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Mitch Dobrowner's Powerful Storm Photography - The Weather Channel

Mitch Dobrowner's Powerful Storm Photography - The Weather Channel | Daily News | Scoop.it
Mitch Dobrowner's Powerful Storm Photography
The Weather Channel
Storms focuses on the phenomenon of storms and on the landscape tradition of the American West.

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How the iPhone 5S stacks up against its biggest competitors

How the iPhone 5S stacks up against its biggest competitors | Daily News | Scoop.it

As always happens, people were already lining up for Apple's newest iteration of its flagship phone even before we had any real idea what they were even in line for. But now that the iPhone 5S is here, speculation is over and we can actually see whether or not all that camping out was worth it. Here's how the 5S stacks up to the smartphone market's top dogs.


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Ria Mehta's curator insight, September 13, 2013 8:37 AM

As always happens, people were already lining up for Apple's newest iteration of its flagship phone even before we had any real idea what they were even in line for.

Jim Bockrath's curator insight, September 13, 2013 10:38 AM

If security is an issue with mobile deployments you should look at the 5s.  

 

 

PortMacOnline's comment, September 13, 2013 9:43 PM
@Jim Brockrath, if security really IS an issue for you, you might want to check out this post before you buy the new iPhone 5S: http://mashable.com/2013/09/11/girl-fingerprint-scanner/
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How To Start Using iTunes U In The Classroom - Edudemic

How To Start Using iTunes U In The Classroom - Edudemic | Daily News | Scoop.it
Ready to take the plunge and start using iTunes U in the classroom? It's not as scary as you think - and many aren't yet using the tool!

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Sarah-Jane Davies's curator insight, September 17, 2013 8:41 AM

Technology is advancing continously; therefore it makes sense for educational systems to keep up with technology. This should be done because its is predominately the youth who enjoy advancing with technology. Therefore if more education systems use iTunesU students will be able to learn their work efficiently since they will understand it more easily than a dull textbook. If institutions adopt this new tool it will make vast changes in both the teacher's and students's education. This tool is very easy to use and is more convenient than compiling numerous notes and books. The only downside is that iTunesU is an Apple product. Therefore only those with iPads,iPhones or any other Apple products will be able to use iTunesU. Apple products are not necessarily cheap; therefore not all institutions would be able to use this new handy tool.

Mary Starry's curator insight, September 17, 2013 10:02 PM

Author has lots of links and resources to assist you in preparing an iTunes U course. 

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:09 AM

Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

Technology is advancing continously; therefore it makes sense for educational systems to keep up with technology. This should be done because its is predominately the youth who enjoy advancing with technology. Therefore if more education systems use iTunesU students will be able to learn their work efficiently since they will understand it more easily than a dull textbook. If institutions adopt this new tool it will make vast changes in both the teacher's and students's education. This tool is very easy to use and is more convenient than compiling numerous notes and books. The only downside is that iTunesU is an Apple product. Therefore only those with iPads,iPhones or any other Apple products will be able to use iTunesU. Apple products are not necessarily cheap; therefore not all institutions would be able to use this new handy tool.

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Nitrogen fixing trees help to quicken the pace of reforestation

Nitrogen fixing trees help to quicken the pace of reforestation | Daily News | Scoop.it

Researchers have discovered that trees can switch on their ability to fix Nitrogen from the atmosphere with a little help from the Rhizobium bacteria. This finding has a huge implication on the ongoing projects of reforestation on denuded lands.

 

A study was carried out on a square mile area of the Panama Canal watershed where the forest was recovering after clearing activities. Different land use options were studied and the carbon storage, runoff and biodiversity were carefully monitored. A comparison was made between mature tropical forests, native trees in forest restoration plots and abandoned pastureland.

 

Jefferson Hall, one of the researchers, said, “This is the first solid case showing how nitrogen fixation by tropical trees directly affects the rate of carbon recovery after agricultural fields are abandoned. Trees turn nitrogen fixation on and off according to the need for nitrogen in the system.”

 

It was observed that trees which were able to fix the atmospheric nitrogen were also able to add carbon nine times quicker than ordinary trees. In fact Nitrogen fixing trees were able to add 50,000 kilograms of carbon per hectare during the first 12 years of growth.

 

Tropical forests act as carbon sinks drawing away carbon from the air. As the scourge of the Global warming increases it is important that freed land which has been denuded by industrial or agricultural use be quickly repaired and reforested. Nitrogen fixing trees will help to quicken the pace of reforestation.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Daily News | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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What direction does Earth's center spin? New insights solve 300-year-old problem

What direction does Earth's center spin? New insights solve 300-year-old problem | Daily News | Scoop.it

Earth's inner core, made up of solid iron, 'superrotates' in an eastward direction -- meaning it spins faster than the rest of the planet -- while the outer core, comprising mainly molten iron, spins westwards at a slower pace.

 

Although Edmund Halley -- who also discovered the famous comet -- showed the westward-drifting motion of Earth's geomagnetic field in 1692, it is the first time that scientists have been able to link the way the inner core spins to the behavior of the outer core. The planet behaves in this way because it is responding to Earth's geomagnetic field.

 

The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, help scientists to interpret the dynamics of the core of Earth, the source of our planet's magnetic field.

 

In the last few decades, seismometers measuring earthquakes travelling through Earth's core have identified an eastwards, or superrotation of the solid inner core, relative to Earth's surface.

 

"The link is simply explained in terms of equal and opposite action," explains Dr Philip Livermore, of the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds. "The magnetic field pushes eastwards on the inner core, causing it to spin faster than Earth, but it also pushes in the opposite direction in the liquid outer core, which creates a westward motion."

 

The solid iron inner core is about the size of the Moon. It is surrounded by the liquid outer core, an iron alloy, whose convection-driven movement generates the geomagnetic field.

 

The fact that Earth's internal magnetic field changes slowly, over a timescale of decades, means that the electromagnetic force responsible for pushing the inner and outer cores will itself change over time. This may explain fluctuations in the predominantly eastwards rotation of the inner core, a phenomenon reported for the last 50 years by Tkalčić et al. in a recent study published in Nature Geoscience.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Jordan Meyer's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:55 PM

We have found out that the inner core of earth roates eastwards. The magentic field pushes eastwards on the inner core, causing it to spin faster than Earth, but it also pushes in the opposite direction in the liquid outer core, which creates westward motion. This is the resoning for many earthquakes and if we can keep ahead in knowledge about how the earth is moving we will have a better idea of when these natural disasters will happen. Hopefully being able to prevent less loss of money for the country. 

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HDMI 2.0: What you need to know

HDMI 2.0: What you need to know | Daily News | Scoop.it
The long-awaited HDMI 2.0 is here, with more 4K support, higher frame rate potential, NO NEW CABLES, and more. Read this article by Geoffrey Morrison on CNET.

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Peter Azzopardi's curator insight, September 16, 2013 6:16 PM

The good news is that it will not be effecting users all that much to quote "Version 2.0 (like 1.4 before it) is entirely a hardware change. It is not a cable change. You can expect cable manufacturers to proclaim that you need expensive new "Version 2.0 cables" but this is untrue. Your current High Speed cables should work just fine."

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'Rivers On Rolaids': How Acid Rain Is Changing Waterways : NPR

'Rivers On Rolaids': How Acid Rain Is Changing Waterways : NPR | Daily News | Scoop.it
The chemistry of dozens of streams and rivers across the U.S. is changing. Waters are becoming more alkaline — the opposite of acidic. And the reason is counterintuitive — researchers believe that acid rain is to blame.

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Marilyn Korhonen's curator insight, September 13, 2013 10:08 AM

Acid rain is largely behind the phenomenon, the scientists say. It's been eating away chunks of rock, especially limestone rock, and the runoff produces carbonates that flow into rivers. "We're basically dissolving the surface of the Earth," says Kaushal. "It's ending up in our water. It's like rivers on Rolaids. There's a natural antacid in these watersheds."

Now that's not an immediate health threat, but it has environmental effects.

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23 Great Sources For Free Educational Videos Online

23 Great Sources For Free Educational Videos Online | Daily News | Scoop.it
Students love to watch and learn. Why not showcase some of the best free educational videos and their repositories then?

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 28, 2013 7:26 AM

Very nice sharing. Thanks

Scott Anderson (Daymap)'s curator insight, December 1, 2013 7:53 PM

Here are some fantastic and free links teachers can use!

Maggie McGuirk Veres's curator insight, September 3, 2014 1:48 PM

It's worth a look.

 

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Jolla devices are now officially Android app compatible

Jolla devices are now officially Android app compatible | Daily News | Scoop.it

Finnish mobile start up company Jolla just sent out a press release stating that "Sailfish OS has achieved a major milestone whereby the OS is now compatible with the AndroidTM ecosystem, in terms of application and hardware compatibility."


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Robin Trance's comment, September 19, 2013 2:02 AM
It is Amazing feature ……
360Logica's comment, September 19, 2013 2:17 PM
amazing!
EARLEENabf's comment, September 20, 2013 3:01 AM
That's great news.
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SUSY2013 Video: Dramatically simplified calculations for particle physics discovered

SUSY2013 Video: Dramatically simplified calculations for particle physics discovered | Daily News | Scoop.it

Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality.

 

“This is completely new and very much simpler than anything that has been done before,” said Andrew Hodges, a mathematical physicist at Oxford University who has been following the work.

 

The revelation that particle interactions, the most basic events in nature, may be consequences of geometry significantly advances a decades-long effort to reformulate quantum field theory, the body of laws describing elementary particles and their interactions. Interactions that were previously calculated with mathematical formulas thousands of terms long can now be described by computing the volume of the corresponding jewel-like “amplituhedron,” which yields an equivalent one-term expression.

 

“The degree of efficiency is mind-boggling,” said Jacob Bourjaily, a theoretical physicist at Harvard University and one of the researchers who developed the new idea. “You can easily do, on paper, computations that were infeasible even with a computer before.”

 

The new geometric version of quantum field theory could also facilitate the search for a theory of quantum gravity that would seamlessly connect the large- and small-scale pictures of the universe. Attempts thus far to incorporate gravity into the laws of physics at the quantum scale have run up against nonsensical infinities and deep paradoxes. The amplituhedron, or a similar geometric object, could help by removing two deeply rooted principles of physics: locality and unitarity.

 

“Both are hard-wired in the usual way we think about things,” said Nima Arkani-Hamed, a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., and the lead author of the new work, which he is presenting in talks and in a forthcoming paper. “Both are suspect.”

 

Further reading: http://tinyurl.com/of7ozgg

 

The original PPT presentation from Dr. Trnka is here:

http://tinyurl.com/n7mgvxl


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Alain Coetmeur's comment, September 19, 2013 4:14 AM
it remind me the work of Feynman, who find a different way to express the same reality. It is not a change of theory, but many a paradigm extension (not a change in fact). It may open new doors, and force physicist to change they way to work... It seems to beautiful that I expect it to be embraced quickly.
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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | Daily News | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

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How and where imagination occurs in the human brain

How and where imagination occurs in the human brain | Daily News | Scoop.it
Philosophers and scientists have long puzzled over where human imagination comes from. In other words, what makes humans able to create art, invent tools, think scientifically and perform other incredibly diverse behaviors?

 

The answer, Dartmouth researchers conclude in a new study, lies in a widespread neural network -- the brain's "mental workspace" -- that consciously manipulates images, symbols, ideas and theories and gives humans the laser-like mental focus needed to solve complex problems and come up with new ideas.

 

Their findings, titled "Network structure and dynamics of the mental workspace," appear the week of Sept. 16, 2013, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

 

"Our findings move us closer to understanding how the organization of our brains sets us apart from other species and provides such a rich internal playground for us to think freely and creatively," says lead author Alex Schlegel , a graduate student in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. "Understanding these differences will give us insight into where human creativity comes from and possibly allow us to recreate those same creative processes in machines."

 

Scholars theorize that human imagination requires a widespread neural network in the brain, but evidence for such a "mental workspace" has been difficult to produce with techniques that mainly study brain activity in isolation. Dartmouth researchers addressed the issue by asking: How does the brain allow us to manipulate mental imagery? For instance, imagining a bumblebee with the head of a bull, a seemingly effortless task but one that requires the brain to construct a totally new image and make it appear in our mind's eye.


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Megan Kopke's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:11 PM

our brain could be controlling images and symbols to produce "imagination" rather than something more arbitrary... we make vague contructs of images described to us that may not exsist outside of our imagination.  people with greater imaginations can form more symbols and images, or combine them more easily? 

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Free copy of Invent to Learn for educators

Free copy of Invent to Learn for educators | Daily News | Scoop.it

"For a limited time, the Kindle (e-book) version of Invent to Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom http://amzn.to/1529LDo ; is FREE!

Read the book leading technology journalist Larry Magid called "the bible of the Maker Movement in schools".

From Wednesday, September 18 through Friday, September 20, 2013 the Kindle version of Invent to Learn will be free. (Start and end times are approximately midnight Pacific time.)

Don't delay, don't miss out! Three days only!"


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Diane Therrien's comment, September 21, 2013 9:43 AM
Thank you John for starting the communication on this one...:-)
Diane Therrien's comment, September 21, 2013 9:43 AM
Thank you John for starting the communication on this one...:-)
María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, September 23, 2013 7:25 AM
Amazing¡¡¡
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Create Amazing Interactive Presentations From Your Browser With Emaze

Create Amazing Interactive Presentations From Your Browser With Emaze | Daily News | Scoop.it
Browser based presentation platforms are quickly gaining ground as HTML5 has made it possible to create robust presentations online without the need for applications like PowerPoint or Keynote.

Via Baiba Svenca, Jim Lerman, Dennis T OConnor
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Abe Soltani's curator insight, October 12, 2013 11:55 PM

Like it.

Maite Gonzalez's curator insight, October 18, 2013 9:30 AM

add your insight...

 

 

 

Fiona Harvey's curator insight, February 3, 2014 10:39 AM

Looks relaly cool - will have use for this combined with other apps to generate presentations. 

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iOS 7 Quick Guide: 5 must-know iOS 7 features

iOS 7 Quick Guide: 5 must-know iOS 7 features | Daily News | Scoop.it

"iOS 7 represents the latest iteration of Apple's mobile device operating system and a sea change in the way that the company's customers interact with their smartphones and tablets. No more do skeuomorphic user interface elements clutter the screen; Apple designers know that after six years of iOS, customers have pretty much figured out how to use the devices."


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Games prove to be winning fitness motivators

Games prove to be winning fitness motivators | Daily News | Scoop.it

After years of failed attempts at self-motivation, it was an app that finally got Sally Albert out of bed and exercising every morning.

 

An Android app, designed as part of a Stanford study, ultimately delivered her the necessary kick in the rear.


Via Josué Cardona
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EARLEENabf's comment, September 26, 2013 12:17 AM
Yeah science and technology always helps human life's run
robyns tut's curator insight, October 5, 2013 1:08 PM

This is a great way to promote fitness. You may not know who your behaviour or energy level is perceived by others, but now your bird icon will show you. Very smart way to get people conscious of their health and exercise routine.

robyns tut's comment, October 5, 2013 1:08 PM
- sara
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The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island

The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island | Daily News | Scoop.it

"When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’, just off the coast of the island nation of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean."


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 26, 2013 11:19 AM

this look pretty nice i would like to go see it in person

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:36 PM

By looking at this picture you automatically think its a waterfall within the water. This image is actually just showing the mix of sand and silt deposits mixing together. The light to dark colors is what makes it look like a waterfall. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:24 PM

Another spectacular sight. Of course, you will need a plane or helicopter to venture above it to see it, but this illusion is pretty nifty.

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Google Analytics To Cease IE8 Compatibility By End Of 2013

Google Analytics To Cease IE8 Compatibility By End Of 2013 | Daily News | Scoop.it
Google Analytics announced today that it will not be compatible with Microsoft Internet Explorer 8 by the end of this year.

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playapk's comment, September 20, 2013 11:51 AM
best view browser for analytics are Firefox & Chrome only
Richard Platt's comment, September 20, 2013 5:37 PM
Why should they IE sucks
Olivia Grey's curator insight, September 21, 2013 3:03 AM

Thats great news, IE8 is one of the most used web browser. Google Analytics on IE is a great help.

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The Authoritative Map


Via Seth Dixon
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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:26 PM

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map.

 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable? 

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, November 28, 2013 1:04 AM

The user is putting total trust in the map to get from A to B. How can we trust the map? What are the features of good infromation? A useful discussion-starter.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:38 AM

I think this video is a perfect example of todays modern soceity. Many people in this would today are exactly like rabbit, they believe everything they see without questioning its integrity. this has cause alot of problems in todays internet fueled world with anyone being able to post whatever they want and call it fact. This is where we need more people like Pooh who question everything. Pooh sees where he wants to go with his own eyes and can tell that rabbit is leading him the wrong way. This is relateable to so much in geography but to keep it simple ill compare it to Pythagoras proclaimed the earth was spherical. He question something everyone in the world took as a fact and nobody believed him because it was already stated that the world was flat. Just like pooh questioning the "offical map"

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Ben Affleck unfazed by Batman criticsm - Movie Balla

Ben Affleck unfazed by Batman criticsm - Movie Balla | Daily News | Scoop.it

The 'Argo' filmmaker has developed a thick skin over time due to countless snubs from film critics, so claims to have taken the uproar over his casting as the caped crusader in Zack Snyder's 'Man of Steel' sequel on the chin.


Via Jeanne Price
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