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Encouraging Your Child's Exploration of the Arts . Music & Arts . Education | PBS Parents

Encouraging Your Child's Exploration of the Arts . Music & Arts . Education | PBS Parents | Dance | Scoop.it
What should you do when your child has expressed interest in dance or theatre? Before you overspend consider these tips for encouraging your child’s exploration of the arts.

Via MAM_Music
MAMDance's insight:

KF: I agree with Erin in terms of this being a potential framework for arts organizations to use when cultivating young arts participants and their first learning experiences.  I especially like the quotation, which Erin also references: "The real point is that a parent’s focus should be on the exploration—or the journey—rather than thinking about the destination— or where this interest might lead."  The arts, including dance, is much more than just the final destination.  I did not pursue professional ballet (hello injuries and lack of amazing dance talent/skill), but years of training definitely affected my life for the better...minus the injuries.  As we all know, skills learned through the arts can be applicable in many different aspects of life. 

 

Sidenote: the picture is really cute!

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MAM_Music's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:03 AM

Institutions can work to foster an appreciation for the arts through giving communities the framework they need to learn and practice. For example, The PBS website offers guidelines for encouraging children's exploration of the arts. They focus on setting guidelines for exploration and creativity, reminding the parents that a journey into the arts does not necessarily end with a career path- or rather, the arts are  an adventure rather than a destination. This is an example of the kind of framework that could be provided by arts organizations to foster an artistic longing within the community. These guidelines and tips, which come as second nature to anyone that has an art background, can make the difference between whether or not a potential newcomer to the arts decides to participate and get involved. Providing a framework to fostering expression and creativity to the arts focuses overwhelmed novices on attainable goals. -Erin

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How can a community based dance company be successful in the 21st century | CultureHive

How can a community based dance company be successful in the 21st century | CultureHive | Dance | Scoop.it
Culture Hive. Discover and share the best practice in cultural marketing
MAMDance's insight:

KF:  I wanted to share this link because I had never heard of CultureHive--a cultural marketing site in the UK.  It has information about a multitude of topics, including case studies (like the Ballet Memphis one in the link), research, and articles.  Definitely a good research tool and it has quite a bit on dance.    

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MAM Presenting's comment, December 8, 2013 12:03 PM
CultureHive is a really interesting website - I came across it researching for my final paper. I also think it highlights some of the merits of having a robust public-funding program for the arts, as the website is monetarily supported by Art Council England. - Marissa
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Doctor and staff keep patients en pointe

Doctor and staff keep patients en pointe | Dance | Scoop.it
In 1983 the leading soloist crumpled to the floor in the midst of a Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre performance at the Benedum Center. As the other dancers continued to swirl in George Balanchine's
MAMDance's insight:
Deb: Just a great little article about dance and medicine from right here in Pittsburgh! It takes more than talent to keep going in this business and it's incredible what a good doctor can do.
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MAM Presenting's comment, December 8, 2013 12:08 PM
Interesting! I think this is an interesting compliment to some of the advertisements in Allison's previous post that focus on the athleticism of dance. I don't think that a lot of people recognize the toll that dance can have on a body (and as a non-dancer, I would not count myself as a person who truly understands it either). - Marissa
MAM Presenting's comment, December 8, 2013 7:39 PM
This article really shows how crucial and critical and good relationship and more so a partnership with a doctor/medical facility can be. Totally agree with Marissa as well that not being a dancer, I had no clue as to the severity of some injuries and the debilitating toll it can have for an individual, company and lifestyle.
MAM Presenting's comment, December 8, 2013 7:39 PM
POST ABOVE BY DAN
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Just ad dance – how adverts got jiggy with it

Just ad dance – how adverts got jiggy with it | Dance | Scoop.it
Judith Mackrell: A new Baileys liqueur ad based on the ballet The Nutcraker is the latest in the industry's current love affair with dance
MAMDance's insight:

(Allison) Not an extremely insightful article on the new popularity of using dance in advertising campaigns, but it pairs nicely with our dicussions of the commercialization of art in our technology driven age as well as Kathleen's post regarding ballet dancers as brands.  At least they're using legit, highly-trained artists!

 

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MAM Presenting's comment, December 1, 2013 7:45 PM
I love the Lexus commercial - the juxta position between the ballet dancer and hip-hop music is wonderful. The highlighting of the ballet dancer's strength is a really interesting departure from the traditional image of a ballerina, most often depicted as delicate and soft. - Marissa
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92nd Street Y Presents an Online Archive of Recordings

92nd Street Y Presents an Online Archive of Recordings | Dance | Scoop.it
The Y is making hundreds of performance recordings available for streaming online, from a 1966 Pablo Neruda reading to an onstage interview with Lou Reed.

Via MAM Theater
MAMDance's insight:

KF: Thanks for sharing Jillian!  I'm not familiar with this organization, but it's exciting that 92nd Street Y is now sharing its archives with the public as opposed to letting them "collect dust."  This project also definitely reminds me of Jacob's Pillow Dance Interactive, which Deb scooped on our page.

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MAM Theater's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:40 PM

An article relating to both theater and other performing art forms --this is quite exciting. The 92nd Street Y, a notable institution for artistic education in the city, is opening some of its archived recordings (dating back to 1949) to the general public.

I love this idea, as it allows audiences to view significant artistic, political, and cultural recordings that they otherwise would never have had a chance to see. But I find it interesting that my response to simulcasts of live performances (online or in a movie theater) is less favorable (not negative, just far less favorable). Upon reflection, I think my difference in opinion stems from the fact that one is promoting work to an audience who is unable to ever see it otherwise, and one is promoting work to an audience who may never see it otherwise. In other words, I will never be able to go and attend a performance from 1950, so watching online is my only option. But watching a simulcast of a production that is currently playing, that I could easily go see, merely means that I haven't decided to visit the theater. I feel that such a distinction is overly critical --after all, if the person watching the online simulcast can't afford the theater ticket, surely it is better to watch online then not watch at all? --and yet, it is still my honest initial reaction. (Jillian)

MAM_Music's comment, November 25, 2013 2:19 PM
Katie: Jillian, I don't think your reaction is overly critical at all. It's an important distinction: sharing performances that are past (and otherwise "collecting dust") versus sharing performances that are present (and as you point out, could potentially be seen in person). The question of copyright is an interesting one, which presumably plays a significant role in both the ability and cost to share either category of performances. By adding 92Y On Demand to its services, the 92nd Street Y seems to be bolstering its mission to be "a world-class nonprofit community and cultural center that connects people at every stage of life to the worlds of education, the arts, health and wellness, and Jewish life." Opening its archives connects people both in its neighborhood and elsewhere to the vibrant activities of its past, and through digital means (potentially) reaches people in stages and circumstances of life that otherwise might not be able to access its performances--past or present. In its significance for accessibility, as well as engagement, 92Y On Demand is an exciting, dynamic initiative. Thanks for sharing!
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PlaybillArts: Features: Project Plié Steps Out at American Ballet Theatre

PlaybillArts: Features: Project Plié Steps Out at American Ballet Theatre | Dance | Scoop.it
Diversity remains a sensitive subject in the world of ballet. Many
major companies have only a handful of dancers of color in their
ranks.
MAMDance's insight:

This is a nice article about an outreach project at American Ballet Theatre called "Project Plie" which focuses on providing training opportunities to students in under-served communities with the goal of increasing the "pool of well-tranined dancers across the racial and ethnic spectrum."  One of the elements I like about this program is that in additional to the outreach portion of the program, ABT is also working to recruit dance teachers with a minority background and train them in the ABT curriculum so as to provide additional role models for those students who are of varying racial backgrounds.  There's also a section about how they've established nationwide partnerships with other ballet companies for the program.  

 

"If professional ballet is going to be relevant in the 21st century, we need to look like America." 

 

-Allison

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MAM Theater's comment, November 30, 2013 9:08 AM
Agreed all around. I'm also really interested in their partnerships across the country - such a wide reach allows them to reach many more minorities than if ABT just partnered with companies in large states, like CA or TX. Diversity is different in every state, and this allows them to show that to the world. (Caroline)
MAM_Music's comment, December 1, 2013 1:20 PM
What a great article and project! I'm glad to see ABT is also adding an arts administration fellowship to bring more diversity to ballet management. I read a post over the summer on AFTA's blog that addresses this issue in arts management today: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/07/22/a-diversity-problem-in-arts-administration-my-reaction-to-the-salary-survey-2013/
MAM_Music's comment, December 1, 2013 1:20 PM
-Kimmy
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Jacob's Pillow Dance Interactive | Jacob's Pillow Dance Interactive

Jacob's Pillow Dance Interactive | Jacob's Pillow Dance Interactive | Dance | Scoop.it
MAMDance's insight:

Deb: As we're talking about digitizing performance art, here is my favorite example. Not only can you get a curated experience, but it's an interactive game, if you want it to be. I think it was smart that they designed options into the format so you can search for something specific, or you can spend an hour procrastinating!

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MAM Theater's comment, November 24, 2013 1:32 PM
What I love about this site is that it draws upon the emerging 'gamification' culture. Their content is meaningful and educational, but it is presented in a way that is engaging and interactive (when this type of material has the potential to be presented in a dry manner). I also applaud the fact that JP has done so well with creating a strong virtual presence for themselves. This is crucial for building an audience base when their location may not be readily accessible. (Jillian)
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Dispatch from Canada: Toronto Symphony Orchestra strikes gold with the kids

Dispatch from Canada: Toronto Symphony Orchestra strikes gold with the kids | Dance | Scoop.it
The Toronto Symphony Orchestra faced near-bankruptcy in 1995 and 2001, a major labor dispute in 1999, half-full halls, crippling debt, and a CEO and conductor who jumped ship, yet it has come out the other side in great shape.

Via MAM_Music
MAMDance's insight:

KF: Thanks Nicole for posting this positive article about arts organizations reaching younger audiences and succeeding.  I wonder what programs like the Toronto Symphony's 18-35 year old $14 "tsoundcheck" program exist in the dance world?  I particulary liked one of the patron's comments: "'It’s the same prices as the movies and it’s more of an outing and it’s cultural.'"  The Symphony took out price from the equation and specifically catered their programs (time and price) to fit with younger audiences, and it worked.

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MAM_Music's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:46 PM

Nicole: Insight coming...

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Autism-Friendly Performances Offer Potential To Bring In New Dance Audiences — FROM THE GREEN ROOM: Dance/USA's e-Journal

Autism-Friendly Performances Offer Potential To Bring In New Dance Audiences — FROM THE GREEN ROOM: Dance/USA's e-Journal | Dance | Scoop.it
MAMDance's insight:

Deb: With autism rates rising, it is great to see this as a headline. Theater companies have made huge strides in the field of autism friendly performances and it is slowly but surely happening in other art forms.

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MAM Presenting's comment, November 17, 2013 10:15 AM
First off, shout out to Jillian who got mentioned in the article!! As for my "comment," having worked with autistic children for a few years, this movement is phenomenal. When the Lion King was in Pittsburgh a little while ago, the training they offered volunteers/ushers was enlightening with regards to the treatment of individuals who fell on the autism-spectrum. The fact that the dialogue on this issue isn't that taboo to talk about any more is a major advancement in the field. No doubt these performances take a lot of effort to bring together and the education alone needed for staff, performers and audiences can be intense, yet this education is the foundation needed for more autistic-friendly performances and support for these performances to take-off. -Dan
MAM Presenting's comment, November 17, 2013 9:24 PM
This is absolutely wonderful ! With so many children on the autism spectrum, these kinds of performances (and staff training) will become ever more important. It will be interesting to see how these organizations transition to serving adults with autism, with regards to both programming and educational and outreach opportunities. - Marissa
MAM Theater's comment, November 18, 2013 10:40 PM
I'm so excited for the work that PBT is doing to provide sensory-friendly performances, and can't wait to help out! To touch upon Marissa's point of the transition to serve adults with autism, I think providing these types of performances to children is to hopefully introduce them to the theatrical environment, with opportunities to feel more welcomed. As the children get older and become adults, it would be amazing to see them transition into regular performances. Otherwise, let's hope these sensory-friendly performances become a norm that any person on the autism spectrum can enjoy. (Seth)
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Choreographer Mark Morris: 'I can be very scary'

Choreographer Mark Morris: 'I can be very scary' | Dance | Scoop.it
He may be nearing 60 but Mark Morris has no time for looking back. The great choreographer is too busy swearing, feuding – and creating dazzling dance. Judith Mackrell sees him in action
MAMDance's insight:

KF:  This articles explores the idea of legacy in the dance world.  How should dance/choreography be remembered?  Or, should it fully concentrate on the present?  Does it fit into a museum setting?  I'm curious how Morris feels about Jacob's Pillow's online archive.  On a side note, I also love Morris' comment about being remembered by being a speed bump. 

 

Also, the article presents Morris' interesting business model.  His company has its own private and public funded structure, while also being a complete community space: Parkinson-related movement classes, child dance classes, and affordable studio rental spaces in NYC.  Seems like a great way to be part of the community, while still creating your own work.

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Ballet Is in Crisis Because It's Turning Into a Sport

Ballet Is in Crisis Because It's Turning Into a Sport | Dance | Scoop.it
The International Olympic Committee recently voted to restore wrestling to the Olympic Games in 2016
MAMDance's insight:

This article provides a bit of insight into how competitive dance events have affected the professional world and the perception of what makes a "great" dancer.  Beyond the decreasing emphasis on the value of artistry that I certainly agree with, I would also argue that the way many of these events are based increasingly on spectacle over quality is completely distorting the viewers' understanding of how an individual progesses to achieve greatness. 

 

-Allison

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MAM Presenting's comment, November 10, 2013 9:57 PM
I agree with Allison's point that too many events like these could distort the viewers' understanding of how an individual progresses to achieve greatness. This phenomenon applies to other arts forms as well, especially in performing arts world, dancing, music, even theatre. I also think that too many competitive events can have a negative impact on artists. Even though audiences are a vital part of performing arts, the goal of art is to share, to communicate but not to please. Arts are not to be scored by techniques. ——Su
MAM Presenting's comment, November 11, 2013 8:55 AM
I think the notion of "dance as a sport" is not a new concept. When I was in middle and high school, our school basically counted dance as a gym class; students could choose either P.E. class or dance class. Ironically, if you chose dance, you could not partake in other arts classes (band, chorus, art), yet those classes did not exclude others from gym/physical education. I do understand how physical education can be taught through dance or gym class; however, I can't help but think that it is this type of categorizing that leads to future notions of "dance as a sport." --Vann
MAM_Music's comment, November 11, 2013 6:43 PM
Katie: Interestingly, here in Pennsylvania, teaching certificates do not exist for dance; therefore to teach dance in a public school setting, an instructor HAS to be a certified physical education teacher. This policy underscores Vann's point that by categorizing dance as athletics, the artistry of the form is diminished. Particularly in light of the various health crises in the United States (obesity, diabetes, etc.), it seems that highlighting dance as an art form--a mode of expressing feeling and storytelling--rather than a sport could well serve those needing movement in their lives when more traditional forms of athletics are less approachable.
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Bolshoi ballet chief maimed in acid attack to testify in Moscow at trial of alleged attackers

Bolshoi ballet chief maimed in acid attack to testify in Moscow at trial of alleged attackers | Dance | Scoop.it
MAMDance's insight:

Deb: I've never really understood why performance art equals pain, tears, and constant degredation? Is it just embedded into the DNA or artists so they expect it? I doubt it! I remember when this happened and the whole world found out that what happens on stage is completely different than what happens off stage. It does make me wonder about outside respect for art when the general public hears about attacks like this, or watch the antics on Dance Moms, and think that the arts aren't worth supporting because it's fully of crazy people. No one deserves to lose their sight because they were mean and negative; but no one deserves to be treated poorly day in and day out and told that this is just how it goes.

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Classical Ballet Meets Reality TV

Classical Ballet Meets Reality TV | Dance | Scoop.it
"City.ballet," developed by Sarah Jessica Parker's production company Pretty Matches and shot by Zero Point Zero, follows several dancers in their professional lives and will have its debut next month on AOL On.
MAMDance's insight:

KF: This article discusses the new AOL online documentary "City.ballet" which will showcase New York City Ballet (NYCB) dancers in the rehearsal room and on stage.  A couple of interesting things:

 

1) Is this a trend in the dance world?  "City.ballet" distances itself from Ballet West's "Breaking Pointe" [a reality show on the CW] by saying that it will only highlight the dance aspect of the company, not the "interpersonal drama."

 

2) Will this be a good way to grow audiences and ticket sales?  "Breaking Pointe" did not necessarily do that for Ballet West, but it will be interesting if this documentary style strengthens NYCB's audience base. 

 

3) Does this tarnish the general ballet mystique?  This question refers to some of the NYCB dancers' misgivings about showcasing the hard work that goes into dance.  Specifically, "Principal dancer Teresa Reichlen said she initially struggled with the larger implications of allowing the audience backstage. 'At the end of the day, you don't want to show the work," she said. 'You want it to look effortless, so it's a weird paradox.'" 

 

4) Finally...this article also mentions unions!  Specifically, union regulations restricted the filming of the dancers performing at Lincoln Center.  The article doesn't mention the specific union, but I assume it has to do with theater personnel/technicians.

 

Ok...sorry to write so much!  Ever since my dance days, I have been an avid follower of shows like these and can't help but be a little excited to see a behind the scenes look at NYCB.

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MAM Theater's curator insight, November 3, 2013 10:00 PM

Ying:

Shooting dancing into a documentary film is a fresh new way of digital marketing for performing arts. I remember the thick stack I collected during my summer internship at Lincoln Center for Audra McDonald's show for Live from Lincoln Center. The performance was premieres on PBS in May, and there was still press coverage coming even in July, which is a good way to show the impact of this new platform. For both dance and theater productions, this form of marketing requires absolute support from performers, company management and the venue, which might pose some difficulty for the shooting party if this involves a union theater or union employees. All parties should sit down and figure out a best way to guarantee mutual gains from this attempt before they go ahead and do it, because the cost involved with TV production could be huge. 

MAM Theater's comment, November 6, 2013 7:50 AM
I was talking to another colleague who watched some of these videos, and noticed that the film 'shots' were very limited - they were repeating a lot of the same footage in different videos. I think, overall, this is a great way to increase online audiences for NYCB. If they keep an honest and open perspective, it will serve them well! (Seth)
Janelle Schank's curator insight, January 13, 11:06 AM

New way of digital marketing for the performing arts -- showing the daily life of a dancer

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U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and National Endowment for the Arts Release Preliminary Report on Impact of Arts and Culture on U.S. Economy | NEA

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and National Endowment for the Arts Release Preliminary Report on Impact of Arts and Culture on U.S. Economy | NEA | Dance | Scoop.it
MAMDance's insight:

Deb: This has nothing to do with dance, but I wanted to make sure that everyone saw this report published this week. This is the first time that a federal study has been conducted to see the impact of the arts and cultural sector on the GDP, and it is glorious! The gross impact was $504 billion, larger than travel and toursim!

Arts and Cultural Production Account for 3.2 Percent -- or $504 Billion -- of Gross Domestic Product in 2011 - See more at: http://arts.gov/news/2013/us-bureau-economic-analysis-and-national-endowment-arts-release-preliminary-report-impact#sthash.NcWYYj4y.dpuf
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MAMDance's comment, December 9, 2013 6:09 PM
KF: I saw this too and am so excited that this type of research is happening/being published!
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The Critical Role of the Strategic Brand : Center for Social Innovation (CSI)

The Critical Role of the Strategic Brand : Center for Social Innovation (CSI) | Dance | Scoop.it

Via MAM Presenting
MAMDance's insight:

KF:  Thanks Vann for posting this article/sound byte.  The branding discussion applies nicely to the article I posted earlier on ballet dancers and brands and how companies are in danger of becoming homogenized.  It will be interesting to follow how ballet company's brands are affected as dancers move around.  What will this mean for their programming and how will a watered down brand affect their organization's identity?  Or, will they find a way to avoid losing their core brand?

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MAM Presenting's curator insight, November 14, 2013 1:24 PM

Don't underestimate the power of the brand! This article features a video speech of Havard researcher who explains that a strong nonprofit brand will create "greater social impact and tighter organizational cohesion." 


I think this is so important for presenting organizations to know and understand. Developing a brand that is uniquing their's and sticking to that will help decision-making when it comes to programing and other management related issues. Having a brand is just as important as having your mission; the two coincide and work with each other to define the organization and promote its values. 


In today's cultural landscape, people look for brands; if something does not have a "brand," chances are it will not last long at all, whether it be food, companies, or clothes. This lecture speaks about how branding is no longer a means to publicize and promote. While branding still plays a big role in marketing, it is becoming more and more important in to the sustainability and cultural identity of nonprofit organizations. 


--Vann

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How to fight HIV through dance

MAMDance's insight:

Deb: What an incredible thing to read on World AIDS Day! "Edutainment" is how many of us learn. Who remembers School House Rock?! Art with a purpose and a passion that is reaching out into a community and literally save lives.

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Ballet Dancers as Brands

Ballet Dancers as Brands | Dance | Scoop.it
Increasingly, star dancers like Natalia Osipova, aware of the brevity of their time in the spotlight, are switching among companies.
MAMDance's insight:

KF:  An article about the growing trend in top-level dancers no longer staying with one company, but rather traveling like opera singers, from one international gig to another and establishing their own brand.  The article also discusses the disparity between opera star and ballet star salaries- why is there such a difference?  Finally, another important note from the articles is how this trend is causing companies to lose their uniqueness.  As one quotation states:

 

"But as star dancers now fly in and out of these companies, and dancers jump ship at earlier ages, the purity and continuity of these styles are becoming harder to maintain, leading to fears of homogeneity."

 

It will be interesting to see whether this trend continues and what it truly means for the ballet world.

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MAM_Music's comment, November 29, 2013 5:08 PM
I'm not as familiar with the ballet world, but I thought it was interesting how the article stated that ballet stars are "becoming more like world-traveling conductors and opera stars." As Kathleen stated, it will be interesting to see what happens in the future and the impacts this new trend has on Ballet Companies in regards to organizational structure or processes -Melody
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Every Dancer Insured: An Affordable Care Act Primer — FROM THE GREEN ROOM: Dance/USA's e-Journal

MAMDance's insight:

Deb: With so much confusion regarding the Affordable Healthcare Act, it's great to see DanceUSA getting actively involved in helping dancers understand how the mandate affects them. It was also nice to see that The Actors Fund has been helping non-Equity menbers understand insurance options for performers since 1998!

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MAM Theater's curator insight, November 25, 2013 4:45 PM

Ying: Though the website of Obama Care has been heavily criticized, poor people do benefit from this new Act. For specific professionals as dancers, I believe, in addition to the health care plan regardless of income levels, some specific programs to prepare them for a role after they suffer from a major injury and have to quit dancing and look for another job is more important in this industry. This will not only provide them with the bottom life they can survive with, but also something they can develop by their own after leaving a industry they are familiar with. It also helps alleviate the burden for their families as well. The traning programs can be conducted throughout their dancing careers, not only after they have to quit it. In this way, if accidents hit, they will have a backup plan instead of being helpless.

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Prosthetic Knowledge Picks: Dance and Technology

A collection of GIFs and videos that document projects that bring together dance and creative technology.
MAMDance's insight:

KF: Some fun links regarding dance and the use of technology.  One particularly interesting example is when a dance troupe used technology that responded to movement from the dancers and the audience.  After discussing The Chalk Line and audience interaction, this seems like such a cool way to interact with the audience, but still in a passive, non-anxiety inducing (for the audience), way.  The specific performance is called "Seventh Sense" and is a collaboration between a Taiwanese dance group (Anarchy Dance Theatre) and Ultra Combo (tech creator).

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MAM Presenting's comment, November 24, 2013 12:46 PM
This combination of dance and technology is really cool! After reading about the bad use of technology in the Met and the Montreal 4D theater play in MAMPresenting scoop, this one seems to have a more appropriate and efficient tech use. I think I have seen that Taiwanese dance group before. I've also seen an asian video game company use this kind of cool dance show in their marketing campaign, impressive one. ——Su
MAM Theater's comment, November 25, 2013 10:16 PM
Wow, Kathleen, I literally have been lost within this article for a good 20 minutes! This is so incredible to see the use of technology in these dance pieces. However, I feel that it completely alters the dance, and focuses on the technology first. So, I can't see this extreme use of technology utilized in all dance performance. But it is so interesting to see! (Seth)
Janelle Schank's curator insight, January 13, 10:41 AM

Combining dance and technology to create magic. Art is art

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Virginia Civil War museums merge

Virginia Civil War museums merge | Dance | Scoop.it
RICHMOND, Va. >> One museum has among its vast Confederate-centric collection Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s sword and the flag that flew at Robert E. Lee’s headquarters.
MAMDance's insight:

This is museums, but since we're talking about mergers, here ya go! I think this merger is a really wise decisions that will help keep the orgnanizatoins viable. It was not a hasty decision and the organizations are similar in scope, so I think nothing but good things will happen. -Deb

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U.S. Dancer Quits the Bolshoi, Complaining of Bribery

U.S. Dancer Quits the Bolshoi, Complaining of Bribery | Dance | Scoop.it
Joy Womack, an American dancer at the prestigious Bolshoi Ballet, says she was told she would have to pay a $10,000 bribe to get a solo role.
MAMDance's insight:

This is just one of many stories that have been released this year regarding corruption and poor management the Bolshoi ballet.  It is truly a shame as they are a staple in the classical ballet world.  I'm certain that there is more to come. 

-Allison

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MAMDance's comment, November 18, 2013 11:03 AM
KF: To add to fuel to the fire...http://gawker.com/meet-the-racketeers-who-control-russian-ballet-applause-1149776119
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Ten Important Lessons in Asking for Charitable Gifts — FROM THE GREEN ROOM: Dance/USA's e-Journal

MAMDance's insight:

Deb: I found this on Dance USA's website. Even though it isn't dance specific, I think everyone at every organization can use a refresher on asking for donations!

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MAM Presenting's comment, November 17, 2013 11:00 AM
This is a great refresher and breakdown of important questions and points to think about when asking for charitable funds. Oftentimes, solicitors can get "so into it" that promises are made or statements exaggerated just to please the potential donor and receive a pledge. It's VERY important NOT to do that. I would add one more bullet point to this list-- when making the ask, know what that potential donor likes and find a way to connect the campaign to him/her. This is crucial and this is why people give money-- the connection.
MAM Presenting's comment, November 17, 2013 9:32 PM
<br><br>I would also add onto that list the power of a simple but personal "Thank You". November 15 is National Philanthropy Day in Canada - and my mom was telling me that on November 15 she received a personalized voicemail message from the Canadian Lung Association simply thanking her for her support. She was incredibly taken aback, and said how wonderful it was to be thanked in such a personal manner even though she is not a major donor. There is no doubt that she will be ever more willing to donate when their next ask comes along. – Marissa
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Questions for the Future of the Arts

Questions for the Future of the Arts | Dance | Scoop.it
Are we witnessing a major transition in the arts from regional organizations to fewer mega-organizations with the sophistication to mount large scale productions, to market them well and to raise large sums of money?

Via MAM Presenting
MAMDance's insight:

KF. An interesting article from Michael Kaiser posted by Marissa.  It's interesting to ponder these questions with a dance lens.  Already, two ballet companies have created reality/documentary tv programs.  Is broadcasting across the country with full performances the next step?  Although, public television and stations like Ovation do broadcast ballets to millions of homes.  If larger dance companies start growing their audience in the national market, will smaller, regional dance companies suffer?  I hope that won't happen, but it's definitely something to ponder. 

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MAM Presenting's curator insight, November 8, 2013 4:53 PM

In this article, Michael Kaiser, President of the Kennedy Center, presents a number of questions about the future of arts organizations in light of the trend to broadcast performances.

 

Kaiser proposes a number of thought-provoking questions. However, I think the most jarring part of this article is that as more major organizations jump on the broadcasting bandwagon – just yesterday the Stratford Shakespeare Festival announced it will be the first North American theatre company to film their productions for worldwide distribution) – even an arts manager who has been dubbed “the Turnaround King” is truly concerned that these broadcasts may have dire consequences for arts organizations and the artistic product across the US.

 

What, then, does this mean for presenting organizations in particular?

 

As this technology advances and becomes cheaper, what motivation will there be arts organizations to tour? Will presenting organizations begin to incorporate movie theatres in their complexes? Or, perhaps, will the movie theatre become the presenter?

 

- Marissa

MAM_Music's curator insight, November 11, 2013 6:18 PM

Katie: Originally posted by Marissa (MAM Presenting) and rescooped by Kathleen (MAM Dance), Michael Kaiser poses a series of provocative questions on the impact that delivering artistic performance via multiple platforms will have on live performance, and particularly on mid-sized (regional) arts organizations. The tone of the piece is rather dire, and it seems, overly so. The fact that multiple arts organizations are utilizing non-standard modes of distribution (simulcasts, etc.) presents just as much opportunity as risk. Yes, a fear exists that people will stop attending live performances, leaving only a handful of "mega-organizations" to deliver content and by consequence allowing a relative few to attend live performances while the majority stream them in. But it also means that artistic performances now have the potential to reach more people than ever before, exposing (in theory) greater portions of the populace to artistic creations that may or may not be familiar via modes that are relevant to them. Taking the long view, this change may just as well increase interest in artistic performance, motivating people to donate and/or attend regional organizations. The future, of course, remains to be seen but can be anticipated with fear or curiousity, as an opportunity that might hurt the arts or that just might help them.

 

Side note: AMTLab contributor Ashley Mac is currently conducting exciting original research on this very topic. You can check it out here: http://amt-lab.org/blog/2013/10/research-update-from-simulcast-audience-to-live-audience

Brett.Ashley.Crawford's comment, November 11, 2013 8:32 PM
preview for this week :-)
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A leaner, 'forward-looking' Dance Theatre of Harlem is back in action

A leaner, 'forward-looking' Dance Theatre of Harlem is back in action | Dance | Scoop.it
NEW YORK — The sign on West 152nd Street, in Harlem's historic Sugar Hill neighborhood, reads "Dance Theatre of Harlem Way" — an appropriate indication of the permanence of the distinctive, dance organization that has struggled and evolved, but...
MAMDance's insight:

KF.  After furloughing 44 dancers in 2004, the Dance Theatre of Harlem has officially bounced back from its troubles.  The article details how the company revived itself--going from 44 member company to a smaller touring company.  The managers are both people who were involved in the artistic side of the company.  The artistic director, who began in 2010, is a former Dance Theatre of Harlem ballerina, and the Executive Director, who began around 2004, is a former dancer, choreographer, and school director.  He also trained at Harvard Business School.  

 

Overall, it's really interesting to gain insight into how the company changed itself and adapted to its current market.  Also, I remember when Dance Theatre of Harlem disappeared from the Kennedy Center ballet season, so it's nice to see that they are touring again.

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MAM_Music's comment, November 11, 2013 12:13 AM
I love that Arthur Mitchell appointed a former DTH dancer, Virginia Johnson, as the new artistic director. It gives light to what kind of culture is within the company, and I think organizations that have such dedicated people also retain committed patrons and friends. I think people respect DTH for having that tight-knit family relationship and are especially proud to have such an organization in their community when it feels like many organizations nowadays struggle with this concept, the riffs between artists and administration.
MAM_Music's comment, November 11, 2013 12:13 AM
-Kimmy
MAM_Music's comment, November 11, 2013 8:11 PM
Katie: I find the rejuvenation of DTH a fascinating and impressive story. By working within its constraints and reimagining its future, DTH was able to reposition itself while still executing artistically meaningful work. I wonder if its story might hold lessons for the classical music industry, particularly as large organizations (especially symphonies and operas) assess how to structure a sustainable and relevant future. How might they downsize but still produce artistically meaningful work--rather than be forced to shut their doors?
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I Don’t Want to Talk about Innovation: A Talk about Innovation | HowlRound

I Don’t Want to Talk about Innovation: A Talk about Innovation | HowlRound | Dance | Scoop.it

Via MAM Theater
MAMDance's insight:

(KF).  A really interesting article posted in the theater group.  Two specific quotations include:

 

"And now we are challenged to add innovation to the list of empty phrases to live by."

 

"Since when is it the job of funders to dictate what every nonprofit should do? What is the Foundation’s “core competency” that entitles them to tell museums, symphonies, dance and theater companies what is essential to fulfilling their separate, varied, and sometimes vital missions?"

 

Do organizations cater too much to what funders will fund?  And, is "innovation" an empty phrase?  The questions raised in the article are definitely applicable to the dance world, and it's interesting to see someone speak out against the buzzwords surrounding the arts world, which are now becoming rather generic.

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MAM Theater's curator insight, November 2, 2013 10:19 AM

Wei: "The article along with the following comments provides an interesting image of how different forces---arts administration, foundation and artists, impact each other. In my view, more than innovation, Todd actually raised a cruel but critical question to the arts industry: who actually has the most powerful saying about art? It is not uncommon now that theaters as well as other kinds of arts organizations set goals of programming partly based on the expectations of foundations. For example, if foundations expect to see education, the organizations may provide more educational shows/programs. It might be true that foundations have somewhat impact on the decision making of mission statement or benchmarks of programming for arts organizations. What I see from this relationship is that artists’ voice drowned in nonprofits’ reliance on unearned revenue. However, when thinking it from the perspective from arts administration, it makes sense that we do programming partly to attract donations so that we can invest more resources into cultural institutions or artists. Also, it is the philanthropic dollars that makes shows cheaper to be accessible to more people. To be honest, I have no idea how to deal with these relationships, but what I learned is that an arts manager should shift more attention on protecting artists’ innovation than catering to foundations’ interests. When most arts organizations have similar missions and programs, it kills art’s innovation in some way. An arts manager needs to be sensitive when setting artistic goals while balancing relationships with artists and foundations. More importantly, I saw a trend of rethinking the scope of foundations. In stead of saying, “you, as a theater should make innovation”, it would be better say “your theatre should allow innovation to happen”. To my knowledge, I believe that both founders and arts managers play a role of serving the community and artists rather than set rules for arts. Let arts happen freely, and cooperate to help art find its community. That’s one way, in my view, of protecting and inspiring innovation…"