Daguerreotype
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Daguerreotype
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The Very First Military Photos - Mexican-American War 1846-1848

The Very First Military Photos - Mexican-American War 1846-1848 | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it
The first war to be photographed was the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848.

There are very few photos of the war, due to the technology of the time being based on glass-plated daguerrotypes.
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Photoshop Contests, Win Real Prizes, Photoshop Tutorials, Photoshop Forums

Photoshop Contests, Win Real Prizes, Photoshop Tutorials, Photoshop Forums | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it
Photoshop contest entry Civil War Daguerreotype.
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Louis Daguerre: Pictures Illuminate Google's Man of the Day

Louis Daguerre: Pictures Illuminate Google's Man of the Day | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it

Happy Birthday Louis!

Born November 18, 1787 Louis Daguerre (complete name Louis-Jacques-Mande Daguerre) partnered with contemporary and French printer Joseph Nicephore Niepce -- the actual inventor of a permamnent photograph, also called a heliograph -- in 1825 to help catalyse a process that speeded up creation of dioramas -- a picture viewing device.

While Niepce is credited with successfully inventing the first permanent photograph, Louis Daguerre made the entire process commercially viable.

Daguerre's efforts, in a way, is the harbinger of the age of digital photography and its explosion that we are witnessing today in the 21st century.


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Decayed Daguerreotypes | The Public Domain Review

Decayed Daguerreotypes | The Public Domain Review | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it
A selection of images from the Library of Congress found via the always excellent Ptak Science Books blog. The daguerreotype, invented by Louis-Jacques...

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Patrick Bailly-Maître-Grand: "Daguerreotypes"

Patrick Bailly-Maître-Grand: "Daguerreotypes" | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it

Patrick Bailly-Maître-Grand: "Daguerreotypes", 1983-87

 

http://www.baillymaitregrand.com/


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La dégradation des daguerréotypes

La dégradation des daguerréotypes | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it
Lire la suite de La dégradation des daguerréotypes
Une petite collection de daguerréotypes
Des types de bulles
6 gars sous une explosion nucléaire
Micro Robots Magnétiques

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7 Things We Learned About the World Thanks to Photography

7 Things We Learned About the World Thanks to Photography | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it
Photography and science have gone hand in hand since Louis Daguerre used his fossil collection as the subject of one of his first daguerreotypes.

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This date in science: Daguerreotype photography made public

This date in science: Daguerreotype photography made public | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it
On January 9, 1839, the French Academy of Sciences announced Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre's daguerreotype photography process to the world.

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Jonathan Rattray Clark's curator insight, January 29, 2013 3:34 PM

what an exciting time this must have been living on the edge of imagination

 

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1853 Daguerreotype - What did you first notice about this image?

What does an 1853 daguerreotype have to say? Plenty, says Frank Goodyear. He examines a photograph taken at Niagara Falls and shows how, with a little analys...
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Great Civil War Images for Sale

Great Civil War Images for Sale | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it
Dave Taylor's Civil War Antiques buys sells appraises authentic Union and Confederate Civil War antiques. Guns, swords, uniforms, drums, flags, medals, letters, diary, etc.
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Louis Daguerre and Daguerreotype

Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre (18 November 1787 – 10 July 1851) was a French artist and physicist, recognized for his invention of the daguerreotype process of photography. He became known as one of the fathers of photography. Though he is most famous for his contributions to photography, he was also an accomplished painter and a developer of the diorama theatre.

Daguerre was born in Cormeilles-en-Parisis, Val-d'Oise, France. He apprenticed in architecture, theatre design, and panoramic painting with Pierre Prévost, the first French panorama painter. Exceedingly adept at his skill of theatrical illusion, he became a celebrated designer for the theatre and later came to invent the Diorama, which opened in Paris in July 1822.

In 1829, Daguerre partnered with Nicéphore Niépce, an inventor who had produced the world's first heliograph in 1822 and the first permanent camera photograph four years later.[1][2] Niépce died suddenly in 1833, but Daguerre continued experimenting and evolved the process which would subsequently be known as the Daguerreotype. It has recently been discovered that Daguerre may have misled Niepce's son about the value of the invention in order to better claim any profits from it individually. After efforts to interest private investors proved fruitless, Daguerre went public with his invention in 1839. At a meeting of the French Academy of Sciences on 7 January of that year, the invention was announced and described in general terms, but all specific details were withheld. Under assurances of strict confidentiality, Daguerre explained and demonstrated the process only to the Academy's perpetual secretary François Arago, who proved to be an invaluable advocate. Members of the Academy and other select individuals were allowed to examine specimens at Daguerre's studio. The images were enthusiastically praised as nearly miraculous and news of the Daguerreotype quickly spread. Arrangements were made for Daguerre's rights to be acquired by the French Government in exchange for lifetime pensions for himself and Niépce's son Isidore; then, on 19 August 1839, the French Government presented the invention as a gift from France "free to the world" and complete working instructions were published.

"In 1826, prior to his association with Daguerre, Niépce used a coating of bitumen to make the first permanent camera photograph. The bitumen was hardened where it was exposed to light and the unhardened portion was then removed with a solvent. A camera exposure lasting for hours or days was required. Niépce and Daguerre later refined this process, but unacceptably long exposures were still needed.

 

After the death of Niépce in 1833, Daguerre concentrated his attention on the light-sensitive properties of silver salts, which had previously been demonstrated by Johann Heinrich Schultz and others. For the process which was eventually named the Daguerreotype, he exposed a thin silver-plated copper sheet to the vapor given off by iodine crystals, producing a coating of light-sensitive silver iodide on the surface. The plate was then exposed in the camera. Initially, this process, too, required a very long exposure to produce a distinct image, but Daguerre made the crucial discovery that an invisibly faint "latent" image created by a much shorter exposure could be chemically "developed" into a visible image. The latent image on a Daguerreotype plate was developed by subjecting it to the vapor given off by mercury heated to 75° Celsius. The resulting visible image was then "fixed" (made insensitive to further exposure to light) by removing the unaffected silver iodide with concentrated and heated salt water. Later, a solution of the more effective "hypo" (hyposulphite of soda, now known assodium thiosulfate) was used instead.[3]

 

The resultant plate produced an exact reproduction of the scene. The image was laterally reversed -- as images in mirrors are -- unless a mirror or inverting prism was used during exposure to flip the image. To be seen optimally, the image had to be lit at a certain angle and viewed so that the smooth parts of its mirror-like surface, which represented the darkest parts of the image, reflected something dark or dimly lit. The surface was subject to tarnishing by prolonged exposure to the air and was so soft that it could be marred by the slightest friction, so a Daguerreotype was almost always sealed under glass before being framed (as was commonly done in France) or mounted in a small folding case (as was normal in the UK and US)."

 

Wikipedia Disclaimer: "This article includes a list of references, but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. Please help toimprove this article by introducing more precise citations. (August 2011)"

 

 


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Daguerreotype - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Daguerreotype - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it
Definition of daguerreotype from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary with audio pronunciations, thesaurus, Word of the Day, and word games.

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The Genius of Photography

The Genius of Photography | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it

In the course of our 170 year relationship, photography has delighted us, served us, moved us, outraged us and occasionally disappointed us.
But mainly, it has intrigued us by showing the secret strangeness that lies beneath the world of appearances. And that is photography’s true genius.
Follow the story of photography in BBC Four’s six-part series The Genius of Photography. See some of the most famous photographs ever taken and find out more about what made them so very special.
The series explores every aspect of photography from daguerreotype to digital, portraits to photo- journalism and art to advertising, and includes interviews and encounters with some of the world’s greatest living photographers including William Eggleston, Nan Goldin, William Klein, Martin Parr, Sally Mann, Robert Adams, Juergen Teller, Andreas Gursky, Jeff Wall and many others.
Episodes are: Fixing the Shadows, Documents for Artists, Right Place, Right Time?, Paper Movies, We Are Family and Snap Judgements.

Watch the full documentary now (playlist – 5 hours)


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Google Doodle Celebrates French Physicist Louis Daguerre

Google Doodle Celebrates French Physicist Louis Daguerre | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it

Today's Doodle on Google's homepage is a tribute to Louis Daguerre, French physicist who's credited with inventing daguerreotype.


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Creating a Daguerreotype Plate Using the Becquerel Method, From Start to Finish

Creating a Daguerreotype Plate Using the Becquerel Method, From Start to Finish | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it

In daguerreotype photography, the first commercially successful photographic process, a positive image is recorded directly onto a silvered copper plate. Although mercury is traditionally used to develop the plate, there’s a way of creating daguerreotypes called the Becquerel method that eschews mercury in favor of non-lethal ingredients. According to Contemporary Daguerreotypes,.


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Photographs Look Even Better With 200 Years of Decay

Photographs Look Even Better With 200 Years of Decay | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it
The Library of Congress is brimming with flawless daguerreotype photographs that give us a pristine look into the state of things over the past two centuries.

Via ECAL Library
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Decayed Daguerreotypes | The Public Domain Review

Decayed Daguerreotypes | The Public Domain Review | Daguerreotype | Scoop.it
A selection of images from the Library of Congress found via the always excellent Ptak Science Books blog. The daguerreotype, invented by Louis-Jacques...

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markusmunch's curator insight, January 9, 2013 12:09 PM

Seem to be developing slight fetish for dirty old pics