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Daily Geography
Newsworthy geography related articles perfect for classroom use.
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Are There Any Innovations Left in Golf? Maybe This One.

Are There Any Innovations Left in Golf? Maybe This One. | Daily Geography | Scoop.it

Two entrepreneurs spent years trying to get their high-tech golf ball approved for play. Now that they've succeeded, the really hard part begins. How does a tiny startup in Buffalo, New York break into the multibillion-dollar golf equipment industry?


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Gun ownership around the world: Graphic | Graphics | News | National Post

Gun ownership around the world: Graphic | Graphics | News | National Post | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
The Post takes a look at gun ownership around the world compared with the rate of firearms-related deaths
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How Europe’s Bottom 10 Economies are Hoding Up: Graphic | Graphics | News | National Post

How Europe’s Bottom 10 Economies are Hoding Up: Graphic | Graphics | News | National Post | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
The leader-of-a-small-eurozone-country-mantra: “We are NOT Cyprus. We have never been Cyprus. Will will not be Cyprus. Our reliance on banking is a totally different sort of cash grab altogether.
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A Life Revealed - National Geographic Magazine

A Life Revealed - National Geographic Magazine | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.
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Singapore’s 'National Night' Encourages Citizens to Make Babies

Singapore’s 'National Night' Encourages Citizens to Make Babies | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
Singapore's unbelievably low birthrates have inspired National Night, a campaign to encourage Singaporean couples to let their patriotism explode on August 9.

 

Not all countries are concerned about overpopulation; Singapore's National Night was an innovative campaign to boost fertility rates (warning: the video is a touch provocative). 


Via Seth Dixon, KochAPGeography
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 2014 2:22 PM

Not all countries are concerned about overpopulation;  Countries like Japan are in steep decline in terms of their population.   Singapore's National Night was an innovative campaign to boost fertility rates (warning: the video is a touch provocative).  Denmark is another country that is seeking to to encourage higher fertility rates with another salacious ad.


Tag: declining populations.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 15, 2014 10:13 AM

Unit 2

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2015 3:11 PM

This is very interesting. Singapore has inspired a campaign called "National Night" has encouraged couples to "let their patriotism explode" and have children. Singapore's population is quickly decreasing due to their low birthrates. They want to encourage parents to feel like it is their civic duty to bring kids into this world. The government is pushing for a more parent-friendly environment that includes longer maternity and paternity leaves and larger housing for growing families. Usually the majority of these countries have the opposite problem with an overbearing population so it's refreshing to see a different side of it. This video is definitely trying to target a certain audience by trying to boost their fertility rates.

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Asians Surpass Hispanics as Biggest Immigrant Wave

Asians Surpass Hispanics as Biggest Immigrant Wave | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
Asian immigrants have pushed the United States’ population of Asian descent to a record 18.2 million and helped make Asians the country’s fastest-growing racial group, a study says.
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How Containerization Shaped the Modern World - Sir Harold Evans

View the full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-containerization-shaped-the-modern-world Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across ...

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School, English Gallery, Scarpaci Human Geography
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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | Daily Geography | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 2014 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:01 AM

It is incredible big, but unfortunately most of the north area is cover by the big Sahara and most of the are is typically unfertilized. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 4:29 PM

As we can see, there's a little overlapping here and some empty spots but it's pretty accurate. The United States and China are in the top 5 largest countries of the world list and they still fit in the 2nd largest continent of the world, Africa. I'd like to see the size comparison between Africa and Russia. I did some research on that and it turns out that Russia is a little over half the size of Africa, maybe the size of the combination of the United States and China.

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Global Closet Calculator

Global Closet Calculator | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
Interactive. The Global Closet Calculator aggregates the contents of your own closet by origin to generate a map showing your unique global footprint, and puts you in charge of the global journey your stuff takes to get to you.
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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

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Thematic

Thematic | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
This division of resources was designed to roughly follow the AP Human Geography Course Outline.  Obviously there will be some overlap and a few gaps, but I hope that the resources can be of use to...

Via dilaycock
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Seth Dixon's comment, July 31, 2012 10:44 AM
You scooped my site before I even go around to it! Now that is on the ball!
dilaycock's comment, July 31, 2012 5:56 PM
This is such a great resource Seth. Thanks so much for it, and all your other great stuff @APHumanGeography
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Mapping Mexico's gang violence

Mapping Mexico's gang violence | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
Voters are counting on the next president to find a solution to the country's alarming rise in organised crime.

 

This interactive features shows temporal and spatial data on drug-related deaths in Mexico since 2007.  Also connected are profiles of the presidential candidates of the three major political parties (PRI, PAN and PRD) and with their platform on drugs and ways to curtail the accompanying violence.  Mexico's presidents can only hold office for one term, but it is a six-year term...2012 isn't just about Obama and Romney. 


Via Seth Dixon
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James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:46 PM

(Mexico topic 7)

A picture (specifically a map, in this case) is absolutely worth a thousand words, and can invoke many more. Over 10,000 deaths in Chihuahua but less than 20 in Baja California Sur, for example - though Chihuahua's population is greater, the percentages based upon population are still way out of proportions. For some perspective, If Rhode Island were in Chihuahua's situation, that would mean over 3000 cartel-related deaths every year in the state (~0.3% of the total population).

Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 2015 3:35 PM

I just finished reading a scoop about violence in Mexico getting worse and I discovered that violence in Mexico comes from its poor economy, drugs and dead-end lives. Chihuahua, the largest state in Mexico has the most number of violent deaths in Mexico with over 10,000 deaths. The smallest state in Mexico, Tlaxcala has only 13 deaths due to gang violence. YOu would think that the size matters in the number of deaths due to gang violence but that is not the case. Sinaloa is smaller than Sonora and Sinaloa's death rate due to gang violence is four times higher than Sonora's. Also, Baja California Sur is slightly smaller than Baja California Norte is Baja California Norte's death rate due to gang violence is 105 times higher than Baja California Sur's death rate.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 5:56 PM

After reading this article and playing along with the interactive map, which I think is a very well used resource, I can see that gang violence is a major issue in the country of Mexico, especially as stated in the article, areas near US borders and places with ports. For example, a place near a US border is Chihuahua with 10,134 deaths! In Chihuahua located at Ciudad Juarez, near El Paso is where the conflict between two cartels is focused. It is also scary to know that there is that much violence going on right next to our own territory. 

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The Hair-Trigger Military Balance on the Korean Peninsula | Graphics | News | National Post

The Hair-Trigger Military Balance on the Korean Peninsula | Graphics | News | National Post | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
Tensions in the Korean Peninsula have soared with a series of provocations from North Korea as well as a revelation in a U.S.
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How Europe’s Top 10 Economies are Holding Up: Graphic | Graphics | News | National Post

How Europe’s Top 10 Economies are Holding Up: Graphic | Graphics | News | National Post | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
The outbreak of the crisis in Cyprus this week is putting renewed focus on the economic health of Europe. So far, only smaller European economies, such as Greece and Ireland, have needed bailouts to prevent a collapse.
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Saudia Arabia To Build Women-Only City

Saudia Arabia To Build Women-Only City | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
In a bid to reconcile strict gender-segregation laws with a desire to increase employment opportunities for women, Saudi Arabia is planning to construct a new industrial "city" exclusively for female workers, Russian news agency RT reports.

 

The idea is mind-blowing to say the least.  More women would be able to be a part of the workforce and move freely about women-only cities in Saudi Arabia than they could in 'regular' cities. 

Question to ponder: would the implementation of this idea represent a cultural step forward for Saudi Arabia towards gender equality or would it be a step that further isolated women and is repressive?  What do you think of the idea given the ingrained gender norms of Saudi Arabia? 


Via Seth Dixon, KochAPGeography
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Kendra King's curator insight, February 27, 2015 1:09 AM

I can see how this might sound appealing, but this isn't the right solution. On the one hand, the women would be able to enter the work force more so as to close the disparity between women who are unemployed. That gap is actually huge since the article mentioned the number of Saudi women who work is somewhere in the low teens despite the fact that "60%" of college graduates are women. At the same time, this environment might prove to be more freeing for women in regards to their movement as well. As the article mentioned women always have to be "accompanied by a male," which is just ridiculously restricting.

 

Yet all of these benefits come at the price of isolation. That whole "separate, but equal" thing played out in the US and it wasn't actually equality. Nor did it actually make for a harmonious environment. In order to actually change people's minds, the government can't just push the women workers out of site in a corner.Without men being around women workers, they will continue to treat them poorly as second class citizens. Furthermore,separating them almost makes it seem like they are second class thereby exacerbating the gender norms within the country even more. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:49 AM

This women only city policy, has a lot in common with the racial segregation polices in the United States. In 1896, in Plessy v Ferguson the Supreme Court ruled that as long as the facilities for whites and blacks were equal, segregation was constitutionally permissible. The idea that facilities can be separate and equal is a fallacy. The dominate group will always be provided with the better facilities , because they have the economic and the social means to build a better facility. The less group will suffer do to a lack of political and economic means. This women only city will likely pale in comparison to the other cities of Saudi Arabia. True equality comes through integration, not separation.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:20 PM

this would 100% be a step back, that is the worst kind of segregation and "equality" did we not have this in the united states and it was scrapped shortly after because "separate is inherently not equal"

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Folk Customs From Around the World

Folk Customs From Around the World | Daily Geography | Scoop.it

Via Jane Ellingson, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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The New World

The New World | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 24, 2015 8:53 AM

This article is probably one of my favorites I have read so far. It describes perfectly the political instability still present in the world, and that the globe and its boundaries are constantly changing, never staying put for too long. It surprised me at the new borders which most likely are going to happen, such as the unification of parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Also, the fact that South Korea is subtly getting ready for the reunification of North and South Korea. Also, there may be devolution in Mali and splintering devolution in the Congo's.

This shows devolution as the power in these nations in which are breaking up, such as Belgium and the Flemish peoples. It shows the centrifugal forces behind the breakup of nations, such as ethnicities which vary, or the centripetal forces which bring nations together such as the combination of South and North Korea. 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:12 AM

Devolution/Fragmentation

 

This article is about nations that could become potentially independent in the near Future, whether due to chronic ethnic incoherence, redrawn governemnt policies, or a growing stateless nation group. Some examples given are an independent Khurdistan, a larger Azerbaijan, and the split of Belgium. 

 

Centrifugal forces are the root of conflict in many countries. These forces include ethnic variety, lack of common language, political instability. These are what may be causing a split in both Belgium (developed country) and Somalia (developing country). There may also be a unification of countries—the map gives an example of the Saudia Arabia, Oman, Yemen, Bahrain, and other melding into one Arabian Gulf Union, of China absorbing Siberia. This does not necessarily herald the presence of centripetal forces, as these countries may be the result of military conquest. 

 

 

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How The USA Expanded (In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF)

How The USA Expanded (In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF) | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
Got 30 seconds and want to see exactly how the country now known as the U.S. expanded across the continent? Ever wish you could see all that in one simple animated GIF? Me neither. Until I saw this.
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Twenty more Niles needed to feed growing population-leaders

OSLO (Reuters) - The world needs to find the equivalent of the flow of 20 Nile rivers by 2025 to grow enough food to feed a rising population and help avoid conflicts over water scarcity, a group of former...
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Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | Daily Geography | Scoop.it
As upscale, high-rise condos and hipster bars opened nearby, longtime customers joked: Is this really still “the ’hood”? Not anymore.

 

In a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington D.C. that was historically African-American, Fish in the ’Hood was an iconic restaurant that captured the feel of the area.  Just this May, the storefront restaurant was renamed Fish in the Neighborhood.

Questions to Ponder: Why?  Does it matter?  What does it mean?


Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 25, 2014 5:35 PM

Gentrification deals with the forcing out of lower income residents and making space available for the more affluent. The re-naming of Fish in the 'Hood shows how gentrification forces the culture  of entire communities to change. Although this restaurant was popular before, they were forced to re-brand so they can stay in business. Gentrification exiles the poor, with that their culture. This restaurant shows that, as more upscale business open up to service the needs of more affluent citizens, any business that has the perception of being the contrary will soon be out of business. This matters because it shows how gentrification destroys communities image, and culture for the sake of increasing revenue and real estate value. What is exhibit here is not only a socio-economic shift but also a racial shift as well. This neighborhood was predominately African American before it began to gentrify, "The 'Hood" is a saying that correlates with African American culture. This restaurant's re-branding shows that they no longer can continue to bring in customers with a name that is part of the African American vernacular. Furthermore, it shows the racial trends that go with gentrification where minority culture is pushed out as more money flows in.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:15 AM

The article talks about a restaurant called Fish In The NeighborHood, with emphasis on Hood, that has not been affected by the gentrification that has happened in the area. He still refers to the area as "Hood" even with all the newly built building. The article also describes the process of the gentrification, and people's opinions on the name of the restaurant compared to the area.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it explains the idea and process of gentrification. It gives an example of how some buildings are unaffected by the gentrified area. 

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:50 AM

this article is taking the time to plainly spell out what gentrification is and where it is happening. Gentrification means the taking of lowe class land and making it more valuable to try and boost the overall way of life in that area. Most people are blind to this system and should take the time to learn about it. 

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What is Geo-literacy?

Geo-literacy extends far beyond knowing where places are on a map.  National Geographic Education has put an emphasis on geoliteracy, which entails spatial thinking skills and understanding systems in addition to content knowledge about locations and places. 


Via Seth Dixon, Mr. David Burton, Matthew Wahl
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Adam Lenaarts's curator insight, September 30, 2013 6:33 PM

Geo literacy explained to all people that don't know I Teacher Much more than just places...

Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2013 10:32 AM

Geo-literacy extends far beyond knowing where places are on a map.  National Geographic Education has put an emphasis on geo-literacy, which entails spatial thinking skills and understanding systems in addition to content knowledge about locations and places.

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:09 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concepts of geo-literacy and spatial perspective because it indicates that for a population to be knowledgeable about geography, it must go above the mere rote memorization of toponyms and instead explore the spatial characteristics of places.

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Using a Smartphone and ArcGIS Online

Using a Smartphone and ArcGIS Online | Daily Geography | Scoop.it

"Now that it is easy to gather tracks and waypoints on a smartphone and map them in a GIS, it provides a good opportunity to remind students about the importance of being critical of and paying attention to data. I recently went on a walk around a local reservoir and used the Motion X GPS app on my iPhone to collect my track and a few waypoints. I emailed the data to myself and added the GPX file to ArcGIS Online so I could map and examine the track. I made my results public and made it visible below to feature some teachable moments......"

 

What a perfect combination!  Students more and more have these fantastic computing devices that we often underutilize (or ban outright) in their education.  This article shows how to bring GIS and a student's smartphone together.


Via Seth Dixon
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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 1:20 PM
Mapping and examining your tracks of direction on the move, you can't get any more "real time" than that! And I have been witness to a change in school settings, in regards to cell phone use in school. I can remember before students had advanced cell phones, and cell phones were not allowed to be seen out of one’s pocket in a classroom. But now I am seeing cell phones being an advantage to classroom studies.