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Full Programs from the World Science Festival Archive

Full Programs from the World Science Festival Archive | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows everyone -- experts and enthusiasts alike -- to engage with scientific discoveries in unique and thrilling ways. Through theatrical works, interactive exhibits, intimate discussions, and major outdoor experiences, the Festival takes science out of the laboratory and into the streets, museums, galleries, and premier performing arts venues around the world.


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7 Online Creative Writing Apps to Make Writing Enjoyable for Students

7 Online Creative Writing Apps to Make Writing Enjoyable for Students | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

Break that writer's block! Here are 7 great online creative writing apps to inspire creativity for writing and other creative projects for any student.


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Scientists Just Discovered There Are 'Bees' in the Oceans

Scientists Just Discovered There Are 'Bees' in the Oceans | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

Huh...
MIKE MCRAE 3 DEC 2016


For the first time, researchers have found evidence that underwater ecosystems have pollinators that perform the same task as bees on land.

Just like their terrestrial cousins, grasses under the sea shed pollen to sexually reproduce. Until now, biologists assumed the marine plants relied on water alone to spread their genes far and wide. But the discovery of pollen-carrying ‘bees of the sea’ has changed all of that.

Over several years from 2009 to 2012, researchers from the National Autonomous University of Mexico filmed the spring nocturnal wanderings of crustaceans among beds of turtle seagrass, Thalassia testudinum.

Looking through the videos, they spotted more invertebrates visiting male pollen-bearing flowers than those that lacked pollen – just like bees hovering around pollen-producing plants on land.

"We saw all of these animals coming in, and then we saw some of them carrying pollen," lead researcher Brigitta van Tussenbroek told New Scientist. 

The concept was so new, they invented a new term to describe it: zoobenthophilous pollination. Before that, researchers had never predicted that animals were involved in pollinating marine plants. 

Wondering if the invertebrates were actually pollinating the seagrasses, or just feeding on it, van Tussenbroek and her team added an assortment of tiny crustaceans to an aquarium of turtle-grass.

In minutes, pollen had appeared on the female flowers, compared with no transfer in the control tank that didn’t have crustaceans in it. The take home message was clear: tiny crustaceans were carrying pollen from flower to flower, helping to fertilise them. In the wild, they think this happens in addition to pollination via water currents.

So what's going on here? It’s likely that the animals are attracted to the sticky pollen made by the male flowers of seagrass, rather than having any charitable incentive. Gorging on their meal, pollen clings to the crustaceans’ bodies, where it is transferred to other flowers as they continue to feed, just like bees.

So far, the researchers have only shown this relationship with turtle-grass, which have large flowers. It’s yet to be seen if the other 60-odd species of seagrass also rely on ‘sea bees’ to carry their pollen.

Kelly Darnell from the non-profit research group The Water Institute of the Gulf told New Scientist:

"That pollination by animals can occur adds an entirely new level of complexity to the system, and describes a very interesting plant-animal interaction that hasn’t really fully been described before."

It’s no secret that coastal meadows of seagrass are immensely important ecosystems. Not only do they support diverse communities of animal, from tiny crustaceans to large marine mammals like the dour-faced dugong, but their roots also hold onto sediment and prevent erosion. 

Given it takes two hectares of tropical forest to match the carbon contained within a single hectare of seagrass, ecologists are now recognising the significance of their ‘blue carbon’ reserves.

Unfortunately, hidden beneath the waves, our blue ecosystems are often overlooked. Knowing how communities of plants and animal interact in our coastal environments will be important if we’re to have a good shot at protecting them. 

This research was recently published in the journal Nature Communications.


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How Forests Heal People

Learn how forests have the ability to heal people. Please share and help spread some healing. For more info visit: http://www.healingforest.org Credits: Words…
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A Gamified e-Learning Design Model to Promote and Improve Learning

A Gamified e-Learning Design Model to Promote and Improve Learning | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
This paper takes a deeper look at techniques suitable for education and e-learning, and comes out with a model that describes the design of educational gamification.

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delta14's curator insight, October 28, 11:46 AM
Describe los componentes lúdicos que favorecen los aprendizajes en ambientes virtuales.
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A Brief History of Mythology - Greece and the Classical World ...

A Brief History of Mythology - Greece and the Classical World ... | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
The Ancient Greeks had one of the richest mythologies, involving scores of gods and goddesses. The writings that ... When the Romans conquered most of Europe a few centuries later, they adopted many of the Greek myths.

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How to turn on the part of your brain that controls Motivation

How to turn on the part of your brain that controls Motivation | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
We know we should put the cigarettes away or make use of that gym membership, but in the moment, we just don’t do it. There is a cluster of neurons in our brain critical for motivation, though. What if you could hack them to motivate yourself?

These neurons are located in the middle of the brain, in a region called the ventral tegmental area. A paper published Thursday in the journal Neuron suggests that we can activate the region with a little bit of training.

The researchers stuck 73 people into an fMRI, a scanner that can detect what part of the brain is most active, and focused on that area associated with motivation. When the researchers said “motivate yourself and make this part of your brain light up,” people couldn’t really do it.

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Why Our Brains Love Good Storytelling

Why Our Brains Love Good Storytelling | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Studying the neuroscience of compelling communication.

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Irish are 'the forgotten white slaves’ claims expert

Irish are 'the forgotten white slaves’ claims expert | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

The little-known history of the Irish slave trade.


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Librarian Approved: 30 Ed-Tech Apps to Inspire Creativity and Creation

Librarian Approved: 30 Ed-Tech Apps to Inspire Creativity and Creation | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
A group of tech-savvy librarians offer up a list of their favorite education apps this year.

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António Leça Domingues's curator insight, August 30, 6:03 AM
Aplicações para potenciar a criação e a criatividade.
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New theory of how we move through time

New theory of how we move through time | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

Associate Professor Dr Joan Vaccaro, of Griffith's Centre for Quantum Dynamics, has solved an anomaly of conventional physics and shown that a mysterious effect called 'T violation' could be the origin of time evolution and conservation laws.

"I begin by breaking the rules of physics, which is rather bold I have to admit, but I wanted to understand time better and conventional physics can't do that," Dr Vaccaro says.

 

"I do get conventional physics in the end though. This means that the rules I break are not fundamental. It also means that I can see why the universe has those rules. And I can also see why the universe advances in time."

 

In her research published in The Royal Society Dr Vaccaro says T violation, or a violation of time reversal (T) symmetry, is forcing the universe and us in it, into the future. "If T violation wasn't involved we wouldn't advance in time and we'd be stuck at the Big Bang, so this shows how we escaped the Big Bang.

 

"I found the mechanism that forces us to go to the future, the reason why you get old and the reason why we advance in time." "The universe must be symmetric in time and space overall. But we know that there appears to be a preferred direction in time because we are incessantly getting older not younger."

 

The anomaly Dr Vaccaro solves involves two things not accounted for in in conventional physical theories -- the direction of time, and the behavior of the mesons, which decay differently if time went in the opposite direction.

 

Experiments show that the behavior of mesons depends on the direction of time; in particular, if the direction of time was changed then their behavior would also," she says.

 

"Conventional physical theories can accommodate only one direction of time and one kind of meson behavior, and so they are asymmetric in this regard. But the problem is that the universe cannot be asymmetric overall.

 

"This means that physical theories must be symmetric in time. To be symmetric in time they would need to accommodate both directions of time and both meson behaviors. This is the anomaly in physics that I am attempting to solve."

 

Dr Vaccaro is presenting her work at the Soapbox Science event held in Brisbane as part of National Science Week, titled "The meaning of time: why the universe didn't stay put at the big bang and how it is 'now' and no other time."

 

Without any T violation the theory gives a very strange universe. An object like a cup can be placed in time just like it is in space.

"It just exists at one place in space and one point in time. There is nothing unusual about being at one place in space, but existing at one point in time means the object would come into existence only at that point in time and then disappear immediately.

 

"This means that conservation of matter would be violated. It also means that there would be no evolution in time. People would only exist for a single point in time -- they would not experience a "flow of time."

 

When Dr Vaccaro adds T violation to the theory, things change dramatically. "The cup is now found at any and every time," she says,

 

"This means that the theory now has conservation of matter -- the conservation has emerged from the theory rather than being assumed. Moreover, objects change over time, cups chip and break, and people would grow old and experience a "flow of time." This means that the theory now has time evolution.


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New Economies for Native Nations | The Progressive

New Economies for Native Nations | The Progressive | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

Given the federal government’s responsibility to tribes, based on treaties, Congress passed the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988, authorizing tribes to construct casinos. This was seen as the most promising solution to end federal government dependency by promoting economic self-sufficiency.

But nearly three decades later, most of the more than 500 federally recognized tribal nations have not seen the payoff of Vegas-style gaming. Today, the unemployment rate among American Indians is still nearly double that of the national average. One in four Indians continue to live in poverty.

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New fossil evidence supports theory that first mass extinction engineered by early animals

New fossil evidence supports theory that first mass extinction engineered by early animals | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Newly discovered fossil evidence from Namibia strengthens the proposition that the world's first mass extinction was caused by 'ecosystem engineers' -- newly evolved biological organisms that altered the environment so radically it drove older species to extinction.

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15 writing tips from great 20th-century authors

15 writing tips from great 20th-century authors | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

Hemingway, Vonnegut, Bradbury, Orwell—even a couple of guys named Strunk & White—offer insights about keeping text lively and informative.


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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, December 1, 10:45 PM

Success can speak for itself.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, December 10, 6:09 AM
Success can speak for itself.
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Biogeochemistry: Projections of the soil-carbon deficit : Nature

Biogeochemistry: Projections of the soil-carbon deficit : Nature | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

Global soil carbon is a bit like the US federal deficit: the quantity of carbon is massive, its annual change is the difference between two large input and output terms (akin to revenues and expenditures), and its changes add up over decades to have major consequences for society. Changes in the planet's soil-carbon stocks result mostly from a modest difference between the main input term — plant carbon derived from photosynthesis — and the main output term, which is respiratory losses of carbon dioxide from microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. Both photosynthesis and respiration will respond to climate change, but predicting how these responses will affect the modest difference in photosynthetic input and respiratory output (and thus the effect on the storage of carbon in the soil) is challenging. Crowther et al.1 have synthesized the results from 49 soil-warming experiments, and on page 104 they report that losses from carbon-rich Arctic soils might tip the global balance of soil-carbon storage towards a net positive feedback to climate change.


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The largest river on Earth is invisible — and airborne #Amazon

The largest river on Earth is invisible — and airborne #Amazon | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
On a typical day in the Amazon, 20 billion metric tons of water pass upward through the trees and into the air. Here's why this matters.

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Eric Larson's curator insight, December 5, 5:16 PM
Water passes through trees?
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Watch Leonardo DiCaprio's riveting new climate change documentary 'Before The Flood' for free this week

Watch Leonardo DiCaprio's riveting new climate change documentary 'Before The Flood' for free this week | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Leonardo DiCaprio's new documentary is available for free on YouTube through November 6th.
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Schools as Ecosystems

Schools as Ecosystems | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Buchanan’s insight has significant implications for the way schools integrate teaching around fixed and growth mindset. He further asserts, “Today, a growing community of educators are using this ecosystems perspective to rethink the purpose of school fundamentally. At the core of this community is a simple question; what does it mean to be successful in life? As Albert Einstein argues, “Try not to become a man of success, but rather try to become a man of value.” Rather than being driven by individual gain, this community is finding there is the real value, in being of value - to themselves, to others, to nature and the future. It is a purpose-driven mindset that is redefining success; from being the best in the world, to being the best for the world. It is the Benefit Mindset.”

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The Library of Greek Mythology (Oxford Worlds Classics) von ...

The Library of Greek Mythology (Oxford Worlds Classics) von ... | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
The only work of its kind to survive from classical antiquity, the Library of Apollodorus is a unique guide to Greek mythology, from the origins of the universe to the Trojan War.

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Stephen Wolfram: AI & The Future Of Human Civilization

Stephen Wolfram: AI & The Future Of Human Civilization | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

What makes us different from all these things? What makes us different is the particulars of our history, which gives us our notions of purpose and goals. That's a long way of saying when we have the box on the desk that thinks as well as any brain does, the thing it doesn't have, intrinsically, is the goals and purposes that we have. Those are defined by our particulars—our particular biology, our particular psychology, our particular cultural history.

 

The thing we have to think about as we think about the future of these things is the goals. That's what humans contribute, that's what our civilization contributes—execution of those goals; that's what we can increasingly automate. We've been automating it for thousands of years. We will succeed in having very good automation of those goals. I've spent some significant part of my life building technology to essentially go from a human concept of a goal to something that gets done in the world.

 

There are many questions that come from this. For example, we've got these great AIs and they're able to execute goals, how do we tell them what to do?...

 

STEPHEN WOLFRAM, distinguished scientist, inventor, author, and business leader, is Founder & CEO, Wolfram Research; Creator, Mathematica, Wolfram|Alpha & the Wolfram Language; Author, A New Kind of Science. Stephen Wolfram's Edge Bio Page


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(EN) - Greek Mythology | mythweb.com

(EN) - Greek Mythology | mythweb.com | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Mythweb. This site is devoted to the heroes, gods and monsters of Greek mythology. Please note that Mythweb does not pretend to cover all the characters of Greek mythology. Joel Skidmore."


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Melissa Hobbs's curator insight, March 26, 2015 4:18 PM

Students can learn about different myths and Greek gods using this page. 

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Have physicists discovered a fifth force of nature?

Have physicists discovered a fifth force of nature? | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
If true, this would be a revolution of almost Einsteinian proportions. But don’t fall off your chair just yet, writes Cathal O’Connell.
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Mythical #Benben Stone: The Landing Site of Egyptian God Atum #history #archeology

Mythical #Benben Stone: The Landing Site of Egyptian God Atum #history #archeology | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
by Wu Mingren
Ancient Origins
The Benben stone is an object that is found in the mythology of ancient Egypt.
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The demise of the Maya civilization: Water shortage can destroy cultures

The demise of the Maya civilization: Water shortage can destroy cultures | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Something really drastic must have happened to the Ancient Maya at the end of the Classic Period in the 9th century. Within a short period of time, this advanced civilisation in Central America went from flourishing to collapsing—th

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1918 Occupation Force : Forgotten War: Yanks in Russia

VLADIVOSTOK, Soviet Union — There are no longer many people with personal recollections of when American soldiers landed in Russia.

But Fyodor Kobuishev remembers. He is in his 80s now, with white hair, and he recalls vividly the day that the doughboys rolled through in their wagons.

The Bolshevik state was very young, and Kobuishev was not much older, when the United States, along with other foreign powers, sent in troops to support the anti-Communist Russians, known as the Whites, who had risen against the Reds in the waning months of World War I.

"In the Amur district alone, Americans destroyed 25 villages," it said. "In March, 1919 . . . they attacked the totally peaceful village of Ivanovka, burned it down and killed 1,300 of its inhabitants."


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