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D'Dline 2020, vecteur du bâtiment durable
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Agora Tapei Tower : so green !

Agora Tapei Tower : so green ! | D'Dline 2020, vecteur du bâtiment durable | Scoop.it

Taipei just broke ground on a twisting skyscraper that is wrapped with a jungle of vertical gardens...

 

 


Via Lauren Moss
Florence @ddline2020 's insight:

Designed by Vincent Callebaut Architecture, the 455,000-square-foot Agora Tower will have an orchard, a vegetable garden, space for aromatic and medicinal plants, and a compost and rainwater capture system.

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Pagina Uno's curator insight, March 10, 2013 3:10 AM

Progettato per imitare la struttura elicoidale del DNA, le torri sono organizzate intorno ad un nucleo centrale che ha permesso la realizzare un "iper-abbondanza di giardini sospesi." Questi traboccano di piante commestibili e decorative, che consentono ai residenti dei 40 appartamenti di lusso di raccogliere una grande quantità di cibo. Inoltre, un sistema di raccolta delle acque piovane allevia il peso sulla rete idrica comunale e dà indipendenza al complesso.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, March 10, 2013 10:30 AM
This is a real fad now, skyscrapers that twist toward the sky like that, isn't it? I can't help but wonder about the legacy. Are we entering a new era where the species is losing its self consciousness, or have these architects simply not heard the old limerick about the heartbreak when the man who was threaded one way fell in love with the woman who was threaded the other way?
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Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built...

Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built... | D'Dline 2020, vecteur du bâtiment durable | Scoop.it

The cities of the future will have waste-to-energy plants, not shopping malls or churches, at their center, according to urban designer Mitchell Joachim of Terreform ONE.

At DLD Cities in London, he said "cities have centers that celebrate previous centuries -- in Europe, the cities celebrated spirituality, with cathedrals. After some time, the cathedrals became downtown cores- and celebrations of capitalism and commercialism".

The cities of the future will celebrate "the belief of what keeps us alive" - or elements of the city that make our lives better.

 

Terreform ONE, a green design company in Brooklyn, explores biohacks for the ecological issues facing modern cities. For instance, the waste New York City produces every hour weighs as much as the Statue of Liberty - in the future that waste could be recompacted into building blocks, or recycled "bales". Looking beyond recycling, though, it would be even better to create a city which didn't produce waste in the first place...

That means growing thousands of homes -- building a new suburb could involve twisting, pruning and manipulating large trees into the frames of buildings. "There would be no difference between the home and nature -- it would be something that would be a positive addition to the ecology," explained Joachim.

 

For more information on these innovative concepts, including biomimicry and new green technology proposals for future cities, stop by to read the complete article and visit referenced links on urban sustainability...


Via Lauren Moss, Rowan Edwards, Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Sustainable Innovation at Gardens By The Bay, Singapore: World Building of the Year

Sustainable Innovation at Gardens By The Bay, Singapore: World Building of the Year | D'Dline 2020, vecteur du bâtiment durable | Scoop.it

Much of the environmental control is achieved through passive means, before resorting to less efficient, active systems such as air conditioning. Fresh air filters through a desiccant, then to conventional chillers. As the desiccant extracts moisture, it also cools the air inside. But to keep the desiccant functioning, energy is needed to remove the accumulated moisture. This is where sustainable technologies come in: An on-site biomass boiler—fueled entirely with green waste from the city’s national parks—and hot air collected from the top of the glasshouses provide sufficient energy to cool the conservatories.

 

“The result is not an experimental building, but its ventilation strategy has an experimental component,” Finch said. “In a globalized environment, there is so much interest in how we deal with density and this combination of urbanism with a garden that is both an attraction and nature is a wonderful solution. If they can cool these glasshouses through natural cooling, we should ask why it can’t be done in other buildings?”


Via Olive Ventures, Susan Davis Cushing, Lauren Moss
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