Education Tech & ...
Follow
Find tag "digital"
2.8K views | +0 today
Education Tech & Tools
a lttle of this and little that focused on learning and training with technology
Curated by ghbrett
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by ghbrett from Distance Ed Archive
Scoop.it!

The 7 Most Powerful Ideas In Learning Available Right Now

The 7 Most Powerful Ideas In Learning Available Right Now | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

"These aren’t single tools to “try,” but news ways to think about how learners access media, how educators define success, and what the roles of immense digital communities should be in popularizing new learning models." from: source: http://www.teachthought.com/


Via Ariana Amorim, Barbara Truman, ghbrett
ghbrett's insight:

This is a good article about shifts from traditional modes of learning and training to come in line with emerging trends in teaching and training. It presents a wholistic concept for how a teacher can combine analog and digital processes and concetps to ensure successful experiences for the learner.

more...
Barbara Truman's curator insight, February 28, 2013 8:12 AM

Many of these principles apply to cross-generational learning that can take place all the time, everywhere if we figure out how to make it so. 

Scooped by ghbrett
Scoop.it!

The 'Presence' Project and the 'Be Here Now' Box: Digital Media and Family Attention | DMLcentral

The 'Presence' Project and the 'Be Here Now' Box: Digital Media and Family Attention | DMLcentral | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

"Enthusiasts and skeptics agree that digital media are attention magnets. The Pew Internet and American Life Project reported that one in six Americans admitted to bumping into someone or something while texting, and a video from a mall surveillance camera that showed a woman falling into a pool while she attended to the screen of her phone has been viewed four million times. Every professor in the world now faces students who no longer look at the professor, other students, their notepads or out the window, but gaze fixedly at their laptops. Sherry Turkle’s book, Alone Together, warned about the dangers of divided attention and Cathy Davidson’s book, Now You See It, presented a more sanguine view of the way our digital practices affect our attention. In my own recent book, Net Smart, the first of the five essential social media attentions I covered was…attention. Now that more of us have been talking about the need for attention literacy, I was heartened to see somebody doing something about it.

 

The Presence Project came to my attention when I helped judge the Learning, Design, and Technology Program student projects at Stanford. Two graduate students “who feel passionate about developing tools for modern families,” sustainability-focused designer Kyle Williams and Emily Goligoski, a researcher in Stanford’s Calming Technology Lab, created a digital and tangible toolkit to help families talk about, explore, and do something about their attentional choices around digital media.

 

When Williams and Goligoski say “toolkit,” they mean a real physical box, along with the exercises they provide to families: The Be Here Now Box is a literal, physical tackle-box-like case containing a set of attention tools." - from the source

 

NOTE: Thanks Howard for that timely posting. Especially when public safety announcements now not only warn drivers not to text while driving. Even mobile apps are asking are you the driver or the passenger before letting you use the application any further. In Washington DC area now there are announcements and signs warning people not to cross streets while texting or even not paying attention because they are talking on the phone. This article and it's citations and the "box" resources would be a great resource for various courses at virtually any grade and even in corporations to improve safety in general.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ghbrett
Scoop.it!

'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives

'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

Many emails now being created, and thus potentially archived by libraries, are the contemporary equivalent not of paper letters, but of phone calls - which, with few exceptions, were unrecorded, and really were lost to history. 

 

... In terms of digital literary archives, one of the lessons for today's archivists is that so-called e-manuscripts are highly unstable, and need early curatorial intervention to secure them against the threats of technological obsolescence. This means that the writers involved become increasingly aware of interest in their papers, and for novelist Jonathan Franzen, this changes everything: 'Unfortunately, I think that once writers become self-conscious about preserving archival material, the game is over...I also don't see how you resist the temptation to select material that suggests the most flattering narratives. And not just select, but actively create!' ..." - from the Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

ghbrett's insight:

This post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

 

more...
ghbrett's curator insight, January 13, 2013 8:13 AM

his post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

Scooped by ghbrett
Scoop.it!

On Being Able to Find Things & Bamboo DiRT

On Being Able to Find Things & Bamboo DiRT | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

"We are still in the midst of a change that is already so familiar that it does not feel momentous—even though, in all likelihood, it is.

 

The availability of information at hand in an instant is now a mundane fact of life. Yet it has immense significance for academics. I can remember when obtaining information necessitated multiple visits to the library, interlibrary loans, photocopying on an epic scale, card indexes, and all of the paraphernalia of search and recall that has now been replaced by a few keystrokes.
...
But what is clear is that it becomes even more incumbent upon academics to be able to interpret and communicate information. Thus, a thorough grounding in what are usually interdisciplinary methods has now become an ever-more-important aspect of academe in both the social sciences and the humanities.
...
In other words, the traditional academic skills of hermeneutics and indeed rhetoric have become important again, just when they might have seemed to be on the wane, as quantitative and qualitative methods intermingle in an environment characterized by a profusion of data." -- from the Source

 

NOTE: This article with it's citation links to supporting materials is a good resource for pointing out technology can lead us to an emerging convergence of academic or synthetic processes rather than specialized or divergent technology & processes. This is a worthwhile read. As an added source I recommend Bamboo Dirt (DiGITAL RESEARCH TOOLS) wiki for a group sourced list of varied applications and resources for multidisciplinary research purposes. You can find it at: http://dirt.projectbamboo.org/

more...
No comment yet.