Cutting Edge 2 & 3- Weather Forecasting and Satellite Technology
16 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

About Environmental Satellites

About Environmental Satellites | Cutting Edge 2 & 3- Weather Forecasting and Satellite Technology | Scoop.it
more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, April 3, 2014 8:28 PM
9. At a certain specified time, polar satellites tend to pass over a set location given and records picture radar. It can capture around two whole orbits around the Earth a day, because it completes 14 whole orbits at different specific points each time. The biggest benefit of the polar orbiting satellites is the low lying space between the atmosphere and the satellite. This lowers the cost and adds an advancement to the picture quality.
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, April 3, 2014 9:23 PM
10. Geocentric models of satellites tend to take longer to orbit the Earth, this is somewhat of a downfall because by the time the radar is shown it could be too late for predicting. They are more detailed images though, using infrared and visible parts of the light spectrum to capture these images. Advancements in these low resolution pictures are being made day by day, by creating more accurate picture taking models.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

New Generation Satellites Shine on Weather Forecasting

New Generation Satellites Shine on Weather Forecasting | Cutting Edge 2 & 3- Weather Forecasting and Satellite Technology | Scoop.it
The continuous improvement of weather forecasts and climate predictions is highly dependent on a new generation of weather satellites.
Elizabeth Palumbi's insight:

TOPIC 3

more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, April 2, 2014 3:19 PM
6. Since satellites usually roam around space, they cannot see much through the thick cloud covers, with the new generation of satellites this is possible. They can now see within the clouds and accurately depict what type of precipitation is falling below the clouds, or will. This is then sent to the weather centers linked below. Recently, they have just made a new faster satellite that will be launched in 2015.
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, April 2, 2014 3:22 PM
7. This new satellite, better known as the GOES R will equip meteorologists with the information they need to make accurate calculations of the atmosphere. It will give specifics about the climate, temperature, and environmental statistics. This will cut the extreme costs of damage that is produced through the severe storms in our country. The United States is in desperate need for this technology considering the lack of forecasting that is caused by the ever changing world around us.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

New Technology Allows Better Extreme Weather Forecasts

New Technology Allows Better Extreme Weather Forecasts | Cutting Edge 2 & 3- Weather Forecasting and Satellite Technology | Scoop.it
New technology that increases the warning time for tornadoes and hurricanes could potentially save hundreds of lives every year
Elizabeth Palumbi's insight:

TOPIC 3

more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, April 1, 2014 9:19 AM
3. A big advancement within the field of meteorology is the powerful strength of radar. It establishes the reflection of the particles within the atmosphere by sending out radio waves to the local area. The waves either come straight back or at different speeds and directions, therefore indicating something within the forecast. It allows them to grasp information before the storms ever produce anything severe enough to cause potential damage.
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, April 1, 2014 9:24 AM
4. Around ninety percent of the data retrieved by NWS and NOAA is grasped by the satellites up high in the atmosphere and space. They are better known as geostationary satellites, meaning they are taking information of the earth from a specific spot in higher elevations. These take pictures of the radar and cloud cover ever few minutes timed as wished by the meteorologists. There is also a satellite called the polar satellite, this has more intricate information with layers of the clouds and precipitation levels. It is not always fast enough though since it only sends pictures of the globe every twelve hours.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

WORK-BASED EXPERIENCE

WORK-BASED EXPERIENCE | Cutting Edge 2 & 3- Weather Forecasting and Satellite Technology | Scoop.it

This is just one of many pictures of when I spent a week up at Penn State Weather Camp. I was in the process of watching a day to day work schedule of the meteorologists within AccuWeather. They were showing the high-tech new data used on television screens and model production.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

New Supercomputers Aid Weather Forecasts - YouTube

Subscribe to the VOA Learning English Channel: http://youtube.com/voalearningenglish | Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/voalearningenglish From VOA L...
more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 12, 2014 9:48 AM
One of the major effects on predicting storms is the ocean, this is due to the climate change and very close interaction with the Earth's atmosphere. The problem with the new supercomputer is the amount of power and electricity to power this big of technology. It helps process the major predictions of air pressure, humidity, wind speed, and temperatures.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

Exponential Changes in Forecasting - AccuWeather.com

Meteorologists have gone from forecasting three days of weather to forecasting 25. New technology makes that possible.
more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 10, 2014 12:39 PM
3. Meteorological forecasting first started out as plainly watching the Earth's patterns and the movement of the sky. In the 1950s, the first ever computer to ever process and breakdown the main information for meteorologists. Later in that year, they were being used for improvement in the forecasting world along with having most of the government use them for military uses. Once the years went on, many satellites and other innovations were added to better predict the troubling atmosphere.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

Four-dimensional Stormcell Investigator (FSI)

Four-dimensional Stormcell Investigator (FSI) | Cutting Edge 2 & 3- Weather Forecasting and Satellite Technology | Scoop.it
Meteorological Development Laboratory Home.
more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 12, 2014 9:35 AM
These are all of the major FSI components that contribute to the research into the forecasting of tornadoes. "Linked four-panel design, with a constant elevation angle panel, a CAPPI panel, a Vertical Cross-section panel, and a panel displaying the data in three-dimensions. Animation (looping) controls for the added 4 th dimension.<br>Keyboard shortcuts (“hotkeys”) for selection of elevation angles, volume scan times, radar products, and other navigation short-cuts (e.g., reset to zenith view).<br>Rapid loading of image frames (either on the fly, or via pre-loading), and rapid panning, zooming, pitch and yaw of 3D data."
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 12, 2014 9:38 AM
Severe storm forecasting is one of the most tricky jobs in the country because of how unpredictable the weather may be. The newest improvement to tracking and forecasting severe storms would be the FSI. This technology allows meteorologists to break apart the data accumulated over the mile radius of the storm by examining the altitude and distance it will travel. It also shows over a period of time the three or four dimensional picture of what the storm looks like in the atmosphere to show the extent of the damage it could cause.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

Incredible Technology: How to Forecast Severe Storms

Incredible Technology: How to Forecast Severe Storms | Cutting Edge 2 & 3- Weather Forecasting and Satellite Technology | Scoop.it
Predicting how strong a storm, whether a hurricane, tornado or thunderstorm will be is part science and part art — and it wouldn't be possible without sophisticated measurement and forecasting technology.
Elizabeth Palumbi's insight:

TOPIC 3

more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, April 2, 2014 3:26 PM
8. The new satellite data being depicted from the roaming cameras is now being taken into the new computer models. These models are then torn apart and analyzed by particular meteorologists, the difference is though, the information being brought in. They now hold temperature, climate, size, precipitation, and cloud coverage. All things some of the local meteorologists cannot see just from a radar on their screen.They are always looking for the most data he or she can get from the models.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

Understanding you Environment

Understanding you Environment | Cutting Edge 2 & 3- Weather Forecasting and Satellite Technology | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Palumbi's insight:

TOPIC 3

more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, April 1, 2014 9:28 AM
5. With the great technological advances in satellite forecasting, comes even more detailed analysis's of the atmosphere. The more advanced ones, can tell meteorologists the specifics of the cloud cover, such as the movement and strength of the storms. It also plays a large role in forecasting the jet stream levels and boundaries within the systems. It lastly makes it easier to see the change in clouds going from cumulus to just stratus clouds better showing where the temperatures are increasing and decreasing as well.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

GPM satellite to usher in a new era of weather observation

GPM satellite to usher in a new era of weather observation | Cutting Edge 2 & 3- Weather Forecasting and Satellite Technology | Scoop.it
The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory which is designed to take detailed, near real-time measurements of rain and snowfall on a global...
Elizabeth Palumbi's insight:

TOPIC 3

more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 31, 2014 8:06 PM
1. There is a new satellite system known as the GPM satellite which has taken over the way meteorologists can predict more accurately. This system can tell anyone with the signal the magnitude of precipitation headed their way by microwaves from within the satellite itself. The first of this kind was used to detect only small amounts of snow and rain and now is regularly observation larger quantities of precipitation. The way it is more accurate is by the particles within the clouds being detected by the radar, this sends back detailed feedback of the clouds layers of each individual part.
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 31, 2014 8:09 PM
2. This particular satellite and weather detecting system is going to help out all over the country with better extreme weather forecasting. It would cause more time for those in the way of the storm to prepare themselves or evacuate from the premise. It should also help in proving the water cycles within people's theories of global warming.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

INTERVIEW!

Interview with Valerie from WPXI weather channel!

vsmock@wpxi.com

Elizabeth Palumbi's insight:

 

1. Do you enjoy your job? What are the rewards of your job?

Yes I do enjoy my job – unless I don’t quite get the forecast right and then it can be rough. The best part of my day is getting to tell people information they need to know. I not only tell them what is happening, but why it's happening and how it will affect them. I enjoy being a part of the media and being in front of the camera. There are times you will go to the store and people will recognize you from television. So if you enjoy that then you’re in luck. There are downfalls, such as not correctly forecasting a storm or having to hear people's negative comments and criticism.

 

2. What is the best education or training for your work?

Training is ongoing as education is very important. I have my meteorology certificate from Mississippi State University and that program is 3 years long. If you get a full meteorology degree, it generally takes about 4 years. There is a lot of math and science in weather so it's important to have that type of background and education. The National Weather Service also holds different seminars and meetings that can be used to help further your education and get additional training.

Meteorology is a broad field that touches on nearly every area of science, so a general background in math, science and technology is included in every meteorological curriculum. In some respects, meteorology has become applied mathematics, so a solid background in math is essential. If you are planning on becoming a television meteorologist, then communication skills are very important.

 

3. Do you work alone or with others, how much of the time? Do you ever work in groups?

You generally work alone each day, at least at most television stations. However, when a big storm is coming through, we will track the conditions together and combine all of our knowledge and expertise into one in hopes of putting together the best and most accurate forecast. When I worked at AccuWeather you will see a much different story. There are more than 100 meteorologists in one building and they work together to put the forecast out.

4. How might this job change in the next 10 years? How will technology affect this occupation?

New technology comes out all the time. Models become clearer and more reliable. I see many of the aspects of weather and the tools we use getting better. Social media has also changed the game. So many people now have smart phones and tablets allowing them to get information right away. This can be useful if the power goes out. If your television isn’t working, how can you get the needed info? You can easily head to your phone or tablet and get the information there. We try to keep people updated on Facebook and Twitter during weather events in case they are on the go and can’t turn on the television and watch our newscast.

5. How did you decide to do this kind of work? What motivated you to be interested in this particular career?

I have always enjoyed weather growing up. I am from the Snowbelt in Northeast Ohio, so I've always been around crazy weather. I also lived in Montana and they have Chinook winds. They are known as "snow-eaters." The winds are warmer so if there is any snow, they'll get rid of them quickly but also make it windy and warm. The next day you could be back to colder weather. I had originally gone into the news anchor/reporter route but kept falling back into the weather end of the business. It was something I took to like a duck to water and just couldn't walk away from it. It was my internship at WKYC in Cleveland that really pushed me into really enjoying the weather. I had at one time thought about being a psychologist but decided to go in the news route.

 

6. If you were to mentor me and advise me on choosing a college for meteorology, which of these colleges would you pick and why? Florida State, Embry-Riddle, or University of Oklahoma?

I have heard two of the better colleges for meteorology are Florida State and Penn State University. If you would ever want to get a job at AccuWeather, they work closely with Penn State. I have also heard great things about Florida State. As for the University of Oklahoma, you get to work in tornado alley so I can imagine you’d get to storm chase a bit. If you want hurricanes and sunny, warm days, then Florida may be the way to go! I haven’t heard much about Embry-Riddle’s meteorology program.

7. When I’m finished with my training, what suggestions would you give someone who is trying to locate job opportunities in this field?

In general, you should take as many math and science classes as possible. You can get a full meteorology degree or a meteorology certificate from a school such as Mississippi State University. They are known for their online meteorology courses that are designed for on-air/TV meteorologists. You can take the track of working at the National Weather Service, doing weather in the military or at a TV station. You can also focus on a specific track such as climatology or forensic meteorology. It can be tough getting into the business, especially if you want to work in television. Be prepared to start small and not make much money. My first job was in Great Falls, Montana and I only made $20,000 a year.

 

8. What do you like best about this job? What do you like least about this job?

I enjoy doing the weather because it's something that affects everyone. You need to know what the day will hold and plan on if you need a jacket or an umbrella. I like hearing from viewers that they enjoy watching my broadcasts or that they can relate to me. It's nice to hear the feedback, knowing you are doing a good job. When you are able to forecast a storm correctly, that is always an added bonus. It's tough when you 'bust' on a forecast and the storm doesn't pan out like you had forecasted it to. It's also unfortunate when you hear the negative comments from people, but it can be constructive criticism that helps you in the end.

 

9. What advice would you give someone entering this field of work?

If I could give myself any advice it would be to take more science classes. I didn't really like math and science, so I tried to avoid the classes as much as I could. I had the chance to take more of those classes in college and if I could do it differently, I would have. You should learn as much as you can and practice, practice, practice. I'd also tell myself to have a thick skin because it's a tough business trying to forecast what Mother Nature is thinking and people will give you a hard time if you get the weather wrong. Some people also like to tell you why they don't like you or your clothing or your hair. I'd advise myself to just take the comments with a grain of salt.

10. What is one thing that surprised you about your career/current position?

I didn’t think I would need a lot of math and science. For some reason, I anticipated math being the farthest thing from my mind when I graduated. Keep in mind I graduated with a degree in Broadcast Journalism. Then when I decided to go back to school for weather I realized the mistake I had made by not gaining as much education as I could. My suggestion: be a sponge and take everything in that you can. I also knew the viewers would likely have an opinion about me and how I did my job. I didn’t realize how opinionated and critical they could be toward me.

11. Was it easy finding a job and one that is well-paid enough to stabilize your debt and expenses?

Like I mentioned before, you have to be prepared to be the low man on the totem pole. I had to work at a number of television stations before getting to make a reasonable salary. It’s important to take advantage of a 401K to start saving. You should also be prepared to eat mac and cheese and ramen noodles when you start out. I thought my professors were joking. They weren’t really kidding. It’s also good to get a few internships if you can. Some are paid but not all. Learn as much as you can and try and do lots to gain as much knowledge as possible. Those key things helped me get the position I have now and the ones prior to my current career.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

Weather Forecasting Goes High Tech - YouTube

There's a new super computer in town, and it's goal is to provide a better understanding of storm prediction, drought and flood behavior.
more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 12, 2014 9:43 AM
The drought and flood behavior within the atmospheres weather is being tracked along with many other climate changes with the new supercomputer. This new computer is better known as the Yellowstone since where it was originated, it is one of the most powerful and systematic computers in the country. The weather forecasting computer increases the accuracy of finding the time span of a severe storm by over 30%.
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 12, 2014 9:45 AM
It is a quick forecasting system within the National Weather Service not only for tornadoes, but also the deadly hurricanes that typically hit the south. It has quickened the reaction time for when storms will hit by a little over five days, whereas before this computer it was around a small three days. It allows a more specific outlook on the unpredictability of mother nature.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

Local meteorologists seeing big picture with new radar

Local meteorologists seeing big picture with new radar | Cutting Edge 2 & 3- Weather Forecasting and Satellite Technology | Scoop.it
As the storm known on social media as #gobblegeddon swept toward Pittsburgh on Monday, local meteorologists consulted their computer models to predict its impact on holiday travelers. Unlike the "Snowmageddon" -- are we sensing a naming trend here? -- of February 2010, however, they now have a new technology at hand. Nearly 30 years in development, the National Weather Service's "dual polarization radar" doesn't just detect precipitation and determine its movement, as with conventional Doppler radar. The "dual pol" system creates a two-dimensional picture that can identify different sizes of raindrops, hail, snow, ice pellets and other flying objects, including insects. "It sends a pulse out in two different planes, a horizontal plane and a vertical plane," explained Jack Boston, expert
more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 10, 2014 9:42 AM
1. Two-dimensional picture radar has become a worldwide sensation within the meteorological world today. It can detect not only the traditional radar but also sizes and types of precipitations. It is known as the "dual polarization radar" created but the one and only National Weather Service around thirty years later.
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 10, 2014 9:45 AM
2. This system reduces the money spent into fixing townships and cities throughout the United States related to storms. It helps to watch the directions of the storms entering the vast hills of Pennsylvania and around 160 more places around the country.The way it detects these mass systems is by sending out two different directions of pulses and sending back information on the depth of the clouds and also the types.
Scooped by Elizabeth Palumbi
Scoop.it!

Tornadoes_web_version_final.pdf

more...
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 12, 2014 9:32 AM
"National Weather Service Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) play a vital role in issuing severe weather forecasts and warnings. The 122 WFOs across the country narrow the threats by focusing on current and evolving weather conditions for their assigned region. Using advanced Doppler radars, trained storm spotters, reports from the general public and their knowledge of the local area, meteorologists at the WFOs issue tornado and severe thunderstorm warnings to alert the public of the imminent threat of severe weather and to take cover."
Elizabeth Palumbi's comment, March 12, 2014 9:33 AM
"The Testbed’s basic and applied research focuses on understanding severe weather processes, developing weather observation technology, and improving forecast tools, with emphasis on weather radar, hydrometeorology, and forecast and warning improvements. This collaboration increases the understanding of hazardous weather environments across the United States and the world, and promotes the infusion of new science and technology into SPC forecast operations."