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Between Ape and Artilect. Pioneers of Artificial Intelligence | #nano #AI #cyborgs #FreeBook

Between Ape and Artilect. Pioneers of Artificial Intelligence | #nano #AI #cyborgs #FreeBook | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it

During 2010-12, noted AI researcher and long-time Humanity+ Board member Ben Goertzel conducted a series of textual interviews with researchers in various areas of cutting-edge science — artificial general intelligence, nanotechnology, life extension, neurotechnology, collective intelligence, mind uploading, body modification, neuro-spiritual transformation, and more. These interviews were published online in H+ Magazine, and are here gathered together in a single volume. The resulting series of dialogues treats a variety of social, futurological and scientific topics in a way that is accessible to the educated non-scientist, yet also deep and honest to the subtleties of the topics being discussed.

 

Between Ape and Artilect is a must-read if you want the real views, opinions, ideas, muses and arguments of the people creating our future.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
luiy's insight:

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

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aanve's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:03 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:40 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

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Brain Researchers Can Detect Who We Are Thinking About

Brain Researchers Can Detect Who We Are Thinking About | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it

Scientists scanning the human brain can now tell whom a person is thinking of, the first time researchers have been able to identify what people are imagining from imaging technologies.

Work to visualize thought is starting to pile up successes. Recently, scientists have used brain scans to decode imagery directly from the brain, such as what number people have just seen and what memory a person is recalling. They can now even reconstruct videos of what a person has watched based on their brain activity alone. Cornell University cognitive neuroscientist Nathan Spreng and his colleagues wanted to carry this research one step further by seeing if they could deduce the mental pictures of people that subjects conjure up in their heads.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
luiy's insight:

Imagining others


His team first gave 19 volunteers descriptions of four imaginary people they were told were real. Each of these characters had different personalities. Half the personalities were agreeable, described as liking to cooperate with others; the other half were less agreeable, depicted as cold and aloof or having similar traits. In addition, half these characters were described as outgoing and sociable extroverts, while the others were less so, depicted as sometimes shy and inhibited. The scientists matched the genders of these characters to each volunteer and gave them popular names like Mike, Chris, Dave or Nick, or Ashley, Sarah, Nicole or Jenny.

The researchers then scanned volunteers’ brains using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which measures brain activity by detecting changes in blood flow. During the scans, the investigators asked participants to predict how each of the four fictitious people might behave in a variety of scenarios — for instance, if they were at a bar and someone else spilled a drink, or if they saw a homeless veteran asking for change.

“Humans are social creatures, and the social world is a complex place,” Spreng says. “A key aspect to navigating the social world is how we represent others.”

 

The scientists discovered that each of the four personalities were linked to unique patterns of brain activity in a part of the organ known as the medial prefrontal cortex. In other words, researchers could tell whom their volunteers were thinking about.

 

“This is the first study to show that we can decode what people are imagining,” Spreng says.

 

Unlocking brain’s personality models
The medial prefrontal cortex helps people deduce traits about others. These findings suggest this region is also where personality models are encoded, assembled and updated, helping people understand and predict the likely behavior of others and prepare for the future.

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A Mind-Controlled Exoskeleton Will Kick Off the 2014 World Cup | #health #neuroscience

A Mind-Controlled Exoskeleton Will Kick Off the 2014 World Cup | #health #neuroscience | Cyborgs_Transhumanism | Scoop.it
It won't be a superstar football player who takes the first kick of 2014's Football World Cup in Brazil.
luiy's insight:

It won't be a superstar football player who takes the first kick of 2014's Football World Cup in Brazil. Nope, instead, it will be a teenager, paralysed from the waist down, who will use the world's most advanced mind-controlled exoskeleton to get things underway.

 

A small part of a large-scale international collaborative project called Walk Again, the exoskeleton technology in question supports the lower body, using brain activity to trigger movements in the suit. Brain waves are detected using electrodes on the scalp, beamed wirelessly to the exoskeleton, and processed into commands which produce movement.

 

That motion, however, will be complemented by feedback, to make the experience feel more natural. That means the suit will include sensors to monitor touch, temperature and forces on the suit, which will be fed back to the user via visual displays and vibrating motors. In theory, those same signals could be transmitted directly into the brain to allow the users to experience the suit as if it were part of them. But, one step at a time, right?

 

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