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Here We Are Now: More Human Than Human: A case for Transhumanism

Here We Are Now: More Human Than Human: A case for Transhumanism | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Are we ready for the next stage in human evolution? Most of what got Homo sapiens sapiens where it is today is the result of natural selection. It can easily be argued that more recent generations were, at least somewhat, effected by unintended artificial selection. For those who aren't familiar, think of natural selection as "survival of the fittest" and artificial selection as how we get different dog breads - selective breading. That is an oversimplification, but it is the general idea.

By unintentional artificial selection, I mean to say ideas like more nutritious foods that are made by artificial selection and manufacturing (vitamin-fortified foods, etc.) having made us a bit taller and hit puberty earlier and earlier. These are changes that are byproducts of simply trying to be healthier. Perhaps, it is time to start taking more advantage of this ability and make some serious changes, intentionally. I'm not talking about becoming a new species entirely, but possibly creating a new subspecies. Maybe we won't be growing blue fur or born shooting lasers out of our eyes, but H. sapiens superior just may become a legitimate classification.

This is, by far, not the first time this has been proposed. Given the previous examples, we could say it's already happening. To those who take it quite seriously, it is called transumanism, or H+. There is even a magazine called "h+ Magazine", that is completely dedicated to it and its relation to singularity. There is an entire movement, that I myself only recently became truly aware of. What I am talking about may be considered a bit different from the technological singularity - a point in time where machines are responsible for all, or most, innovation - you may have heard of. I am talking about a time where we are those machines.

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“Stop the Cyborgs” launches public campaign against Google Glass

“Stop the Cyborgs” launches public campaign against Google Glass | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
"It destroys having multiple identities, and I find that quite a scary concept.

 

Less than two weeks ago, Seattle’s 5 Point Cafe became the first known establishment in the United States (and possibly the world) to publicly ban Google Glass, the highly anticipated augmented reality device set to be released later this year.

The “No Glass” logo that the café published on its website was developed and released (under a Creative Commons license) by a new London-based group called “Stop the Cyborgs.” The group is composed of three young Londoners who decided to make a public case against Google Glass and other similar devices.

“If it's just a few geeks wearing it, it's a niche tool [and] I don't think it's a problem,” said Adam, 27, who prefers only to be identified by his first name. He communicated with Ars via Skype and an encrypted Hushmail e-mail account.

“But if suddenly everyone is wearing it and this becomes as prevalent as smartphones—you can see it becomes very intrusive very quickly. It's not about the tech, it's about the social culture around it. If you think about what Google's business model is, it started as a search engine, and then Google Analytics. [Now, Google is] almost characterizing its [territory as being] the rest of the world. It's a loss of space that isn't online. [Google Glass] destroys having multiple identities, and I find that quite a scary concept.”

Adam admitted he has never actually used or interacted with Google Glass in person, but he said he has extensive experience with augmented reality and currently is a post-doctoral student specializing in "machine learning" at a London university that he declined to name. He added that he and two friends are behind Stop the Cyborgs.

Google has yet to release much detailed information about Google Glass, only allowing small trials involving its own employees and select journalists and developers.

"


Via Wildcat2030
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STRP Biennial, a walk through the city of cyborgs - we make money not art

STRP Biennial, a walk through the city of cyborgs - we make money not art | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it

Via Xaos
luiy's insight:

The theme of this year's exhibition is City of Cyborgs. Not the city of androids, clunky clones and man/machines contraptions but the city we are already walking through, smartphones in our pockets, implants in our bodies for some and ready to get our hands on Google glasses. City of Cyborgs in STRP speak means animatronics, opera for prehistoric creatures, a forest of interactive lasers, tapas made from edible solar cells, absurd mega machines and lots of dance. The high tech, the low tech, the digital, the organic and everything in between and beyond.

 

This year, STRP provided me this with a good excuse to catch up with and reflect on today's cyborg scenery and with the opportunity to discover artists and works i had never encountered so far.

I might be late to the party but i've just added the name of Ief Spincemaille to my list of young artists t follow. Sadly, I didn't manage to get my hands on his Reverse Blinking goggles. All i can say is that people kept telling me "Have you tried it? Have you?! it's brilliant! Brilliant!' Since i've missed the fun, i'll just copy/paste the description:

 

Imagine being caught with your head inside a photo camera. It's completely dark. Only when the shutter opens for a very brief moment, you perceive a flash of the world. You see people as static figures, entire street scenes as moments frozen in time. Everything you lay your eyes on seems to acquire the characteristics of a photograph. The shutter moves so fast that it leaves no space for movement. The plates move up and down causing your eyes to make a reverse blinking movement: the plates are generally shut off, and only open and close quickly and briefly. The spectators can open and close the shutter themselves with a button, allowing them to determine the frequency, but not the speed (shutter time).

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Xaos's curator insight, March 19, 2013 5:27 AM

" the sixth edition of STRP in Eindhoven. The yearly festival is now a biennial but the formula hasn't changed much: 10 days of science&tech-infused art and of electronic music."

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Maurits Burgers: The anti-Glass front says Stop the Cyborgs

Maurits Burgers: The anti-Glass front says Stop the Cyborgs | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
'These concerns go beyond privacy. There are serious consequences for human society' Glashelder http://t.co/CwsUEQ0y6U
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Brain Researchers Can Detect Who We Are Thinking About

Brain Researchers Can Detect Who We Are Thinking About | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it

Scientists scanning the human brain can now tell whom a person is thinking of, the first time researchers have been able to identify what people are imagining from imaging technologies.

Work to visualize thought is starting to pile up successes. Recently, scientists have used brain scans to decode imagery directly from the brain, such as what number people have just seen and what memory a person is recalling. They can now even reconstruct videos of what a person has watched based on their brain activity alone. Cornell University cognitive neuroscientist Nathan Spreng and his colleagues wanted to carry this research one step further by seeing if they could deduce the mental pictures of people that subjects conjure up in their heads.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
luiy's insight:

Imagining others


His team first gave 19 volunteers descriptions of four imaginary people they were told were real. Each of these characters had different personalities. Half the personalities were agreeable, described as liking to cooperate with others; the other half were less agreeable, depicted as cold and aloof or having similar traits. In addition, half these characters were described as outgoing and sociable extroverts, while the others were less so, depicted as sometimes shy and inhibited. The scientists matched the genders of these characters to each volunteer and gave them popular names like Mike, Chris, Dave or Nick, or Ashley, Sarah, Nicole or Jenny.

The researchers then scanned volunteers’ brains using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which measures brain activity by detecting changes in blood flow. During the scans, the investigators asked participants to predict how each of the four fictitious people might behave in a variety of scenarios — for instance, if they were at a bar and someone else spilled a drink, or if they saw a homeless veteran asking for change.

“Humans are social creatures, and the social world is a complex place,” Spreng says. “A key aspect to navigating the social world is how we represent others.”

 

The scientists discovered that each of the four personalities were linked to unique patterns of brain activity in a part of the organ known as the medial prefrontal cortex. In other words, researchers could tell whom their volunteers were thinking about.

 

“This is the first study to show that we can decode what people are imagining,” Spreng says.

 

Unlocking brain’s personality models
The medial prefrontal cortex helps people deduce traits about others. These findings suggest this region is also where personality models are encoded, assembled and updated, helping people understand and predict the likely behavior of others and prepare for the future.

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Bot, human, cyborg: an automated anthropology (with tweets) · hautepop

We talk as though the distinction between human and non-human actors in social media was obvious - and fundamental. What if it's not?

Via Andrea Naranjo
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Bioteeth generated from your own cells | KurzweilAI

Bioteeth generated from your own cells | KurzweilAI | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
Current design of a dental implant (credit: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons) Researchers are developing a method to replace missing (Bioteeth generated from your own cells http://t.co/HEzwCTYdRt...
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Is artificial intelligence more of a threat to humanity than an asteroid ...

Is artificial intelligence more of a threat to humanity than an asteroid ... | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
Over at Aeon magazine, Ross Anderson has a fascinating story about a group of futurists who are trying to prepare humanity for the intelligence explosion. This is the moment when artificial intelligence surpasses humanity in ...

Via RomanGodzich
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Nicholas Smith's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:29 PM

This is a particularly interesting article which tells readers that artificial intelligence may be more of a threat to humanity than disasters, such an asteroids, global warming and even nuclear war. This theory should definitely be taken into consideration as we are already making huge advancements in artificial intelligence and in the near future, robots will most likely be smarter than humans.

 

The aim of this article is to put forward the idea that robots could do more harm to us than help us. Robots could also be a threat in the sense that they may be misused and used for harm and not for good, more so. This article is extremely interesting and is definitely something that could happen in the future, if artificial intelligence is misused by people. This was generally a worthwhile read and was useful to my research at it provides an alternative idea for the uses of artificial intelligence, stating that they could pose an extremely large threat to us.

 

The limitations to this article as that it is extremely long and draws out the information throughout the article. I still believe that this is an extremely useful article and something that can be used in my research topic as it directly relates to the future of artificial intelligence.

Tom Gilbert's curator insight, March 22, 2013 7:42 AM

Many science fiction cultures interpret artificial intelligence as a generally bad thing, is this because of our fear of the unknown? that we could possibly build something more sophisticated than our brain (fun fact: the brain is the only thing to have named itself,profound, i know...) or is this general fear of artificial intelligence root from the fact of how unnatural a concept it is to us. Recently nasa has been concerned of coming asteroids, as far enough as to plan for  some sort of planetery defense mechanism, so comparing artificial intelligence to the impact of an asteroid with the earth shows not only how seriously some are concerned about developments in the technology, but for many it may cause them to feel less threatened by the AI, because of how tangible an asteroid is. If we can see it; it poses a larger threat.

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ARTIFICIAL PARADISE,INC.

Artificial Paradise, Inc is an experimental film anticipating a future where a major corporation has developed an unique software, based on organic virtual reality,…...

Via proto-e-co-logics
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Why The Human Body Will Be The Next Computer Interface

Why The Human Body Will Be The Next Computer Interface | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
By now you’ve probably heard a lot about wearables, living services, the Internet of Things, and smart materials.
luiy's insight:
EMBEDDED TECH BRINGS A NEW LANGUAGE OF INTERACTION

The new language will be ultra subtle and totally intuitive, building not on crude body movements but on subtle expressions and micro-gestures. This is akin to the computer mouse and the screen. The Mac interface would never have worked if you needed to move the mouse the same distance as it moved on the screen. It would have been annoying and deeply unergonomic. This is the same for the gestural interface. Why swipe your arm when you can just rub your fingers together. What could be more natural than staring at something to select it, nodding to approve something? This is the world that will be possible when we have hundreds of tiny sensors mapping every movement, outside and within our bodies. For privacy, you’ll be able to use imperceptible movements, or even hidden ones such as flicking your tongue across your teeth.

Think about this scenario: You see someone at a party you like; his social profile is immediately projected onto your retina--great, a 92% match. By staring at him for two seconds, you trigger a pairing protocol. He knows you want to pair, because you are now glowing slightly red in his retina screen. Then you slide your tongue over your left incisor and press gently. This makes his left incisor tingle slightly. He responds by touching it. The pairing protocol is completed.

What is lovely about these micro gestures and expressions is that they are totally intuitive. Who doesn’t stare at someone a second too long when they fancy them, and licking your lips is a spontaneously flirtatious gesture. The possible interactions are almost limitless and move us closer and closer to a natural human-computer interface. At this point, the really intriguing thing is that the interface has virtually disappeared; the screens are gone, and the input devices are dispersed around the body.

What we will explore in the next article is the end game of this kind of technology as we bring the organic into the machine and create a symbiotic world where DNA, nanobots, and synthetic biology are orchestrated to create the ultimate learning devices. We will also explore the role of the designer when there is no interface left to design: Will they become choreographers and storytellers instead? Or will they disappear from the landscape entirely, to be replaced by algorithmic processes, artificial intelligence and gene sequencing? What we can say for sure is that the speed of change is accelerating so rapidly that the advanced interface technologies that we marvel at today will seem as out-dated as FORTRAN before we have time to draw breath.

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Call for Articles: Cylons, Cyborgs and Androids! | Linux Journal

Call for Articles: Cylons, Cyborgs and Androids! | Linux Journal | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
But really just Androids. Do you develop for Android? Have you replaced your computer with an Android tablet? Are you using Android it a way no one has ever considered before? If so, we want to hear from you!
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hybrids & subversives: the cyborg as teacher | theory.cribchronicles.com

teachers are instruments of the educational system. and in the 21st century, teachers are required to be instruments of technologies, too.

Via Andrea Naranjo
luiy's insight:

I began teaching online in 1998, the same year I encountered Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto (1991) for the first time. Her cyborg – partial, ironic, always hybrid – offered a model for identity that helped me navigate that new environment. The cyborg’s emphasis on breaking down binaries enabled and encouraged me to grapple with some of the institutional and technocratic power relations that shaped our online learning context, in ways that have continued to influence my understanding of my educational practice and my research to this day.

 

The cyborg teacher is a hybrid, both an instrument of the schooling system and yet subversive to it: the cyborg teacher is a learner too. Teaching from the cyborg point of view helped me frame my digital classroom not as “less” or “more” than conventional learning spaces, but instead as a site for building ties of curiosity and affinity. It helped me escape the concept of the virtual and approach my online work very much as real; human and technological, both.

 

Now, fifteen years down the road, I see the cyborg particularly as a metaphor for networked identities. These are the kinds of selves cultivated when people integrate online social networks into their personal and professional practices not just as consumers but producers: when they blog, tweet, filter, curate, and share ideas within networks of shared interests.

In a time when our technological platforms are primarily corporate-owned and even mundane daily practices like bank card usage expose us to constant digital surveillance, the cyborg strikes me as a particularly important figure. A teacher by example, she collapses the binary distinctions our media narratives are so eager to create about social technologies.

The message of the cyborg, as I see it, is that we are complicit, part of this digital world. But we are not necessarily subject to its terms: in an age in which human agency can seem dwarfed by the innumerable invisible digital systems we interact with, the cyborg – illegitimate offspring of the very things she subverts – stands for me as a figure of hope.

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Insect assassin drones? Armed drones choosing targets? What could possibly go wrong? | ComputerWorld

Insect assassin drones? Armed drones choosing targets? What could possibly go wrong? | ComputerWorld | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it

Insect assassin drones, swarm drone surveillance and armed drones that pick their own targets: What could possibly go wrong?

 


Via Alessio Erioli
luiy's insight:

MAVs: Bumblebee-sized surveillance swarms and assassin drones

 

Now, imagine those bug-sized spies working in a swarm, each with a specific surveillance mission. Precisely as a bumblebee can sting a person, these tiny bumblebee-sized drones can "attack" and "sting" the target, surely making them the world's smallest assassins. The video said these MAVs could be airdropped or hand-launched. Because of the tiny size, they can "hide" in plain sight. They may be used in missions that last weeks, meaning they would need to "harvest energy" from sunlight, wind, vibrating machinery, or even re-energize off of power lines.

 

 

 

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FDA Approves Eye Implant Enabling The Blind To Partially See

FDA Approves Eye Implant Enabling The Blind To Partially See | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Argus II artificial retina to restore partial sight to patients who are blind.
luiy's insight:

Though the Argus II has been in development for years, scientists at Lawrence Livermore have been busy working on the Argus III, a system which promises even greater resolution with at least 200 electrodes. Ultimately, the goal will be to get up to 1,000 electrodes as that would enable facial recognition. Furthermore, the ability to help people suffering from other types of vision loss, such as the common age-related macular degeneration, are being pursued.

 

The Argus II is the first of its kind to receive FDA approval, marking a new era of medical visual prosthetics and the eventual adoption of elective cybernetics. What begins as sensory restoration due to disease will undoubtedly evolve into augmentation as the technology matures. In fact, this is exactly what Neil Harbisson has experienced over the last few years, prompting him to start the Cyborg Foundation to legally recognize those with augmentation.

 

Advances in bionic eyes hold the promise of progressing beyond the physical limitations of biology and ensuring the vital sense of vision can be granted throughout someone’s lifetime. Hopefully, the Argus II is merely the first in a coming wave of devices that can bring vision to those who have had to live without.
[image: BBC]

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Robots Get Their Own Internet

Robots Get Their Own Internet | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
Robot-only internet! Self-teaching robots!

Via Ben van Lier
luiy's insight:

Rapyuta. Remember that name. That is the name of a new shadow internet intended only for robots, designed by the international organization RoboEarth. Rapyuta is a cloud-computing engine, designed to let robots share the things they learn about the world with each other and to offload computational tasks to far more powerful computers allowing them to solve problems more complicated than they ever could on their own. The mind-melding system, says New York Magazine, won’t bring about the end of humanity, because its creators say so.

 

[Rapyuta] sounds fine in theory — if you trust robots. But for those convinced that providing robots with a common brain will only hasten the arrival of the robot uprising against mankind, then Rapyuta is more like a dark harbinger of the apocalypse. We happen to be one of those people, so we reached out to Dr. Heico Sandee, RoboEarth’s program manager at Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, to reassure us that Rapyuta will not lead to our destruction.

 

“That is indeed an important point to be addressed,” Sandee acknowledged in an-email. But he assured us that robots will use Rapyuta for no such thing.

I mean, just look at this helpful promotional video released by the people at RoboEarth:



Read more: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/smartnews/2013/03/robots-get-their-own-internet/#ixzz2ONtjNqLm ;
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

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I, Quantum Robot - Scientific American (blog)

I, Quantum Robot - Scientific American (blog) | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
Scientific American (blog)
I, Quantum Robot
Scientific American (blog)
Artificial Intelligence is the ability of a computer system to operate in a manner similar to human intelligence.

Via A. J. Alvarez-Socorro
luiy's insight:

The quantum robot is the idea of combining quantum theory with robot technology. In other words, it is a practical use of the combination of quantum computing and robot technology. Quantum computing involves using quantum systems and quantum states to do computations.

 

A robot is an automated machine that is capable of doing a set of complex tasks. In some applications of robots, the programming used to run the robots may be based on artificial intelligence. Artificial Intelligence is the ability of a computer system to operate in a manner similar to human intelligence. Think of artificial intelligence as if you were training a machine to act like a human. Essentially, quantum robots are complex quantum systems.They are mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with their environments. Several programs would be involved in the operation of the robot. These programs would be quantum searching algorithms and quantum reinforcement learning algorithms.

 

Quantum reinforcement learning is based on superposition of the quantum state and quantum parallelism. A quantum state is a system that is a set of quantum numbers. The four basic quantum numbers represent the energy level, angular momentum, spin, and magnetization. In the superposition of quantum states, the idea is to get one state to look like another.

 

Let’s say I have two dogs. One dog knows how to fetch a bone (energy level), sit up (angular momentum), give a high five (spin), and shake hands (magnetization). Now, let’s apply the superposition of quantum states. Since one dog has been trained and given the commands, the other dog must learn to mimic or copy what the first dog did. Each time a command is achieved, reinforcement is given. The reinforcement for the dog would be a bone (or no bone if the command is not achieved).

 

In quantum reinforcement learning, it is slightly different. The idea would be similar to an “If-Then” statement. An example would be if the quantum state has a certain energy level, then the angular momentum is certain value. This idea of “If-Then” statements in the quantum world leads to an idea which can be a topic of its own; Quantum Logic.

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A. J. Alvarez-Socorro's curator insight, March 18, 2013 5:50 PM

Very interesting, I enjoyed reading it.

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Digital Dualisms of the Real » Cyborgology

Digital Dualisms of the Real » Cyborgology | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it

Via juandoming
luiy's insight:

First, I want to refocus the definition of digital dualism to the moments where people downplay the role of the digital when speaking of something they think is material (wrongly called “real”) as well as downplaying the role of the material when speaking of something they think is primarily digital (wrongly called “virtual”). Regardless of your position on “reality”, this is digital dualism that underestimates the enmeshment of information and materiality, leading to ideas like Facebook comprises “virtual” rather than “real” friendships, that there is some “second self” that you inhabit online, and so on. Over the dinner table, in blog comments, in op-eds, in research papers, people often simply forget the material when talking about the digital and the digital in the material. Yes, people may almost never say the Internet is some distant other universe, but people do often overstate how distant and unrelated the material and the digital are. Those holding this digital dualist, zero-sum, conception of the on and offline are the ones surprised byresearch showing that those who do more online tend to also do more offline, opposed to the idea that people are trading “real life” in favor of living on Facebook.

Thus, digital dualism is the tendency to see the digital and material as too distinct, rather than enmeshed, consistent with the definition of the term I worked with one website to create:

n. The belief that online and offline are largely distinct and independent realities.

Second, I want to refocus on the question of how digital dualism—this tendency to underestimate digital-material enmeshment—often clears a clean path towards the claim that one (usually, but not always, the material) is more real, deep, human, and true. Not ontology, these are cultural value statements based on the idea that the on and offline are distinct rather than enmeshed.

My most passionate expression of this concern is my IRL Fetish essay where I argue that calling the digital “virtual” lets one simultaneously claim that which is not digital is “real.” It allows one to say that there is a crisis of the real, that it is disappearing in precisely the same moment that we are obsessed over it.** The real isn’t going away, what people are doing on Facebook is real and has everything to do with the offline. I end up concluding that that those asking us to disconnect and log off are too optimistic, just like Facebook is filled with the offline, the so-called offline, like Carr’s wilderness and Turkle’s Cape Cod, is similarly saturated with the online. Because I’m a giant dork, this is the argument that drives my interest. This is the anti-digital dualist, augmented, synthetic perspective that views information-saturation in what people call “offline” as well as the material, human, and political in what people call “online”.***

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How Much Longer Until Humanity Becomes A Hive Mind? - io9

How Much Longer Until Humanity Becomes A Hive Mind? - io9 | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
How Much Longer Until Humanity Becomes A Hive Mind?

Via Ben van Lier
luiy's insight:
A double-edged sword

We also talked about the potential risks.

“There’s the risk of bugs in hardware or software,” says Naam. “There’s the risk of malware or viruses that infect this. There’s the risk of hackers being able to break into the implants in your head. We’ve already seen hackers demonstrate that they can remotely take over pacemakers and insulin pumps. The same risks exist here.”

But the big societal risk, says Naam, stems entirely from the question of who controls this technology.

“That’s the central question I ask in Nexus,” he says. “If we all have brain implants, you can imagine it driving a very bottom’s up world — another Renaissance, a world where people are free and creating and sharing more new ideas all the time. Or you can imagine it driving a world like that of 1984, where central authorities are the ones in control, and they’re the ones using these direct brain technologies to monitor people, to keep people in line, or even to manipulate people into being who they’re supposed to be. That’s what keeps me up at night.”

Warwick, on the other hand, told me that the “biggest risk is that some idiot — probably a politician or business person — may stop it from going ahead.” He suspects it will lead to a digital divide between those who have and those who do not, but that it’s a natural progression very much in line with evolution to date.

In response to the question of privacy, Sandberg quipped, “Privacy? What privacy?”

Our lives, he says, will reside in the cloud, and on servers owned by various companies that also sell results from them to other organizations.

“Even if you do not use telepathy-like systems, your behaviour and knowledge can likely be inferred from the rich data everybody else provides,” he says. “And the potential for manipulation, surveillance and propaganda are endless.”

Our cloud exoselves

Without a doubt, the telepathic noosphere will alter the human condition in ways we cannot even begin to imagine. The Noosphere will be an extension of our minds. And as David Chalmers and Andy Clark have noted, we should still regard external mental processes as being genuine even though they’re technically happening outside our skulls. Consequently, as Sandberg told me, our devices and “cloud exoselves” will truly be extensions of our minds.

“Potentially very enhancing extensions,” he says, “although unlikely to have much volition of their own.”

Sandberg argues that we shouldn’t want our exoselves to be too independent, since they’re likely to make mistakes in our name. “We will always want to have veto power, a bit like how the conscious level of our minds has veto on motor actions being planned,” he says.

Veto power over our cloud exoselves? The future will be a very strange place, indeed.

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Stop The Cyborgs

Stop The Cyborgs | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
Fighting the algorithmic future one bit at a time (‘Stop The Cyborgs’ is a response to the Google Glass project and other technology trends: http://t.co/ULx7W4u2JE (via @edwingardner))...
luiy's insight:

Two things are quickly lost in any internet debate: humor and nuance. So in retrospect we should have guessed that people would find it hard to read past the name ‘Stop The Cyborgs‘. We thought it would be a bit of fun – a suitably cyberpunk sounding opposition group. However we have been variously accused of hating technology & hating anyone who isn’t 100% biological. This is not the case. We love technology and we love people. Indeed we even wear clothes and create technology ourselves. Some of us might even have metal bits.

So lets break down the main points for the short of attention.:

Google Glass and other technologies have massive implications for privacy and social interaction.Ordinary people should not leave it to the geeks and the corporations to invent the future and define social norms.

More generally our argument is that technological systems shape daily life and society. They are not politically or socially neutral but rather encourage and discourage different choices, interaction patterns and ways of being. At the moment there seems to be a view that technology is an external force which follows a fixed trajectory. People claim “You can’t fight the future” by which they mean “One particular possible future“. This view is completely wrong. The direction of technological development is not pre-ordained but rather is shaped by people’s choices. At the moment these choices are being made for us all by a small group of silicon valley people with one particular world view. This again is not inevitable. Take action. Treat technology as a political issue. Shape your own future.

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Transmetropolitan: cyberpunk sauce anglaise

Transmetropolitan: cyberpunk sauce anglaise | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
Transmetropolitan: 1 200 pages de BD anglaise explosive. Au menu, journalisme gonzo et univers cyberpunk.
luiy's insight:

Les Beatles, les Stones, les Monty Python, Benny Hill, The Exploited, Napalm Death, le gigot d'agneau à la menthe (hmm, non pas ca en fait). Non content d'avoir offert au monde ces joyaux, la perfide Albion peut également se targuer d'avoir révolutionné l'approche du comic en jouant avec ses codes pour la rendre plus profonde. Alan Moore (Watchmen, V pour Vendetta, From Hell,...) est désormais bien connu des amateurs de BD en France mais l'Angleterre a encore beaucoup à nous offrir. Et en particulier Warren Ellis qui, avecTr, nous offre une combinaison jubilatoire du journalisme gonzo et de l'univers cyberpunk. Une oeuvre provocatrice et plus subtile qu'il n'y parait.

Le futur. Ni pire ni meilleur que notre mode actuel. Différent, c'est en revanche certain. L'arrivée des nouvelles technologies a amené une surveillance constante des autorités. Mais elle a permis de réaliser encore plus d'envies et de fantasmes. On peut désormais modifier ou améliorer son corps de la tête au pied, et plus encore... Du moment que l'on y met le prix. Une ville. Faisant furieusement penser à LA ville : New York. Les écrans déversent dans les rues des torrents de publicité et d'informations, distrayant la foule, indifférente aux exclus et autres mutants qui errent sans but. Et un homme, Spider Jerusalem. Journaliste cynique et enragé, forcé de revenir à la civilisation pour respecter un engagement avec son éditeur.
 
Les trois principaux "protagonistes" de Transmetropolitan étant présentés, c'est parti pour 1200 pages azimutées, sous la plume du scénariste Warren Ellis et le pinceau du dessinateur Darick Robertson (1). Adoptant le style du journaliste Hunter S Thompson (récit à la première personne et abandon de la neutralité), Transmetropolitan nous plonge dans une mégalopole suintante, débordante, saturée de vie, la pire comme la meilleure. Un univers très plausible. Trop même par moments. Car sous son aspect cyberpunk, permettant toutes les folies (cybernétique, cryogénisation, nanotechnologies), Warren Ellis nous renvoie, sans aucune concession mais avec talent et humour, l'image de notre monde actuel. Un monde ou consommer c'est vivre, où tout est fait pour éviter de trop penser.

 

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Andrea Naranjo's curator insight, March 12, 2013 5:14 PM

Pas nouveau mais intéressant

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The history of the birth of neuroculture « Mind Hacks

The history of the birth of neuroculture « Mind Hacks | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
In the following years, as neuroscience became prominent and psychoanalysis waned, pharmaceutical companies realised they had to sell theories to make their drugs marketable. The theories couldn't be the messy ideas of ...

Via RomanGodzich
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Meditating Mechanical Cyborg Sculptures by Ziwon Wang

Meditating Mechanical Cyborg Sculptures by Ziwon Wang | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
Meditating cyborgs by Ziwon Wang. Korean artist Ziwon Wang builds futuristic mechanical figure sculptures that appear to pray and meditate. The sculptures are Wang's vision of a future in which humans evolve into cyborgs.
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What Transgender Means for Transhumanism

What Transgender Means for Transhumanism | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
To biological essentialists, transgenderism is an abomination because it seeks not only to abandon the flesh as intended, but to reconstitute it, reauthor it, reimagine what the natural order has e...
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Wildcat2030's curator insight, March 25, 2013 5:39 AM

Interestin pov, think I'll write a piece about this issue

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Technological Body Modification: In Pursuit of Singularity

Technological Body Modification: In Pursuit of Singularity | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
Researchers and amateur practitioners alike are fusing man and machine to speed up communication and boost intelligence.
luiy's insight:

Temporary Cyborgs: Market-Ready Alternatives

 

Detachable headsets are proving a popular method of allowing users to experience temporary technological enhancements. While US internet search engine giant Google's Project Glass prototype presents a vision-based augmented reality system that responds to voice commands, other developers are looking to neurologically synched devices.

 

Californian neuro-sensor company NeuroSky released its MindWave Mobile device during 2012. The $130 wireless headset reads the wearer's brainwaves in the same way that sound-waves can be detected, allowing for the system to process thoughts as a means of interacting with apps and games. Detecting varying levels of concentration and attention, NeuroSky's system is iOS and Android compatible, and provides the basis for the Puzzlebox Orbit. This independently manufactured remote-controlled toy helicopter can be controlled by thought, and was funded via online crowd-funding platform Kickstarter.

 

Australian Neurotechnology firm Emotiv has released the EPOC headset ($299), which responds to the brain's electric signals using a similar system. With applications for gaming, music, visual arts, market research and medical uses such as mind-controlled electric wheelchair use, the headset highlights the practical and leisure uses for such technologies.

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Sight

A short futuristic film by Eran May-raz and Daniel Lazo. This is our graduation project from Bezaleal academy of arts. Please share if you enjoyed it! Contact:…

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Zan Chandler's curator insight, January 29, 2013 10:48 PM

Design Fictions - This brings my interests in film and futures together.