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DSLRs and the Future of Digital Camcorders | St. Paul Neighborhood Network

DSLRs and the Future of Digital Camcorders | St. Paul Neighborhood Network | Cutting Edge How to make in the industry & future of Cameras | Scoop.it
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Nikon Exploring 4K Video for Future DSLRs « No Film School

Nikon Exploring 4K Video for Future DSLRs « No Film School | Cutting Edge How to make in the industry & future of Cameras | Scoop.it
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SamProdanovich's comment, April 1, 2014 9:38 AM
"Nikon is the only major Japanese camera maker that doesn’t also have a dedicated video line, and as I’ve said in the past, they can either get into the video camera market, or produce the best video DSLRs out there because they won’t be hurting the upper end. Even though Nikon Rumors suggests the new D4s revealed at CES may include 4K video, I don’t think Nikon is ready yet based on the comments above. That product line certainly makes the most sense for having those higher-end functions, but based on how poorly resolved video was on the previous D4, they really should make sure that the 1080p looks good first, before worrying about 4K."
SamProdanovich's comment, April 1, 2014 9:38 AM
"Now, since Nikon has a QXD card slot in the D4, and will have one in the D4s, they could eventually implement some of these higher recording options without the cards being an issue. Unfortunately, the QXD cards aren’t quite fast enough for uncompressed 4K RAW, but they could be in the next few years as those speeds are in the QXD spec. What Nikon could do is come up with a compressed RAW like Blackmagic is planning on doing with their 4K camera. If they could make that work, and keep the components cool, they might be able to use current QXD cards to record depending on the compression ratio."
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Piracy and the Future of the Film Industry | Raindance

Piracy and the Future of the Film Industry | Raindance | Cutting Edge How to make in the industry & future of Cameras | Scoop.it
Raindance is dedicated to fostering and promoting independent film in the UK and around the world.
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SamProdanovich's comment, March 30, 2014 9:20 PM
Stealing movies off the internet is no longer a important subject. It may have went away in the media but in the film industry it is still a problem. Illegal downloads of movies are costing the film industry large amounts of money each year. In 2005 for some of the big motion picture studios lost about 6.1 billion as for the rest of the industry lost about 18.2 billion. The large amounts were said to be from the piracy that has been going on. All the money the companies are losing are doing nothing more than creating problems.
SamProdanovich's comment, March 30, 2014 9:29 PM
Although the movie industry is suffering from the massive amounts of money being lost, they have there ways to get around it. The industry is taking necessary steps by filing lawsuits and bringing an awareness to the outcome of the piracy. Recently one of the most popular illegal downloading website has been guilty of all the piracy is getting in trouble. One film industry in Australia is accusing the website of upgrading to a better deal. Although all of this is happening the “Trust for Internet Piracy Awareness “ in the united kingdom to another name such as ‘Piracy is theft.”
SamProdanovich's comment, March 30, 2014 9:34 PM
The delayed release dates from the rest of the world and American is one of the many problems that invites people to piracy. Many films are usually online before they are released in America and until they are in the actual movie theaters they will most likely be online. Usually anything that is said online concerning a film being shown in the US will never hiit places such as the UK for a while.
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Getting a Lucky Break in the Film Industry - Skillset

Getting a Lucky Break in the Film Industry - Skillset | Cutting Edge How to make in the industry & future of Cameras | Scoop.it
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SamProdanovich's comment, March 6, 2014 10:13 AM
“develop an effective system for recording and following up contacts;<br>join professional groups and associations – you can find contact details on the Creative Skillset website or in trade directories such as The Knowledge;<br>look out for networking opportunities, such as festivals and trade events.<br>ask fellow participants and tutors at training courses about their work and contacts;<br>don't be afraid to ask established practitioners if they have ten minutes to meet you for a coffee – many people working in the industry are giving of their time (they were once in your position too) and often like to be asked. This can be an invaluable way of meeting people in the industry and gives you a chance to ask questions, get advice and ensure they know about you;<br>where possible, socialise with the crew after a shoot;<br>use your social contacts (they may have friends or colleagues in the industry);<br>be prepared to do a few favours. Networking is a two-way street and you have to be prepared to share information. This often pays back;<br>remember to keep in touch with your contacts, even when you're not looking for work.”<br>
SamProdanovich's comment, March 6, 2014 10:15 AM
“Once you have identified who you are going to call, make sure you have paper and pen to hand and that you've noted the key points you want to make.<br>Once you've introduced yourself ask if this is a convenient time to talk and if not, ask when would be good to call back. Don't be offended if the person has no time to talk – they may well be in a difficult meeting and the fact that you have shown awareness that they have constraints on their time, will stand you in good stead.<br>Keep the conversation polite, friendly, enthusiastic and concise – remember, this is the first impression that they will have of you.<br>If you are invited to send a CV in, make sure you have noted their email address correctly – you don't want to have to call them back for it – that's irritating for them and makes you look unprofessional.<br>Thank them for their time.<br>If you get very nervous, a good trick is to stand up when you make the call – you will sound more confident straight away.<br>Make sure you make a record of the conversation – the last thing you want to do is call them again the next day without realizing you have already spoken to them. That is then what they will remember about you!<br>Act on what they have suggested you do – if they have asked for a CV, make sure you send it as quickly as possible. This will ensure they remember who you are and will put forward an enthusiastic and motivated impression of you. If you send it weeks later, it doesn't look like you're that committed and the position will have been filled by someone who is.<br>Don't forget that this is an industry where there are a lot of people going for a few jobs.”
SamProdanovich's comment, March 6, 2014 10:16 AM
“read the relevant trade, industry press, websites and directories to find out who is doing what, where and when;<br>have a strategy to keep informed about what's in pre-production and production;<br>keep up to date with production or business development plans (including in house newsletters and gossip!);<br>know what is going on in your region and make the most of the advantages of living there.”
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Clint Eastwood - Filmmaker Interview | American Masters | PBS

Clint Eastwood - Filmmaker Interview | American Masters | PBS | Cutting Edge How to make in the industry & future of Cameras | Scoop.it
AMERICAN MASTERS Online sat down with Clint Eastwood: Out of the Shadows director Bruce Ricker and writer David Kehr to get their thoughts on Eastwood, documentary filmmaking, and jazz.
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The Six Things You Must Know to Make it in the Film Industry

The Six Things You Must Know to Make it in the Film Industry | Cutting Edge How to make in the industry & future of Cameras | Scoop.it
As a coordinator and production supervisor in television and film and now as the Chair of the Film Division of Chapman University, Barbara Freedman Doyle is an expert at the mistakes people just entering the film industry make. Here, in an excerpt from her new book Make Your Movie: What You Need to Know About the Business and Politics of Filmmaking, now available from Focal Press, she gives some tips on how anyone entering the film industry can make sure they stop themselves from saying what they really think and stay in the good graces of those with the power to hire.
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SamProdanovich's comment, March 4, 2014 9:06 PM
In the industry relationships is the key word. There is always someone who gives another person a try because of their relationship. As a producer they would consider the director choose different positions such as a cinematographer but will never go in between the director and producers choice because they both have relationship. The people you make good relations with is nothing like friendship the bottom line is the history you make. Every day a person goes as another one with potential will enter the industry all the time. As said before your history is what will make it for you. If you went to school with someone or even have a common past or interest it is what can get you a step farther than others. Friendship may be a factor but more then likely people who have a simple relationship in the industry never see each other outside of work. Some people like a bad background of history but then a great success.
SamProdanovich's comment, March 5, 2014 10:20 AM
People who will hire you and accept you are educated gamblers. Those people take chances when saying yes. Getting anxious comes along with making the decisions that people that hire you because they need to also focus on spending money. The decisions they make are never really out of no where its a long thought out process. The hiring part may be as simple as hiring a assistant. When someone in the industry is about to hire the person that is wanting to get hired knows someone the boss knows that eliminates them not getting hired. In the industry also people will start from the lowest position such as an assistant or set assistant who helps with building the actual set. The option to hire a person at the absolute lowest job is all about how you do. If you have a good review from past people you worked with you will be at least fine. Bottom line is you need to be comfortable with yourself.
SamProdanovich's comment, March 5, 2014 5:09 PM
How you handle yourself is one of the most important things to have. The only way newer people get the opportunity is because they are good at what they can do and can have a positive attitude. If your in a bigger corporation and things were to get complicated the people who you work with should be able to count on you with a good attitude and never getting into a bad one. When filming for a while in a days period who is always complaining and never has a good attitude. The people that you work with are also there feeling the negative vibe your giving off. Nobody wants to deal with your bad attitude. As said before you should be happy and easy to be around when on set. When complaining and having a bad attitude is when you wont be going back to work for them. If it bothers you that bad then you should write about it somewhere personal but to never post it on the internet.
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What is 4K UHD? Next-generation resolution explained - CNET

What is 4K UHD? Next-generation resolution explained - CNET | Cutting Edge How to make in the industry & future of Cameras | Scoop.it
From the World Cup to Netflix, in 2014 you're going to start hearing a lot more about 4K resolution or 'Ultra HD.' But what is it? And more importantly, do you want it?
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What Future Challenges Does the Film Industry Face?

What Future Challenges Does the Film Industry Face? | Cutting Edge How to make in the industry & future of Cameras | Scoop.it
Answer by Mark Hughes, blogger, sold a few options on screenplays, doctored and edited some screenplays that were produced: I'd say the biggest challenge to the film industry in the future will be addressing the development of interactive technologies in other media. We're reaching a point where the way we...
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SamProdanovich's comment, April 1, 2014 9:19 AM
One of the biggest problems that are occuring in the film industry are the start of interactive technologies. Todays society is beginning to socialize with the entertainment industry and as media is advancing the reality and entertainment is nonexistent. We will likely see the middle of stories as actual people who view a story through what ever way they want to view it.
SamProdanovich's comment, April 1, 2014 9:31 AM
Imagine a group of people together in a theater watching a type of interactive movie to which the theater physically movies and and the different sounds are involved as the movie is shown. You could even choose different obsticals than other people in the theater. This will soon be the future and regular theaters were you just sit will soon be gone. This will be the past. Someday people will not even remember the theaters we have now! The older ways of story telling will be in the past and what we know as a long time ago will no longer be in our minds to other people.
SamProdanovich's comment, April 1, 2014 9:34 AM
Many films and theaters will soon update themselves and change to the current society. 3-D will soon be something old and will not be an interest to many people. When attending a movie you will have options to interect with the people in the movies.
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The future of video DSLRs

The future of video DSLRs | Cutting Edge How to make in the industry & future of Cameras | Scoop.it
OK...daunting post this...as things are moving so fast. But this needs to be said. DSLRs have changed filmmaking for so many and when I say so many I mean an enormous amount. It's insane just how many people are buying these cameras to shoot video on. It has taken everyone by surprise, including the manufacturers.…
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SamProdanovich's comment, March 26, 2014 10:06 AM
A new camera known as the DSLR has determined the future for many film makers. So many people are going out and buying the cameras to make videos. One of the major manufacturers, Canon have competion with other companies. The newest camera T2i is giving every person the opportunity. Many college kids going to film school are collabing with each other and buying the camera. The best of the best camera you can obtain is if it has excellent lenses, and monitors but that is all obtainable with the T2i.
SamProdanovich's comment, March 26, 2014 10:14 AM
Many people forget that some cameras are not made for videos. Most cameras are made for pictures. Some video functions such as hd-sdi or XLR is more pricer. Many photographers dont want this function. The Canon 5Dmk 3 is hesitant to come out and will most likely not come out for a year but when it will it will include features such as a HDMI and better higher quality audio.
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The Future of the Movie Industry - Haydenfilms Institute

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Hot Tips From Top Directors On How To Find Your Voice

Hot Tips From Top Directors On How To Find Your Voice | Cutting Edge How to make in the industry & future of Cameras | Scoop.it
If there is one defining quality that unites the world’s most iconic filmmakers – those who can boast both critical acclaim and cult status – it is a unique, distinctive, unmistakable style that sets them apart from their counterparts. From the pregnant pauses and surreal dreamscapes of a David Lynch film to the dramatic lighting and chilling suspense of a Hitchcock thriller or the darkly comic, macabre twist of a Tim Burton fantasy, a great director should be instantly identifiable to the audience by his ‘voice’ alone.
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SamProdanovich's comment, March 4, 2014 8:29 PM
A good dictation a director is going good is when the feel of the film comes from the person who filmed not from a script. Many people consider different techniques such as camera angles, the time of scene length, the lighting or even the spaces between the words spoken that speak the story of any plot line.