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'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives

'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

Many emails now being created, and thus potentially archived by libraries, are the contemporary equivalent not of paper letters, but of phone calls - which, with few exceptions, were unrecorded, and really were lost to history. 

 

... In terms of digital literary archives, one of the lessons for today's archivists is that so-called e-manuscripts are highly unstable, and need early curatorial intervention to secure them against the threats of technological obsolescence. This means that the writers involved become increasingly aware of interest in their papers, and for novelist Jonathan Franzen, this changes everything: 'Unfortunately, I think that once writers become self-conscious about preserving archival material, the game is over...I also don't see how you resist the temptation to select material that suggests the most flattering narratives. And not just select, but actively create!' ..." - from the Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

ghbrett's insight:

This post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

 

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ghbrett's curator insight, January 13, 2013 8:13 AM

his post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

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Interview with Francois Ferracci – the director of Lost Memories : One Small Window

Interview with Francois Ferracci – the director of Lost Memories : One Small Window | Education Tech & Tools | Scoop.it

"Lost Memories" c/o vimeo:  http://vimeo.com/49425975

 

"With a running time of less than three minutes the film Lost Memories makes a powerful comment on digital versus analog living as well as the nature of memories—especially when they are all tweeted, blogged or committed to a digital archive somewhere." - from the source

 

NOTE: This should be mandatory reading and viewing for Digital Literacy and for any Digital Media event or course. How fragile is our digital trail of files, images, musice, etc., etc.?

 

Often I wonder what might happen the the terabyte or so of digital images I have as well as the 10+ years of family genealogy (6 Gb) now on 2 hard disks (one as backup). Then I shrug my shoulders thinking it's too much. I do not have a good answer, but I note a revival among some photographers of analog film fotos. I note that genealogy books recommend acid free paper copies and prints of your historical and anecdotal information.

 

What are your thoughts?

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Digital Preservation in a Box | A product of the National Digital Stewardship Alliance

"Welcome to Digital Preservation in a Box. DPB is a product of the National Digital Stewardship Alliance’s Outreach Working Group and is designed as a toolkit to support outreach activities that introduce the basic concepts of preserving digital information. The DPB provides the best available resources and tools to help you communicate digital preservation and stewardship concepts and issues.

 

The materials are geared towards a general audience who routinely create or manage digital information, but who may need a working knowledge of this area for digital preservation on the job or for training others on how to preserve digital resources.

 

The materials can be appropriately used to communicate to professional audiences or to students of all ages." -- from the Source "National Digital Stewardship Alliance"

 

NOTE: My Re-Scoop.it for Digital Curation: A Comprehensive Resource Guide from R. Good's Scoop.it has generated a lot of interest. This is one of the referenced sites in the Guide from the National Digital Stewardship Alliance. I like this resource because as they say it is "geared towards a general audience." But it is applicable for professional audiences as well as "students of all age."

 

Well worth Reading!

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