innovations in Education - Developing Future Workskills Through Content Curation | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

My continued thoughts on the benefits of content curation for students.


Via Nancy White
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Zhang Meilan's curator insight, March 18, 2013 1:08 AM

教育创新——通过内容策展发展未来工作技能。

作者 Nancy,以概念图的形式,展示了内容策展能够培养的9种能力,包括

好奇心、媒体素养、跨学科建立联系、信息素养、评价和理解各种观点、综合和评价信息以及较强的自我指导等能力。
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Biological transistor enables computing within living cells, Stanford study says- Office of Communications & Public Affairs - Stanford University School of Medicine

Biological transistor enables computing within living cells, Stanford study says- Office of Communications & Public Affairs - Stanford University School of Medicine | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

".. a team of Stanford University bioengineers has taken computing beyond mechanics and electronics into the living realm of biology. In a paper published March 28 in Science, the team details a biological transistor made from genetic material — DNA and RNA — in place of gears or electrons. The team calls its biological transistor the “transcriptor."

 

'Transcriptors are the key component behind amplifying genetic logic — akin to the transistor and electronics,' said Jerome Bonnet, PhD, a postdoctoral scholar in bioengineering and the paper’s lead author..

 

... To bring the age of the biological computer to a much speedier reality, Endy and his team have contributed all of BIL gates to the public domain so that others can immediately harness and improve upon the tools.

 

'Most of biotechnology has not yet been imagined, let alone made true. By freely sharing important basic tools everyone can work better together,' Bonnet said.

 

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Townshend Lamarre Foundation." from source: http://med.stanford.edu/

ghbrett's insight:

It has been a decade or so that people have discussed the possibility of biological computers or computing devices. This exciting article describes work done at Stanford University as a joint collaboration of the School of Engineering and the School of Medicine. What is very exciting about their project is that the research team has made all the basic tools and information freely available in the public domain. Open Science and Open Research are a key element, "to bring the age of the biological computer to a much speedier reality," said Drew Endy, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering and the paper’s senior author.

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SocialFish | MUST READ: Clay Shirky on Disruption

SocialFish | MUST READ: Clay Shirky on Disruption | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

"Now, this imminent disruption to higher education that Shirky goes on to describe is not a new topic, at least not in social media circles where we love to discuss the disruption of anything and everything (and, in fact, wrote a book about it).  But the higher education issue is one that I am concerned that not enough associations are thinking about (that I can see).  Associations, most of them anyway, are in the business of professional development for the people in their industries.  Are you positioning yourself to be part of the new world of social learning when it starts to happen overnight?  What happens to the millions of new college graduates in a couple of years who are used to learning online? Will they find the educational resources they need from your association website?  Will it be easy to navigate?  Will they be able to share educational courses, or videos, or quizzes, or anything else with their peers on a topic-by-topic basis?  Will they be able to include their peers, including some who may not specifically be signed up to your webinars, in their learning?  Will they find it easy to conduct online discussions around your educational content with people across the globe and in different time zones?  Will they be able to dip in and out however they please?  Will they be able to get the CE/CME/CPE/CEU and every other continuing education credit they might need in the ways that they need them?" from the source: http://www.socialfish.org/

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ghbrett's curator insight, January 21, 2013 7:47 PM

For the past decade or more Higher Education, among other industries, has lived in a climate of paradox. This reviewer was on the "Academic Computing" side of the fence where the innovators and free range chickens were exploring new technologies (aka "shiny new toy"), but at the same time making contributions to the corpus of knowledge that the Academy demands. On the other side of the fence were the "Administrative Computing" folk. They represented the business aspects of education. Their reputation was much like a secret society that kept everything locked up and hidden from the world. Since then there have been different attempts to blend libraries with academic computing, administrative computing, and oh yes, telephones and television on campus. Pardon the long prelude, but this article is a refreshing lead into a post from Clay Shirkey on the "imminent disruption to higher education" in general from social media, open everything, ubiquitous computing. And believe it or not, the new digital generation does know where the OFF SWITCH is. The problem is that many of the older generation don't know where the ON SWITCH in.

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CNI: MOOCs, Mobility, and Changing Scholarly Practice: CNI's Perspective on 2012 and 2013

Clifford Lynch Executive Director Coalition for Networked Information Opening Plenary Session "MOOCs, Mobility, and Changing Scholarly Practice: CNI's Perspective on 2012 and 2013.


Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
ghbrett's insight:

Clifford Lynch has been a key person for keeping attention on the use of technology in higher education, research, and academic and reseach libraries. His comments are always thought provoking and valuable to those engaged in research and education from administrators to practioners. This program is well worth the time to view.

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Veira Rodriguez's curator insight, January 6, 2013 11:07 PM

changing scholarly practice

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Napster, Udacity, and the Academy -- Clay Shirky

"Once you see this pattern—a new story rearranging people’s sense of the possible, with the incumbents the last to know—you see it everywhere. First, the people running the old system don’t notice the change. When they do, they assume it’s minor. Then that it’s a niche. Then a fad. And by the time they understand that the world has actually changed, they’ve squandered most of the time they had to adapt.

 

It’s been interesting watching this unfold in music, books, newspapers, TV, but nothing has ever been as interesting to me as watching it happen in my own backyard. Higher education is now being disrupted; our MP3 is the massive open online course (or MOOC), and our Napster is Udacity, the education startup.

 

We have several advantages over the recording industry, of course. We are decentralized and mostly non-profit. We employ lots of smart people. We have previous examples to learn from, and our core competence is learning from the past. And armed with these advantages, we’re probably going to screw this up as badly as the music people did."
- from the source: http://www.shirky.com/

 

NOTE: A well written cautious piece about the barriers to diffusion of new media, new technology, and new ways to teach, learn, or train. Definitely worth reading.

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Rebooting the Academy: Tim McCormick, Jeffrey Young: Amazon.com: Kindle Store

"Table of Contents for: Rebooting the Academy 12 Tech Innovators Who Are Transforming Campuses
Introduction - Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Education
1. Salman Khan, Khan Academy
Profile: An Outsider Calls for a Teaching Revolution
Essay: YouTube U. Beats YouSnooze U.
2. Daniel J. Cohen, George Mason University
Profile: A Digital Humanist Puts New Tools in the Hands of Scholars
Essay: Is Google Good for History?
3. François Grey, Tsinghua University
Profile: One Researcher's Solution to the Data Deluge: Enlist `Citizen Scientists'
Essay: Opening Up Science, One Lab at a Time
4. Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Modern Language Association
Profile: An Academic Hopes to Take the MLA Into the Social Web
Essay: Networking the Field
5. Bradley C. Wheeler, Indiana U.
Profile: A Business Professor Turned CIO Practices What He Teaches
Essay: Fixing the High Price of Textbooks
6. Robert W. Mendenhall Western Governors U.
Profile: A President Brings a Revolutionary University to Prominence
Essay: Using Technology to Build a New Kind of University
7. Jim Groom, U. of Mary Washington
Profile: Self-Described `EduPunk' Says Colleges Should Abandon Course-Management Systems
Essay: Innovation As a Communal Act
8. Adrian Sannier, Pearson
Profile: Software Evangelist Wants to Put Learning-Management Software in the Cloud
Essay: Education's Digital Shift: If Not Now, When?
9. Burck Smith, StraighterLine
Profile: Entrepreneur Finds a Way to Offer Credited Courses on the Cheap
Essay: Disrupting College: Lessons from iTunes
10. Candace Thille, Carnegie Mellon U.
Profile: Treating Higher Ed's `Cost Disease' With Supersize Online Courses
Essay: Changing the Production Function in Higher Education
11. Laura Czerniewicz, U. of Cape Town
Profile: Technology Director Turns Cellphones Into Classrooms
Essay: Educational Technology for Equity
12: John P. Wilkin, U. of Michigan
Profile: Grounding Tomorrow's Digital Library in Traditional Values
Essay: The Past, Present, and Future of the HathiTrust Digital Library
Acknowledgements
About the Editors" - Source
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