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Lockheed Martin wins Apache M-TADS/PNVS contract - News - Shephard

Lockheed Martin wins Apache M-TADS/PNVS contract - News - Shephard | D-FENS | Scoop.it

Lockheed Martin has announced that it has received a Performance Based Logistics (PBL) contract from the US Army for sustainment of the Modernized Target Acquisition Designation Sight/Pilot Night Vision Sensor (M-TADS/PNVS) system. The $90.6 million contract is the first of three options under the $111 million PBL contract awarded in 2012. The total four-year contract value is $375 million.

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Aviation, Space, Defense, Innovations,Technology, Science
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Launch. Land. Repeat.


Our vision: millions of people living and working in space. You can’t get there by throwing the hardware away. Watch the re-flight!


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Elon Musk Interview on The BBC about the future of electric vehicles & autonomous driving technology

In January 2016 Elon Musk talks to BBC Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones at Tesla's Design Studio in Hawthorne, California. The conversation covers the future of electric vehicles and of autonomous driving technology. The importance of Tesla building an affordable car is discussed along with Musk's confidence that Apple will build an electric car.

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Elon Musk on Instagram: “Falcon 9 back in the hangar at Cape Canaveral. No damage found, ready to fire again.”

Elon Musk on Instagram: “Falcon 9 back in the hangar at Cape Canaveral. No damage found, ready to fire again.” | D-FENS | Scoop.it




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Space: The visionaries take over

Space: The visionaries take over | D-FENS | Scoop.it

On Dec. 21, Elon Musk’s SpaceX, after launching 11 satellites into orbit, returned its 15-story booster rocket, upright and intact, to a landing pad at Cape Canaveral. That’s a $60 million mountain of machinery — recovered. (The traditional booster rocket either burns up or disappears into some ocean.)

The reusable rocket has arrived. Arguably, it arrived a month earlier when Blue Origin, a privately owned outfit created by Jeffrey P. Bezos (Amazon chief executive and owner of this newspaper) launched and landed its own booster rocket, albeit for a suborbital flight. But whether you attribute priority to Musk or Bezos, the two events together mark the inauguration of a new era in spaceflight.


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Bell UH-1Y "Venom" - GAU-21 .50cal/ M134 training - Marine Corps Air Station Yuma

Crewmembers of a UH-1Y Huey Venom helicopter fire the GAU-21 .50 caliber machine gun and an M134 minigun during a training mission out Marine Corps Air Station Yuma.

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British Royal Marines & US Marines - Aerial Insertion via MV-22 in Spain

U.S. Marines and British Royal Marines Commandos for an aerial insertion and foot patrol in Andalusia, Spain.
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Third Helicopter Tactics Instructors Course successfully accomplished - European Defence Agency

Third Helicopter Tactics Instructors Course successfully accomplished - European Defence Agency | D-FENS | Scoop.it

During the third Helicopter Tactics Instructors Course (HTIC), aircrew members from across Europe were working hard to master their skills. With successful delivery of the ground and simulator phase at RAF Linton-on-Ouse in the UK, and the phase at Vidsel test range near Lulea in northern Sweden, twelve student instructors from Austria, Germany, Sweden and the UK graduated from the course with Bronze or Silver HTI qualifications, corresponding to their experience and skills level.


It was the first case that the HTIC was delivered under an EDA Category B Programme with its own approved Programme Arrangement signed in March 2015 by Germany, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

The HTIC as a multinational tactical training course involved four helicopter types: Austrian Kiowa, Swedish Air Force Blackhawk and NH90, Chinook from the UK. It engaged more than one hundred military and civilian staff, and included more than two hundred hours of live flying.

The aim of HTIC is to teach experienced helicopter aircrew how to instruct tactics in the air and on the ground. It covers topics such as fighter jets evasion, electronic warfare against surface to air radar threats, convoy escort, vehicle check points and operating in the low-tech threat environment.  

A wide range of assets to provide the correct learning environment were required. The excellent support was provided by the Swedish Armed Forces with their Gripen fighter jets from 211 and 212 Squadron, the SK60 trainer aircraft and the ground-based radar defence systems as well as by the UK with their Hawk aircraft from 100 Squadron.

For the first time, the Staff Instructors included graduates from the previous courses. The two returning Swedish Instructors prove that the course can be self-sustaining and is able to achieve its aim of developing an internationally recognised cadre of tactics instructors who, in turn, can continue to deliver courses in the future. 

The HTIC is a high-value, intensive course that forges close links between all participants, creating a tight-knit community. Experience and knowledge are shared openly and honestly, and working on the principle of adopting best practices, continual improvement and standardisation serve as a constant theme. Everyone works together, harmonising tactics, techniques and procedures, with ever closer interoperability being the final goal. Through this international training, crews prepare for the coalition operations for the future.


They train the way they fight so that they can fight the way they have trained – together! 

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K-Max Helicopter and Indago Quadrotor Demonstrate Firefighting Capability at Griffiss Airfield

A team of Lockheed Martin and Kaman unmanned aircraft successfully demonstrated its ability to aid in firefighting operations. During the demonstration, the Indago quad rotor effectively identified hot spots, and provided data to an operator who directed the unmanned K-MAX helicopter to autonomously extinguish the flames. In one hour, the unmanned K-MAX helicopter lifted and dropped more than 24,000 pounds of water onto the fire.

“The unmanned K-MAX and Indago aircraft can work to fight fires day and night, in all weather, reaching dangerous areas without risking a life,” said Dan Spoor, vice president of Aviation and Unmanned Systems at Lockheed Martin’s Mission Systems and Training business.
“This demonstration signifies the potential for adapting proven unmanned systems and their advanced sensors and mission suites to augment manned firefighting operations, more than doubling the amount of time on station,” said Kaman Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Neal Keating.

The industry leader in lift efficiency, unmanned K-MAX provided heavy lift services by autonomously dipping water from a pond and delivering it precisely to the fire location. Manufactured by Kaman and outfitted with an advanced mission suite by Lockheed Martin, unmanned K-MAX has a twin-rotor design that maximizes lift capability in the most challenging environments. The heavy lift capability delivers effective firefighting and resupply operations to firefighters on the ground. Using its electro-optic/infrared (EO/IR) camera, K-MAX can locate hot spots and designate the location to its operator for water drops at that location. K-MAX has proven the ability to autonomously conduct resupply operations with the capability to deliver to four different locations. Its flexible multi-hook carousel is suited for attachments such as water buckets, litters and medical supplies in a highly stable system, allowing it to accomplish a wide range of missions.
The Indago’s industry-leading flight time and EO/IR gimbaled imager provides high quality data and enhanced situational awareness for operators to make real-time decisions. Indago is capable of providing tactical situational awareness and geo-location to aid in a variety of missions, from firefighting to precision agriculture to search and rescue.


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- General Safety Reminder -

- General Safety Reminder - | D-FENS | Scoop.it

If you need a mishap to admit there is a problem, then you are part of the problem.

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Investigation blames birdstrike for HH-60 "Pave Hawk" crash -56th Rescue Squadron - 48th Fighter Wing - Royal Air Force Station Lakenheath

Investigation blames birdstrike for HH-60 "Pave Hawk" crash -56th Rescue Squadron - 48th Fighter Wing - Royal Air Force Station Lakenheath | D-FENS | Scoop.it

Geese penetrated the windscreen of an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter during evening training mission in January, disabling the pilot and co-pilot and leading to the crash that killed four Air Force crewmembers, a military investigation revealed Wednesday.


The helicopter crashed on the eastern coast of England while practicing nighttime rescue mission scenario for a downed F-16 pilot. The Pave Hawk was flying over grass-covered marshland near Cley next the Sea when geese, likely startled by the noise rose in flight and hit the helicopter flying at about 110 feet above ground level.


Investigators concluded that at least three geese hit the windscreen, disabling the pilot, co-pilot and the aerial gunner. All three were rendered unconscious. One goose also hit the nose of the aircraft, disabling the trim and flight path stabilization systems.


With both pilots unconscious, and stabilization systems disabled, the helicopter banked left to the point it had no vertical lift. It crashed about three seconds after being struck by the geese, investigators said.


The Pave Hawk was assigned to the 48th Fighter Wing and based at the Royal Air Force station in Lakenheath.


A modified version of the better-known Black Hawks, the Pave Hawk is mostly used for combat search-and-rescue missions, such as recovering downed air crew members in hostile situations. They practice flying low, and have been deployed in military operations in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya.

Christian Albrecht's insight:

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT 

INVESTIGATION BOARD REPORT

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Drop Test of a Boeing CH-47C Helicopter

This research on the full-scale crash test of a CH-47C helicopter was performed by NASA Langley researcher Claude B. Castle. His accompanying technical report #TM X-3412 was issued in 1976. The research was a joint test program with the U.S. Army at Ft Eustis. Tests were conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center's Impact Dynamics Research Facility.

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Explained: AS350 Eurocopter Helicopter Self-Destructs

Some observers speculate that a bad episode of ground resonance may be to blame for the violent self-destruction of med-evac helicopter as it landed in a field in Para, Brazil. Few details are available about the incident, which reportedly took place Wednesday -- the same day video of the accident began spreading, online. The helicopter appears to be a Eurocopter A-Star AS350BA. Some reports state that there were four aboard -- two pilots, a doctor, and a nurse -- and all escaped serious injury in spite of the helicopter engaging full-flail mode. Several accounts repeat that the aircraft suffered excessive vibration while airborne and that vibration developed into destructive ground resonance after the aircraft landed.

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"Mast Bumping - Causes and Prevention" - US Army Agency for Aviation Safety Training Film - 1982

"Mast Bumping - Causes and Prevention" is a US Army training film from 1982. Its purpose was to help Army helicopter pilots identify the warning signs of mast bumping and move to correct them before a bump occurs .

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Aviation Safety: Bird Strike Hazard - 1984 Educational Film

The USAF looks at the actions aircrews can take to reduce potential bird strikes and the importance of reporting all bird strikes; Establishes the hazards of birds to aircraft; and details post-birdstrike procedures. Archival footage graphically illustrates the aftermath of birdstrikes on modern aircraft.

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Accident Case Study: Delayed Reaction by the AOPA Air Safety Institute - Aircraft Icing

On December 20, 2011, a Socata TBM-700 impacted the southbound lanes of I-287 near Morristown, New Jersey after plunging nearly 18,000 feet in less than a minute.
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Crash Drives Air Force to Restart CV-22 Pilot Formation Training

Crash Drives Air Force to Restart CV-22 Pilot Formation Training | D-FENS | Scoop.it

The Air Force plans to reinstate substantial formation flight training for CV-22 Osprey pilots that it eliminated four years ago, AOL Defense has learned. Reinstatement of the training four years after the service ended it is an implicit admission, V-22 aviators said, that better training might have prevented the June 13 crash of a CV-22B in Florida.

 

The June accident near Eglin Air Force Base injured all five crew aboard, destroyed their $78.5 million aircraft and cost their squadron commander his job. The CV-22B crashed after its pilot flew through the rotor wake of an Osprey he was following in formation. The mishap Osprey went into a sudden, uncommanded roll to the left, and while the pilot and copilot were able to regain control, their aircraft hit some tall pine trees and slammed to the ground upright.

 

The hazard stems from the peculiar configuration of the helicopter-airplane hybrid Osprey. Built in a 50-50 partnership by Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. and Boeing Co., the Osprey tilts two 38-foot-diameter "proprotors" on its wingtips upward to take off and land like a helicopter and swivels them forward to fly with the speed and range of a fixed-wing turboprop airplane. The Osprey's proprotors are undersized for the aircraft's bulk – a design compromise dictated by the need to fly V-22s from amphibious assault ships for Marine Corps missions – and consequently have to generate a relatively large amount of thrust for each square foot of area the V-22's rotor disks describe. As a result, when the Osprey flies like a helicopter, its proprotors leave behind a wake of turbulent air so powerful and persistent some V-22 pilots call it "Superman's Cape."

 

All Osprey pilots are taught that flying through Superman's Cape can knock the lift out from under one of their rotors, causing an uncommanded roll. They are also instructed to avoid that danger by keeping at least 250 feet of separation between their cockpit and the cockpit of a V-22 ahead of them, staying out of the lead aircraft's 5 to 7 o'clock position, flying at least 25 feet higher than the lead Osprey, increasing that vertical "step up" to at least 50 feet when crossing the lead aircraft's path and never crossing the lead's path in a descending turn.

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NASA Helicopter Drop Test Safety Study - LandIR Facility - Langley Research Center

Test Helicopter to Study Safety Anybody who says NASA researchers don't know how to have a smashing good time has not met a team at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. They are test engineers whose job it is to make aircraft safer by crashing them. In late August those engineers plan to drop a 45-foot long helicopter fuselage from about 30 feet to test improved seat belts and seats and to collect crashworthiness data.

NASA is collaborating with the Navy, Army and Federal Aviation Administration on the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed full-scale crash tests at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility. LandIR, a 240-foot high, 400-foot long gantry, has an almost 50-year history. It started out as the Lunar Landing Research Facility, where Neil Armstrong and other astronauts learned to land on the moon. Then it became a crash test facility where engineers could simulate aircraft accidents. And recently it added a big pool where NASA is testing Orion space capsule mock-ups in anticipation of water landings.

The August drop test is one of the most complicated and ambitious aircraft crash experiments at NASA Langley in recent memory. "We have instrumented a former Marine helicopter airframe with cameras and accelerometers," said lead test engineer Martin Annett. "Almost 40 cameras inside and outside of the helicopter will record how 13 crash test dummies react before, during and after impact. Onboard computers will also record more than 350 channels of data."

External cameras will capture images of an unusual looking helicopter. Instead of the usual Marine gray, technicians painted one entire side in black polka dots over a white background. It is not a fashion statement, but a photographic technique called full field photogrammetry. Each dot represents a data point. High speed cameras filming at 500 images per second track each dot, so after everything is over, researchers can plot and "see" exactly how the fuselage buckled, bent, cracked or collapsed under crash loads. Something else that is being used for the first time during this test is a well-known video game motion sensor. "We installed an Xbox Kinect inside the helicopter," said Justin Littell, test engineer. "We want to see if it can be used as an additional instrument to track dummies' movements.

All the dummies, cameras, sensors, instruments, and experiments will come together, some even perhaps literally, when the helicopter is lifted into the air about 30 feet - then pendulum swung by cables into a bed of soil. Just before impact pyro-technic devices release the suspension cables from the helicopter fuselage to allow free flight. The helicopter will hit the ground at about 30 miles an hour. The impact condition represents a severe but survivable condition under both civilian and military requirements. Another crash test of a similar helicopter equipped with additional technology, including composite airframe retrofits, is planned for next year. Both tests are part of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate's Fundamental Aeronautics Program Rotary Wing Project.

The Navy provided the CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter fuselages, seats, a number of crash test dummies and other experiments for the test. The Army contributed a crash test dummy that is lying down similar to a patient on a medical evacuation litter. The FAA provided a side facing specialized crash test dummy and part of the data acquisition system. A private company, CONAX Florida Corporation DBA Cobham Life Support in St. Petersburg, Fla., also contributed an active restraint system for the cockpit. NASA will use the results of both tests to try to improve rotorcraft performance and efficiency, in part by assessing the reliability of high performance, lightweight composite materials.

Researchers also want to increase industry knowledge and create more complete computer models that can be used to design better helicopters. The ultimate goal of NASA rotary wing research is to help make helicopters and other vertical take off and landing vehicles more serviceable -- able to carry more passengers and cargo -- quicker, quieter, safer and greener. Improved designs might allow helicopters to be used more extensively in the airspace system.

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LandIR Facility


LandIR Fact Sheet


LandIR Facility Overview Video


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International Helicopter Safety Team - Helicopter Harzard Identification

Helicopter Hazard Identification and Risk Management - Practical Examples
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Breaking the Barriers to a Generative Culture - CHC Safety & Quality Summit 2014

Synthesizes the latest findings in neuroscience and psychology with real life lessons from cultural transformation efforts in a variety of settings from large, multi-national corporations to small helicopter operators. References for this work include:

  • Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking Fast and Slow
  • Dr. Richard Restak’s The Naked Brain and Mozart’s Brain and the Fighter Pilot
  • Daniel Goleman’s Focus; Everett Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations
  • Charles Duhigg’s The Power of Habit
  • NTSB report NTSB/AAB-06/06, PB2007-100699 on the crash of a Gulfstream III on approach to Houston’s Hobby Airport on 22 November 2004.
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The Potential of Technologies to Mitigate Helicopter Accident Factors - European Helicopter Safety Team Study

The Potential of Technologies to Mitigate Helicopter Accident Factors -  European Helicopter Safety Team Study | D-FENS | Scoop.it

Technology is not high on the list of accident / incident factors, as it is merely the lack of technology that may have led to an accident. Technology provides a variety of solutions that can contribute to prevent various types of accidents or to increase survivability. The EHEST’s Specialist Team (ST) Technology was created with the objective to assess the potential of existing and emerging technologies to mitigate accident factors.

The ST Technology work consists of listing technologies and linking them with accident causes and contributing factors, and then to assess the potential of those technologies to mitigate safety issues. The top 20 safety issues have been identified from EHEST accident analyses. To assess the potential of technologies the team has developed a tool, the so-called technology matrix. The work continued by identifying individual technologies and rating those technologies.

The technology matrix includes 145 technologies, of which 93 have been rated. There are 15 ‘highly promising’ technologies (that jointly can potentially mitigate 11 of the top 20 safety issues), and 50 that are ‘moderately promising’. Five technologies are highly promising for three or more safety issues.

The industry is highly recommended to channel their technological development in line with the results of the study. The regulatory side should find ways to improve safety by adopting the technologies. Researchers and universities are encouraged to concentrate their efforts on developing the lacking technologies and the technologies which have a low Technology Readiness Level.

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Download the study here.

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TransAsia ATR flight data suggests wrong engine shut down

TransAsia ATR flight data suggests wrong engine shut down | D-FENS | Scoop.it
Flight-data recorder information suggests the crew operating the crashed TransAsia Airways ATR 72-600 may have shut down the left-hand engine of the aircraft shortly after the right-hand engine flamed out.

Taiwan’s Aviation Safety Council has released engine plots from the recovered flight-data recorder that appear to show that, shortly after takeoff, a master warning indicated a flame-out of the right-hand powerplant. The aircraft was at an altitude of around 1,200ft at the time.

The data indicates that the propeller of the right-hand engine feathered.

But less than a minute after the warning, the data shows a fuel shut-off to the left-hand engine. There is no indication on the data plot that a flame-out warning was active for this engine.

Around the same time, air traffic control communications show that the crew made a 'mayday' call, citing an engine flame-out.

Further data from ASC shows that around 42s after shutting off the fuel to the left engine, it was restarted, around the same time that a stall warning sounded.

At no time was fuel to the right-hand engine shut off, the data suggests.
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Accident Case Study - Emergency Management - Gyro Failure

On December 16, 2012, a Piper Cherokee impacted terrain during an instrument approach to Fayetteville, North Carolina. In this case study, we use ATC audio and radar data to reconstruct the tragic flight and find out what went wrong.
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Curated by Christian Albrecht
Aerospace, Defense, Innovation,Technology, Science